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Catholic Perspective Please see Catechism of Church, Part 4 Christian Prayer especially CCC, 2559: 2559 "Prayer is the raising of one's mind and heart to God or the requesting of good things from God."[St. John Damascene, Defide orth. 3,24:PG 94,1089C.] But when we pray, do we speak from the height of our pride and will, or "out of the depths" of a ...


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How does the Bible teach us to direct our prayers? In Scripture we read in the Lord's Prayer that we should pray in this manner, "Our Father which art in heaven..." (Matthew 6:9) and in John 16 that we should pray in Jesus' name. We can also mention 1st Peter 1:17 in this context, "And if ye call on the Father, who without respect of persons judgeth ...


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HOW DARE YOU SING AMAZING GRACE AGAIN! seems to be the general response of the answers your getting. I disagree. There are prayers so recorded in the Bible for us to pray. As Protestants we like those prayers and most of us have no problem repeating them as we do not think we can improve on the way the words of Jesus change our heart and the level in which ...


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For the first replier, it certainly has nothing to do with vain repetitions, otherwise Protestants would only pray the Our Father once in their lives, yet when Jesus was teaching his disciples to pray, that is what he told them to say. The Liturgy of the Hours is not nearly as repetitious overall. I would say it was a combination of the knee-jerk reaction ...


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Your initial assertion has been proven false at least once, in the Miracle of Calanda, where God restored an amputated leg of a man some two and a half years after the amputation. And, of course, for those who consider the results of surgeons skills to be miraculous events, it happens routinely these days when limb and even faces are re-attached. I would ...


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Each Protestant body does different things. Remember, "Protestant" is not a denomination. Various bodies actually do practice it, including Lutherans. As a Lutheran, we have it in our Divine Service book. There is also the Book of Common Prayer available. We don't see it as "vain repetition", but rather a solid structure - just as many recite the Lord's ...


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Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up ...


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" THE HOLY TRINITY Our LORD JESUS CHRIST, the ONE AND ONLY TRUE GOD is called by three names, viz., GOD the FATHER; GOD the SON; and GOD the Holy Spirit. GOD the FATHER came into this world as Saviour with the name JESUS CHRIST to save sinners of the world. “...Thou art the CHRIST, the SON of the living GOD.” St. Matthew 16:16 Thus, GOD the FATHER came ...


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Asking why "some protestants" do close their prayers in a particular manner, while seemingly limited, is still quite a broad question, in fact so broad as to probably be unanswerable. I submit that it would be more profitable to ask a particular protestant why he or she ended a particular prayer with the particular formula you cite. I rather suspect that in ...


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In addition to the other excellent answers given here, Jesus gives a reason for His prayers in John 11: John 11:41b-42 “Father, I thank You that You heard Me. I know that You always hear Me, but because of the crowd standing here I said this, so they may believe You sent Me.” He said this as a prayer, after calling Lazarus out from the tomb. There was ...


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Not all "religious prayers" (What other kind of prayers are there?) are long. It depends on the denomination. For instance, in the liturgy found in the Book of Common Prayer (Anglican) the priest prays a bunch of mini prayers rather than one long one. An example of one: ALMIGHTY God, who through thine only-begotten Son Jesus Christ hast overcome death, ...


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There are several scriptures which address the subject of how we are to pray, the foremost and most well known is the Lord's prayer: All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation, unless otherwise noted. Luk 11:1 through 4 And it came to pass, that, as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto him, Lord, ...


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THE HAIL MARY The greeting of the angel Gabriel opens this prayer.It is God himself who, through his angel as intermediary, greets Mary. The grace with which Mary is filled is the presence of him who is the source of all grace. Mary is Mother of God and our mother. We can entrust all our cares and petitions to her. She prays for us as ...


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We can pray to God for anything anytime, but He is allowed to respond. The fact that we can communicate with a timeless being is itself hard to fathom. Check out this passage about Hezekiah who, upon hearing that the Assyrians would come to destroy him, prays to God. God then decides to act based on Hezekiah's prayer...or does He? Isaiah ...


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This tradition was apparently begun by Paul as a sign of respect for Christ. 1st Corinthians 11:3 and 4 KJV But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God. Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head. Paul also said that a woman ...


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One of my churches used this passage when requesting all men remove their hats during times of prayer: 1 Cor. 11:4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head. In certain cultures, it's possible that the hat is removed and head is bowed as a sign of respect and not necessarily from this verse.


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How many Gods do we have? One and only one! How many persons are there in God? Three and only three! Who are them? Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:19, NIV) Do we worship them separately? NO! Because they are ONE. ...


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There is one God who has revealed himself in three persons. The vast majority of Christians across all major sects agree that Jesus is both the Son of God and God. This has been articulated many mays, but is not easy to explain in the confines of language. He is not the "son" as is a physical offspring as the result of sexual relations, but in another ...


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Answering from the words of a saintly Pope on the right progression of memorized prayer, Pope St. John Paul II, Catechesi Tradendæ, 55. A certain memorization of the words of Jesus, of important Bible passages, of the Ten Commandments, of the formulas of profession of the faith, of the liturgical texts, of the essential prayers, of key doctrinal ...


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In Shamanism | New Advent mantras are incantations. Reciting the Holy Rosary is praying, which is raising one's mind and heart to God [cf. Penny Catechism, 141], therefore, they are diametrically opposed. From What is a Mantra?, mantras don’t have particular meanings ― they are simply 'vibrations of consciousness', therefore, there isn't any intersection ...


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I agree with Matt Gutting, and I would add that the direction of focus is an important difference. Disclaimer: I am answering from the Catholic perspective here, and my knowledge of other religions is not extensive. Edit, in response to people asking for a source. Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 2708 reads: Meditation engages thought, ...


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According to Merriam-Webster, a mantra is a sound, word, or phrase that is repeated by someone who is praying or meditating So I suppose that one might consider a Hail Mary or the other prayers used in the Rosary as a sort of mantra. Whether one would really want to depends on your view of meditation and meditative prayer. Merriam-Webster's Concise ...


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Well, that's a very good question. Bible contains several verses to understand how often should we pray, how long should our prayers be, etc... Let's consider on a first hand Matthew 26:41 : Keep on the watch and pray continually, so that you may not enter into temptation. On first reading, one might think we might always pray, that's it : ...


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If you read a little beyond vs2 in Ecl 5 you'll find this: 4 When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay that which thou hast vowed. 5 Better is it that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay This is the reason for vs 2. Don't hastily make a promise to God. You may find ...


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NEVER STOP PRAYING. (1 Thessalonians 5:17, NLT) Christians should dedicate their whole life in prayer and in holiness. There is nothing such as "Praying too much". But ... There is a difference between praying from the heart and vain repetitions. When we say prayer, many Christians misunderstand it as asking something from God. Asking is not the ...


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The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...



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