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at the "hour of our death" we may not be conscious or otherwise capable of any thought. this is when THEOTOKOS will pray for us, when we are unable to pray ourselves. the only basis i have for this is that i heard a priest say it in a sermon and it kinda stuck with me and it kinda made sense to me.


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"…pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death" has to do with asking for final perseverance, "the preservation of the state of grace till the end of life."


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The point of this passage is that the petitioner is asking for Mary, Theotokos, to pray to her Son, Jesus Christ, to assist them at that time, and at their death. It is hoped that her prayer and support will assist with the life of the petitioner, and assist them with grace to meet the Lord with final perseverance and strength. While the process of death ...


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I am a WELS Lutheran. The idea that we refuse to pray with other Christians is a carricature of us. It is not totally accurate. My pastor says that public prayer is always off limits but private prayer is something that requires a bit of discretion. I have a good example of something that happened in our church. The parocial school that is attached to ...


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The first case of prayer to the departed saints is documented in the divine liturgy. In the New Testaments prayer through the departed are mentioned in 2 Tim 1:16-18 (Paul prayed for Onesiphorus) and in Revelation 5:8 (Saints in Heaven receive prayers). As a former Calvinist I used to read these passages in isolation to how that texts were read and ...


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Joyce Baldwin's commentary on Daniel says (pg. 129): Verse 10 supplies welcome evidence concerning prayer habits during the later biblical period. Windows . . . open toward Jerusalem is a literal understanding of Solomon's petition [at the dedication of the temple], 'When [foreigners] hear about your great reputation and your ability to ...


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Amen is a derivative from the Hebrew verb aman "to strengthen" or "Confirm". The word Amen is one of a small number of Hebrew words which have been imported unchanged into the liturgy of the Church, propter sanctiorem as St. Augustine expresses it, in virtue of an exceptionally sacred example. "So frequent was this Hebrew in the mouth of Our ...


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The mere fact that this youtuber thought Amen-Ra was a Roman God speaks greatly about the quality of his videos. Some unbelievers seem to see a pagan behind everything a Christian does. Old English, from ecclesiastical Latin, from Greek amēn, from Hebrew 'āmēn ‘truth, certainty’, used adverbially as expression of agreement, and adopted in the ...


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The use of the "Amen" comes from the last word of the most used Bible Translations. The word itself in the original Greek is Amēn Ἀμήν⧽ Amen from the Hebrew which means "true". The following is a quote from Smith's Bible dictionary. A'men. Literally "true" and used as a substantive, "that which is true",. "truth", Isa_65:16, a word used in strong ...


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Amen is an interjection associated with the Hebrew words for truth and dependability, it conveys the idea of agreement or emphasis, and its meaning can be translated different ways depending on the context.



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