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Your questions are little difficult to follow, but I will address the questions I see. Let's start with an understanding of what prayer is. In simple terms, praying is talking, or having a conversation with God.So anything you want to say to God is prayer, not just requests. That would certainly include thanksgiving. Here is a definition from a biblical ...


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An Official version is available On Line from the Vatican This link takes you to the compendium of the catechism of the Catholic Church which is hosted at the Vatican's web page. In Appendix A, Common Prayers, the Gloria Patri is rendered with Latin next to English. English: Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was ...


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The Vulgate Psalm 83:5 has saecula saeculorum, so I suppose a useful starting point would be an Anglo-Saxon psalter, as these did exist whereas vernacular Bibles didn't; but I can't find one online. Wycliffe (around 1390) translated Ps 84:5† into Late Middle English as "into the worlds of worlds", which is a fairly literal rendering of the Latin. ...


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The question is not clear. If you hold the beads flat, there's a "direction" ( e.g. clockwise), but if they hang down e.g. while standing to pray, how would you tell which way is which? There's never an order marked on the beads. It's not even particularly strict that one must say the 3 Aves, Paternoster and Creed before the decades, as opposed to after.


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I don't think there's any official C of E doctrine about this. I think it's worth remembering that prayer is not any kind of magic spell, and that the Almighty is not bound by space and time. Conversing with the Lord about what you'd like to happen is one thing; being disgruntled when you don't get what you asked for, as if the Lord were a genie from a ...



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