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9

There is indeed much evidence that silent prayer was taught and practiced in the early church. Several examples from the first few centuries will demonstrate this: Clement of Alexandria (150–215) writes: Prayer is, then, to speak more boldly, converse with God. Though whispering, consequently, and not opening the lips, we speak in silence, yet we cry ...


8

There are two main Protestant arguments against asking the deceased saints to intercede for us: It is seen as contradicting the Bible's prohibition on contacting the dead. These are found most clearly in the Jewish Law, which is not binding on Christians, but is still considered to be solid wisdom in this case. Do not turn to mediums or seek out ...


7

The difficulty in answering this question is that the liturgy of the early Church was largely oral in nature, and so we contain virtually no records from the early Church itself regarding what it exactly did in its own liturgy. Contrary to the author who posted the quote you use, if we have evidence of the Lord's Prayer in use even several centuries later ...


7

Prayers that are supposed to automatically release souls from purgatory are "declared to be apocryphal" (i.e. false) and are prohibited, according to the Acts of the Holy See 32 p.243, as promulgated by Pope Leo XIII. Reiicienda sunt folia, et libelli, in quibus promittitur fidelibus unam alteramve precem recitantibus liberatio unius vel plurium animarum ...


6

As far as the Hebrew הִתְפַּלֵּל (hitpallēl) goes, I’m pretty sure1 the only example of prayer clearly directed at people (rather than God/gods) is Isaiah 45:14, which doesn’t come across as "pray" in most translations I’ve looked at, presumably because the idea is troubling. Thus says the LORD: “The wealth of Egypt and the merchandise of Cush, ...


6

Part of the answer can be found in Colossians 1:24. Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ's afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the Church. The question a Christian must answer is, "What is lacking in Christ's afflictions?" I think most would agree that nothing at all is lacking, ...


5

Thanks for your question. While the Wikipedia page is an adequate description, I recommend you also look at the webpage of the Christian Science church itself to see how they describe their own beliefs to the public, Www.ChristianScience.com. And you can refer to Science & Health with Key to the Scriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy for the complete explanation ...


4

1883. The earliest printed example I have found specifically referring to the acronym ACTS is from a serial story by "Marion Harland" (Mary Virginia Terhune) that was printed in an August 8, 1883 publication of the periodical The Continent: Our Mr. Burgess once informed a youthful theologue in my hearing that "the monosyllable 'ACTS' formed an excellent ...


4

The spacing on the beads are the same in both directions. You do not even need beads, I use an app on my phone, i'm techno savy. You can use your fingers and keep track of the mysteries that way. I have prayed the Rosary many times before Mass, hardly anyone has the beads as they pray together. There are many ways to pray the Rosary. Many things to ...


4

Ravi Zacharias sort of assumes (but I don't think ever tries to prove) that God is sovereign, and in that sovereignty has decided to give us wills of our own. To begin the chapter "Does Prayer Make Any Difference?" in Zacharias' book Has Christianity Failed You? Zacharias states that Christianity does not promise that you will have every question fully ...


4

While there may be some differences in how some particular Christian groups respond in such a situation, it's safe to say that the vast majority will not be offended by what you're doing. Bowing your head is certainly a sign of respect - primarily to God, but also to the community you are with. In most cases it would be neither here nor there if you close ...


3

One clue to the meaning comes from the introductory words to the prayer: Through Mary’s unblemished hands and the Divine Heart of Jesus, I offer... In other words, the pray-er is only able to offer what he offers through someone else's action or intercession. In this case, the reason we are able to offer Jesus' sacrifice is because it was done on our ...


3

The Tie Between Luther and Augustine Luther entered an Augustinian monastery when he became a monk, so it is not surprising that he was heavily influenced by Augustine. An excellent survey of the one real letter we have of Augustine's that treats his overall view of prayer (not specifically applied to the study of the Bible) is in the 4 Principles on ...


3

Those on earth do not know with certainty whether one is in hell, purgatory, or heaven—unless the Church has canonized the faithfully departed as a saint, in which case one is certain he or she is in heaven. Thus, Catholics pray for departed souls in the case they might be in purgatory: …the Catholic Church, instructed by the Holy Ghost, has, from the ...


2

It seems the "anything" is to apply to the binding and loosing. Those two or three, or more, who have come and gathered in agreement to discipline the unrepentant person, they are asking that in accordance with their conclusion, that person is to be bound, removed from fellowship. Understanding that, you then have to speculate what is God's part in this ...


2

What is the Biblical argument used by Evangelical Christians against the Catholic doctrine of the invocation of the saints? We can see a principle of equality with other Christians (and even angels) in our work for the Lord that would preclude elevated status for some. Revelation 19:10 And I fell at his feet to worship him. And he said unto me, See ...


2

You already mentioned that you had seen support for this in the Apocrypha (otherwise known as the Deuterocannonical text). As such, it became a Tradition to ask the Saints for intercessory prayers, because of the belief that they can in fact pray for us. And on top of that... my question is if there is biblical authority to support the proposition ...


2

I did a little research and I found some answers. Through his intercessory ministry in heaven and through the Mass, Jesus continues to offer himself to his Father as a living sacrifice, and he does so in what the Church specifically states is "an unbloody manner"—one that does not involve a new crucifixion. "Do this in remembrance of me" can also ...


2

This might be semi-authoritative since it comes straight from the only approved Marian apparition site in the United States. Up near Green Bay, Wisconsin there is an outdoor rosary walk with the opposite mysteries for people of the sinister disposition. For instance, when you walk around clockwise, you see 1st glorious mystery, 1st luminous. Etc... On a ...


2

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia article for the Doxology, it was used at least as early as the fourth century "as a protest against Arian subordination. The article goes on to say that in the West, the Latin version was put into a canonical form at the Fourth Synod of Toledo in 633.


2

Perhaps you are thinking of "The Interior Castle" by St. Teresa of Avila, Doctor of the Catholic Church? On page 77 of the document at this link, the introduction to the 3rd Chapter, she specifically cites 2 Cor. xii. 2-4. This sounds to me close to your question, though this is not the final stage of perfection in that book.


2

Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P., in his Three Ages of the Interior Life (part III, ch. XIII, B. "The Union of Humility and Christian Dignity"): In his commentary on this chapter of the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, St. Thomas speaks admirably of the union of humility and magnanimity in St. Paul. He writes as follows: “As charity is the root of the ...


2

It is more than acceptable for Christians to pray without ceasing and also for the same intentions. The Scriptures tell us to "pray without ceasing" 1Thessalonians. Luke 18:1-8New International Version (NIV) The Parable of the Persistent Widow (Luke 18:1-8) is another fine example. 18 Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should ...


2

The Catholic Church believes that souls who die in the state of grace, yet still need to be purified from the temporal punishment due to sin are purified in Purgatory. Catholic teaching regarding prayers of the dead is bound up inseparably with the doctrine of purgatory and the more general doctrine of the communion of the saints, which is an article of the ...


1

An Official version is available On Line from the Vatican This link takes you to the compendium of the catechism of the Catholic Church which is hosted at the Vatican's web page. In Appendix A, Common Prayers, the Gloria Patri is rendered with Latin next to English. English: Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was ...


1

The original text is καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν (Matthew 6:13). which translates literally as And do not lead us into a trial. The key word is πειρασμός, which, according to Strong’s Greek concordance, can mean an experiment, a trial, or temptation. (It is derived from πειράζω, which means essentially “to test.”) It is not necessary ...


1

To me, this question boils down to the following: Is it logically possible that "prayers for the past" or "retroactive prayers" are efficacious, given a Reformed perspective In other words, does it make any sense (either logically or theologically) to pray for something which might already be "set in stone" as a part of history. I address that in the ...


1

The question correctly emphasizes that intercession of the saints and invocation of the saints are not the same doctrines. Both are taught in Catholicism but only the former is taught in Evangelical Christianity. The New Testament is explicit that the saints in heaven intercedes for the saints on earth: "And the smoke of the incense of the prayers of ...


1

I don't think there's any official C of E doctrine about this. I think it's worth remembering that prayer is not any kind of magic spell, and that the Almighty is not bound by space and time. Conversing with the Lord about what you'd like to happen is one thing; being disgruntled when you don't get what you asked for, as if the Lord were a genie from a lamp,...


1

I think this is a misunderstanding of the purpose of prayer, and as such, no such prayer will be answered, in general. However, we must bear in mind that Christianity is not about rules so much as it is about your relationship with God. Someone who has spend a lot of time building his relationship with God and learning to be obedient to God so as to grow ...



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