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Those on earth do not know with certainty whether one is in hell, purgatory, or heaven—unless the Church has canonized the faithfully departed as a saint, in which case one is certain he or she is in heaven. Thus, Catholics pray for departed souls in the case they might be in purgatory: …the Catholic Church, instructed by the Holy Ghost, has, from the ...


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The Catholic Church believes that souls who die in the state of grace, yet still need to be purified from the temporal punishment due to sin are purified in Purgatory. Catholic teaching regarding prayers of the dead is bound up inseparably with the doctrine of purgatory and the more general doctrine of the communion of the saints, which is an article of the ...


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According to the Catholic Encyclopedia article for the Doxology, it was used at least as early as the fourth century "as a protest against Arian subordination. The article goes on to say that in the West, the Latin version was put into a canonical form at the Fourth Synod of Toledo in 633.


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As is recounted here, both are considered legitimate translations, although they are typically found in different contexts: The "will be forever" form is found in most translations when playing the Liturgy of the Hours. The "world without end" form, is more common (being the older translation) in other contexts. That's the one that was taught when I was in ...


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I am LDS. When a person stands and offers a prayer as the representative of a congregation of people---we say, Our Heavenly Father, but when we are praying only representing ourself (not speaking in behalf of all humanity), we don't need to say, OUR, because we are speaking personally to My Father. When said this way, we are not discrediting that all have ...



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