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12

While I believe there are political reasons to support or not support Israel, I don't feel any of those are "Christian" reasons to support Israel. God has blessed Israel and therefore is guiding them, in general, in the correct direction, and we should support this. Israel is a Jewish state. Unless God is guiding the people to follow Jesus, I'm ...


10

Christians throughout history have differing interpretations of how the faithful should approach civil governments. I would point you toward a seminal work addressing this topic called Christ and Culture by H. R. Niebuhr. One position (Christ against culture), advocated by those like Mennonites, argues for total withdraw from the political sphere. Another ...


9

When I hear Libertarians talking about how each person's only responsibility is to themselves, I tend to think of Cain. When God asked him where his murdered brother was, he flippantly responded, "Am I my brother's keeper?" (It's not my responsibilty to look after him! He ought to take care of himself!) I don't think most Christians would consider him good ...


9

Actually it's the other way round: More studies: http://freethinker.co.uk/2009/02/18/poorest-countries-are-the-most-religious/ http://www.zahablog.com/?page_id=782


9

They don't "relate to the US", except insofar as the headquarters of the church happen to be located in the US. There aren't "international branches" of the LDS church; there is one worldwide church. The church is organized into individual congregations, known as wards or branches (a branch being a smaller congregation in an area where the church is not yet ...


9

This issue isn't really anything to do with Christianity, although it's an issue which Christians sometimes take sides on. When the State of Israel was created in 1947-48 Jerusalem was given a special status, not a part of Israel proper: "The City of Jerusalem shall be established as a corpus separatum under a special international regime and shall be ...


8

From a general Christian perspective, I believe that assisted suicide is wrong. I have multiple reasons for this. The obvious, but too obvious, answer is that God commands that we shall not murder. A common objection to this argument is that it's not murder if the person is suffering and wishes to die. Perhaps so, so allow me to argue a separate point. ...


8

I think this has to do with whether biblical laws should apply to non-Christians or not. 1 Corinthians 5:12-13 (ESV) 12 For what have I to do with judging outsiders? Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge? 13 God judges those outside. "Purge the evil person from among you." So, we should not seek to judge outsiders. Not even by ...


7

Without having understood the doctrine of the two kingdoms, it's not possible to understand Luther's theology in its full extent. It's a misunderstanding to think that by the justification by faith alone all laws have lost their importance. As short as possible: a Christian lives under two completly different kingdoms, where the one is "God's kingdom under ...


7

Catholicism does not keep a comprehensive list of what does and does not constitute a sin; there are too many actions with moral consequence to allow for such a list. Although the Catechism of the Catholic Church does point out several actions (including procuring an abortion) as sins, even grave sins, it says nothing specifically about voting for candidates ...


6

It would be wrong to think that a majority of Protestants are Zionists, but Christian Zionism is nevertheless a substantial movement, especially in the United States. There is a belief among some Christians that the return of the Jews to the Holy Land, and the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, is in accordance with Biblical prophecy. The idea ...


5

There are a host of "end times" prophecies that cover Israel, in both figurative and literal senses, and that God is not "done with her" yet. The clear list, along with debated lists, would be far too long enumerate herein. We know that Israel as God's chosen people was fulfilled in the coming of Christ, and that as a nation per se, they do not hold the ...


5

The charges being brought against Jesus was that he was "King of the Jews", meaning that he claimed earthly authority over the Jews. The charges, therefore, were charges against the authority of Rome. You can see this more clearly if you read the full passage (using your source translation): John 18:33 (NWT) So Pilate entered into the governor’s ...


5

The question is very well addressed in a guide published by Catholic Answers. In a nutshell, the answer is that a Catholic (and, frankly, every human being, regardless of religion) is bound in conscience never to support public policies that encourage abortion, and this duty includes the grave obligation to vote for those candidates who will best protect ...


5

The commandment (Exodus 20) "Thou shalt not steal" implies the right to private property, and this is everywhere assumed in Scripture (even in Acts 5 ). If princes had the unlimited right to tax, to any extent and for any purpose, there could be no private property. All would belong to the state, or to the prince personally. Since this is not so, there must ...


4

The issue comes down to the difference between the church and the government. If Jesus was speaking to the government when he spoke the golden rule, then yes, there would be a conflict. If he was speaking to individuals within the church, I don't believe there's a conflict at all. If a person holds that the Golden Rule was given to those who follow ...


4

There isn't much evidence to support this hypothesis. The countries with the top ten incomes per capita are a mix of Islamic, Atheist (at least trending that way now; historically Christian), Christian, and Buddhist. If you look at a broader trend across countries, the U.S. is a highly-religious outlier, but basically the trend is downwards; the more ...


3

I look at it from a different point-of-view. Should another religious group, perhaps animists, or we could go with a non-religious group such as vegans, push their views, if they had the majority? So, if the majority of those in power were vegans, and they passed a law banning any meat or products from animals not willingly given (so honey for example ...


3

For one, Catholic Priest are bound by canon law not to participate in politics. They are not to play an active role in political parties or in directing trade unions unless, in the judgement of the competent ecclesiastical authority, this is required for the defence of the rights of the Church or to promote the common good. Source I have heard, from ...


3

Depending on what you mean by "involved in politics" - perhaps. Certainly if you look at the history of both Israel and the early church you will see many examples of those "in politics" who were also redeemed (Paul writes that the household of Caesar greets those to whom he is writing in Philippians). Likewise, Nehemiah was cupbearer to the king, and ...


3

There is no doctrine, policy or convention in the Catholic church that prevents a priest, or any church leader, from pronouncing on the rightness of some action or belief. Historically, over the last thousand years or so, the Pope and other church leaders have pronounced on the policies and conduct of many world leaders. In recent times the Pope has ...


3

There are no requirements in the New Testament for the establishment of or abolishment of socio-economic classes, so to the most basic aspect of your question, they can exist or not. There are a few issues to address however. To begin, consider that elements of redistribution are seen directly in Acts: 32 Now the full number of those who believed ...


2

The problem comes in that if we are to deem all life with intrinsic value then we are faced with the same problem that abortion and the death penalty brings. Do we succumb to nihilism and then deem the life of certain convicts and / or unborn babies is worthless or do we reject nihilism and deem that it has worth. Do we grant the doctors the right to end ...


2

Creator and Lord I suppose the Biblical basis for Theonomy begins with the fact that God created everything and everyone, and is therefore Lord of all creation. "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth." (Genesis 1:1, NASB) "Worthy are You, our Lord and our God, to receive glory and honor and power; for You created all things, and ...


2

This is actually a question I asked at my church during the last election season. I'll break this down into 2 parts Voting: I don't see any scriptural support for or against it. I reject the notion that it is a sin not to vote, as I haven't heard any sound scriptural evidence. I have heard people use "Pray for your leaders" (1 Tim 2:2) and "Submit to ...


2

I've never found something that would really suggest we have a Christian obligation to take part in politics, or not to take part. As far as voting, democracy is a relatively recent innovation. To whatever extent there was a sense of civic participation and responsibility, it was generally focused on the local community, not the government.



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