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16

Simply - you participate in a bigger population, many of whom do not accept Christ (or do so as a historical figure only). Nothing more, nothing less. I don't see it as sacrilege, but personally I also don't have an opinion on the change. I'm not a believer, but AD vs CE is of little significance to me. In reality, it is exceptionally rare that I refer to ...


12

My experience is that this form of political correctness is an over-reaction against something that isn't really a problem anyway, and is intended to appease people who are offended by Christianity--most likely a small minority of vocal athiests and those with similar political views. I am never/would never be offended when a Jew wishes me a "Happy Hanukkah,...


8

Since the actual date of Jesus' birth is in considerable dispute (I think 4 BCE is a commonly accepted date, but by no means certain), this terminology is more accurate. They're just labels for convinence: it doesn't really matter what event they're pinned on. The division of the calendar in this fashion was certainly derived from religious belief, but in ...


4

I believe the BCE is more to do with accurate representation of times. What if (God forbid, literally) that Christianity was wiped out on Earth? Then AD/BC wouldn't have the same meaning to people, but BCE/CE still maintains its understanding. What if we started using the Islamic calendar? It probably greatly offended Jews when people started using AD/BC ...


3

At least two churches have decided to abstain from referring to God exclusively as "he". The United Church of Christ. The Eleventh General Synod instructed that a Book of Worship be developed and characterized by language that is truly inclusive with respect to God and to people. Although the generic use of masculine terms has been accepted practice, it ...


3

As one of the supposedly-offended here, allow me to add a perspective: I am not in the least bit offended by anyone wishing me a happy Christmas; nor would I be in the least bit offended by friends an associates wishing me a happy Eid etc. Or new year, or Chinese new year. In fact I dislike intensely any attempt to hide the names in the sake of political (in)...


3

I believe the AD term is the one that primarily prompted the division. AD stands for Anno Domini, which is medieval latin for "In the Year of Our Lord". That's pretty clearly exclusive to those who believe that Jesus Christ is the son of G-d. Therefore, its widespread use ignores the beliefs of every non-Christian religion, as well as atheists and ...



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