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14

It is simply Greek that has been written in Roman letters. The city of Rome was essentially bilingual from around the time of Caesar Augustus until at least the third or fourth century A.D.: the people spoke mostly vulgar Latin or common (Koine) Greek. Greek was the more common language among the poor, who formed the majority of the ranks of the Church at ...


13

In many ancient cultures, Hebrew included, the number seven often signifies completeness and/or perfection (for more information see either Numerical Sayings in the OT, W. Roth or IVP New Bible Dictionary, ed. Marshall, Miller, Packer, Wiseman, p834). Therefore, it is often used in an emphatic sense. This is seen in Peter's question: "should I forgive seven ...


12

Augustine of Hippo is basically universally credited with the coinage of the phrase. It is an idea which can easily be supported by the Bible, but he was the first to say it in a form close to its present proverbial form. He probably didn't think he was coining a cliche, since it was neatly hidden away in a letter to a convent. This blog has a summary of the ...


11

Your two examples are two different numbers. Lamech speaks of seventy-seven times (77), while Jesus says seventy times seven (490). It's hard to say exactly what Lamech meant, as his story is badly incomplete--it doesn't say who he killed or why, or what happened after that. So it's difficult to draw any conclusions here. As for Jesus's answer to Peter, ...


9

Calvin The first extant writing to contain the phrase is John Calvin's Antidote to the Council of Trent (1547). First, for context, Calvin was responding to Canon 11 of the sixth session of the Council of Trent (which you can read at the above link): Whosoever shall say that men are justified by the mere imputation of Christ's righteousness, or by the ...


7

The phrase “dark night of the soul” comes from a poem by St. John of the Cross (1542-1591), a Spanish Carmelite monk and mystic, whose Noche obscura del alma is translated “The Dark Night of the Soul.” Its meant to be synonymous with traveling the “narrow way” that Jesus spoke of in Matthew 7:13-14. So no, it is not mentioned in the Bible. Sources: ...


5

I've also answered the cross-posted version of this question on the Latin Language Stack Exchange. One common attribution for this phrase is Thomas à Kempis's Imitation of Christ (~1420), which reads: Tell me, where now are all the masters and teachers whom you knew so well in life and who were famous for their learning? Others have already taken their ...


5

The mother of Christ was specifically called "blessed" at least as far back as the end of the second century AD, and given the title "the Blessed Virgin" at least as far back as the early fifth century. CCEL.org, the Christian Classics Ethereal Library, lists several references for "blessed Mary" from the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew. For example: And when ...


5

It did indeed, though not that exact phrase. It was St. Augustine in his Letter 211 (A.D. 423), in point number 11: ... If she refuse to submit to this, and does not go away from you of her own accord, let her be expelled from your society. For this is not done cruelly but mercifully, to protect very many from perishing through infection of the plague ...


4

To me, the first consideration in answering your question is to identify exactly what the phrase means. It is easy enough to imagine that the phrase is used to mean that God wants us all to have "Hallmark" (R) moments--"When you care enough to send the very best". When you go to the butcher, God wants you to buy Prime grade instead of choice grade beef, ...


4

The theological term for the concept you are thinking of, namely that Christ was payment for our sins and so took upon Himself the fullness of punishment due to sin, is known as penal substitution (as you identify). Penal substitution is largely originated in the Reform Movement. It is generally agreed that no Church father taught penal substitution, but ...


3

The words the dark night of the soul are not, to the best of my knowledge, in the Bible. The phenomenon as experienced by real people in real situations is in the Bible, however. One need only think about saints under the old covenant who struggled with what we today would call depression, which is I suggest, one aspect of the dark night of the soul. Perhaps ...


3

It could also be that on the Eucharist, in some depictions, the letters IHS are spelled.


2

To be clear (at the risk of being blunt), the thought that "faith alone saves, but never remains alone" (the great 'licet numquam sit sola" phrase) is not just attributed to Luther, but it is spoken by luther in various shapes and forms early and often. In Luther's series on faith (1520) he writes: 14: Works infallibly follow justifying faith, since ...


2

The exact origin is unknown because it seems to have originated from slang. In the Autobiography of Mark Twain, Mark mentions that Jesus H Christ had old origins that were unknown.


2

Historically there are two options: There is only one Logos, both Christ and Scripture are one in nature. But this lead to a problematic question, How Christians explain their belief that Christ is worshiped and Scripture is not while both are identical in nature as God's singular Word? Matt Gutting in a chat room discussion refer to Catechism of Catholic ...


2

I don't know the original source, but if it is based on Scripture (which certainly seems plausible), here are some passages which may relate: When [the beggar] saw Peter and John about to go into the temple, he began asking to receive alms. ...But Peter said, “I do not possess silver and gold, but what I do have I give to you: In the name of Jesus Christ ...


1

Is the phrase “God wants the best for us” biblical? Yes. The problem often arises in that we can have a different idea of what "best" is than God does. For Christians, we can see this desire expressed in the letter to the Romans; Romans 8:28 And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called ...


1

Fredsbend the definitions in my post below of "blessed" are clearly applicable to MARY, at least implicitly and intrinsically by the definitions and thus retroactively, since Gospel and early church times. Interestingly high Mariology is found in Methodist tradition also mutatis mutandis. "Some Methodists, including John Wesley, believe that the Virgin Mary ...


1

The only reference I could find concerned Jonathan Edwards. Originating from The Biographical Dictionary of Evangelicals, I found the following site reference: However, in 1721 he came to the conviction, one he called a "delightful conviction." He was meditating on 1 Timothy 1:17, and later remarked, "As I read the words, there came into my soul, and was ...



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