Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

In many ancient cultures, Hebrew included, the number seven often signifies completeness and/or perfection (for more information see either Numerical Sayings in the OT, W. Roth or IVP New Bible Dictionary, ed. Marshall, Miller, Packer, Wiseman, p834). Therefore, it is often used in an emphatic sense. This is seen in Peter's question: "should I forgive seven ...


11

Augustine of Hippo is basically universally credited with the coinage of the phrase. It is an idea which can easily be supported by the Bible, but he was the first to say it in a form close to its present proverbial form. He probably didn't think he was coining a cliche, since it was neatly hidden away in a letter to a convent. This blog has a summary of the ...


10

Your two examples are two different numbers. Lamech speaks of seventy-seven times (77), while Jesus says seventy times seven (490). It's hard to say exactly what Lamech meant, as his story is badly incomplete--it doesn't say who he killed or why, or what happened after that. So it's difficult to draw any conclusions here. As for Jesus's answer to Peter, ...


7

The phrase “dark night of the soul” comes from a poem by St. John of the Cross (1542-1591), a Spanish Carmelite monk and mystic, whose Noche obscura del alma is translated “The Dark Night of the Soul.” Its meant to be synonymous with traveling the “narrow way” that Jesus spoke of in Matthew 7:13-14. So no, it is not mentioned in the Bible. Sources: ...


5

It did indeed, though not that exact phrase. It was St. Augustine in his Letter 211 (A.D. 423), in point number 11: ... If she refuse to submit to this, and does not go away from you of her own accord, let her be expelled from your society. For this is not done cruelly but mercifully, to protect very many from perishing through infection of the plague ...


5

The mother of Christ was specifically called "blessed" at least as far back as the end of the second century AD, and given the title "the Blessed Virgin" at least as far back as the early fifth century. CCEL.org, the Christian Classics Ethereal Library, lists several references for "blessed Mary" from the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew. For example: And when ...


4

Apostle Paul in the book of Ephesians continues this thought known as the “Christocentric” principle. This principle introduces Christ in us the hope of Glory. To me it means that we live our lives with Christ being the center of it, and by doing so we find ourselves taking on a new life in Christ. As Paul stated in Acts 17:28, “In Him we live, and move, ...


3

The meaning is given in the context of John 15:1-7. There, Jesus is likening himself to a vine. His illustration is simple: as long as the branches remain in the trunk of the vine, then they continue to take nourishment from the trunk. So if we continue to depend on Christ and not be moved away from him, then he will feed our spiritual lives and we will ...


3

The words the dark night of the soul are not, to the best of my knowledge, in the Bible. The phenomenon as experienced by real people in real situations is in the Bible, however. One need only think about saints under the old covenant who struggled with what we today would call depression, which is I suggest, one aspect of the dark night of the soul. Perhaps ...


3

It could also be that on the Eucharist, in some depictions, the letters IHS are spelled.


2

The exact origin is unknown because it seems to have originated from slang. In the Autobiography of Mark Twain, Mark mentions that Jesus H Christ had old origins that were unknown.


2

I don't know the original source, but if it is based on Scripture (which certainly seems plausible), here are some passages which may relate: When [the beggar] saw Peter and John about to go into the temple, he began asking to receive alms. ...But Peter said, “I do not possess silver and gold, but what I do have I give to you: In the name of Jesus Christ ...


1

Fredsbend the definitions in my post below of "blessed" are clearly applicable to MARY, at least implicitly and intrinsically by the definitions and thus retroactively, since Gospel and early church times. Interestingly high Mariology is found in Methodist tradition also mutatis mutandis. "Some Methodists, including John Wesley, believe that the Virgin ...


1

The only reference I could find concerned Jonathan Edwards. Originating from The Biographical Dictionary of Evangelicals, I found the following site reference: However, in 1721 he came to the conviction, one he called a "delightful conviction." He was meditating on 1 Timothy 1:17, and later remarked, "As I read the words, there came into my soul, and was ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible