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The answer, in short, is that recognizing the centrality of man is far from outdated and cannot be branded as mere “anthropocentrism.” Man is qualitatively different from and, in fact, superior to all other material creatures, and this fact can be shown by a relatively easy philosophical reflection. (I will preface my answer by saying that I understood the ...


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Yes. In his book, The Problem of Pain, popular Christian author C.S. Lewis discusses Adam's sin in the context of Scientific understanding of his time, which included Darwinism. He presents an understanding in which those creatures, guided by the hand of God, became man. Despite Lewis' prominence in twentieth century Christianity, this particular viewpoint ...


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The problem is known as "theodicy". Actually, this is just one portion of the problem of theodicy, but it's part of the "How can a good God permit evil?" question. "How God could create beings that will go to Hell" is subset of the problem of theodicy. This is one of the most commonly covered questions in the field of Apologetics. A Bing/Google/(Choose ...


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Anselm of Canterbury attempts to do exactly this in his Monologion, an 11th century work that attempts to logically deduce God's existence and attributes without the use of Scripture. Overview in Proslogion Anselm's later and better-known work, Proslogion, provides a helpful summary: after establishing the existence of God through the ontological argument ...


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The Catechism of the Catholic Church has this to say with regard to the soul itself: In Sacred Scripture the term "soul" often refers to human life or the entire human person. But "soul" also refers to the innermost aspect of man, that which is of greatest value in him, that by which he is most especially in God's image: "soul" signifies the spiritual ...


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Another possible interpretation is offered by the 20th Century Catholic theologian Karl Rahner. In Foundations of the Christian Faith he argues that original sin can be thought of as the result of how all humanity is interconnected with one another. The example he uses is buying a banana. Not, on the surface, a "sinful" decision. But if, at the other end of ...


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St. Thomas Aquinas, in his Summa Theologiæ ("Sum of Theologies"), answers the question "Whether the trinity of the divine persons can be known by natural reason?" by saying: It is impossible to attain to the knowledge of the Trinity by natural reason. For, as above explained (Question [12], Articles [4],12), man cannot obtain the knowledge of God by ...


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At least a couple pericopae come to my mind, if not to Clive Staples Lewis. In the context of Paul's contrast between the finite and prideful wisdom of man versus the infinite and hidden-from-the-wise wisdom of God, Paul said, ". . . but we speak . . . the wisdom which none of the rulers of this age has understood; for if they had understood it they ...


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I have been reading Girard for a while. His theory has transformed the way I understand Christianity completely. I can't praise his work enough. At first glance the mimetic theory may appear at odds with the penal substitution atonement, especially if you stop at his book "Things Hidden" where he calls his view the "non sacrificial" approach. He was ...



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