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Origin - Loci Communes Theologici, 1521 A.D. The words notitia, assensus, and fiducia applied to faith originates with the Reformers of the 16th Century. Martin Luther argued that saving faith or true faith is a fides viva, a vital or living faith (Sproul, 2010, pg.47). This concept was further explicated by one of Luther's contemporaries, Philip ...


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If God, were only transcendant, perhaps there would be something to what you're saying, But Orthodox (in the wider sense of the word) Christian teaching is that God is both transcendant (we can't know Him fully) and Immanent - he is 'close' and fully able to communicate to his creatures clearly (at least to their level of comprehension). Orthodox ...


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The problem is known as "theodicy". Actually, this is just one portion of the problem of theodicy, but it's part of the "How can a good God permit evil?" question. "How God could create beings that will go to Hell" is subset of the problem of theodicy. This is one of the most commonly covered questions in the field of Apologetics. A Bing/Google/(Choose ...


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Neo-Platonism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoplatonism_and_Christianity). Augustine was influenced by Neo-Platonism, as well as other Christian writers. I think you will find Neo-Platonism to be more more influential than Platonism. I am not expert in Philosophy enough to provide my own explanation. All I can do is provide some references. From the ...


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Plantinga is definitely a Calvinist, though most Calvinists would call him an inconsistent one. Reformed teaching plays a very significant, if at-times tangential, role in much of his work. (For example his work on epistemology is known as Reformed Epistemology) He's known for Molinism because of his books God, Freedom & Evil and The Nature of Necessity ...


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In a word: no, especially to your question number three. Allow me to put my answer in the form of an argument, one which Jesus himself used on many occasions. If God has no problem or difficulty whatsoever communicating within the infinite Godhead of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and does so with no falsification, no limitation (self-imposed or ...


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Christian morality has historically tended to be regarded as absolute, leaving no room for a fact-value distinction, although some modern philosophers would disagree. R. Scott Smith argues in In Search of Moral Knowledge: Overcoming the Fact-Value Dichotomy, page 18, there are at least a few moral truths we do not know, which means that, strictly speaking, ...


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Cynicism has traditionally been attributed to Antisthenes, a student of Socrates. I'm not very familiar with Antisthenes, but the main current of Socrates' thought was extreme skepticism about all knowledge; the oracle said that there was no one wiser than Socrates, which Socrates, after some initial confusion, took to mean that he was wiser simply because ...


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Your definition of cynicism includes " rejecting all conventional desires for A. wealth, B. power, C. sex, and D. fame." A. Regarding wealth- His Father owns the cattle on a thousand hills- Proverbs and He miraculously fished a coin out of a fish's mouth. www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+17%3A24-27&version=CEV Any possible possession he ...


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"Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love." It's simple, it is the essence of Christianity. A non-christian cannot love as a christian because christian love is a love that goes against our human nature. Our human nature tells us to love those who love us and hate those who hate us. But God's love says do good to those who persecute you, ...



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