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13

One of the defining tenets of Protestant Christianity is sola scriptura--that the Scriptures are the fundamental basis for all doctrine. This is in contrast to extra-biblical teachings. The idea is that if it were important enough for us to know, God would have told us in the Scriptures themselves and not have us rely on extra-biblical teachings. ...


12

The Bible does emphatically state that Jesus was without sin. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Hebrews 4:15 ESV Since Jesus was never reported to have been married in the Bible, a sexual relationship would have been a sin. ...


11

There is no clear biblical evidence for the non-Virginity of Mary. The Bible never says he had full blooded brothers and sisters. I don't want to delve into translations which I don't understand (Aramaic words for niece, cousin, nephew, etc...), but it is clear that Jesus does however call many people his brothers, and exhorts us all to call others our ...


10

The importance of the perpetual virginity of Mary lies in the scriptural parallelism between Mary and the Ark of Covenant. The Ark: Journeys to a town in the hills of Judah (II Samuel 6:2) It is greeted with awe “How can the ark of the LORD ever come to me?” (II Samuel 6:9 KJV) It remains at the house of Obed-Edom for three months (II Samuel 6:11) ...


9

The doctrine of the perpetual virginity of Mary is tradition (mostly Roman Catholic), but actually not in Scripture at all. (I'm not taking a stand on that doctrine for purposes of this question, just pointing out that even Roman Catholics would not, I believe make the case from Scripture.) It mentions that at the time Jesus was conceived by the Holy ...


8

One answer that has been suggested is the Infancy Gospel of James (AKA The Protoevangelium of James). This document dates to roughly the middle of the second century and focuses largely on the person of Mary from her birth to the birth of Jesus. As the central character, Mary's honor and purity are defended in great detail. Mary's virginity is repeatedly ...


8

The Catholic "tradition" is just that. It is not an official teaching or doctrine, but rather something one is free to believe. The Church does not take a physiological stance on whether or not Mary experienced pain during child birth. But to understand where this tradition came from, we have to go back to the Garden of Eden. When Adam and Eve sinned, God ...


7

Luke records Mary's faith on the occasion of the Annunciation (Luke 1:26-56). Gabriel informs her (v35) that "the child to be born will be holy; he will be called Son of God", and she replies (v38) "let it be done to me according to your word". When Elizabeth addresses her as "the mother of my Lord" (v43), Mary proclaims with the Magnificat (vv46-55), ...


7

John 21:25: Jesus did many other things as well. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written. If "the whole world" would not have space for all the things He did do, it is unlikely to have space for all the things he didn't.


7

If this were an important doctrine, it seems there would be fairly clear reference to it in the Scriptures. However, the Bible is incredibly silent on it and even seems to indicate that Joseph had no union with here until Jesus was born. Irrelevant. There are many things all Christians believe that are not directly spelled out in the bible, such as the ...


7

I've found some very interesting quotes of Martin Luther: Christ, our Savior, was the real and natural fruit of Mary's virginal womb . . . This was without the cooperation of a man, and she remained a virgin after that. Luther's Works, eds. Jaroslav Pelikan (vols. 1-30) & Helmut T. Lehmann (vols. 31-55), St. Louis: Concordia Pub. House (vols. 1-30); ...


6

Calvin's commentary on Matthew 1:25 deserves to be quoted in full (hat-tip to gmoothart): 25. And knew her not This passage afforded the pretext for great disturbances, which were introduced into the Church, at a former period, by Helvidius. The inference he drew from it was, that Mary remained a virgin no longer than till her first birth, and that ...


5

For many the miracle of the Virgin Birth is one thing, but lifelong abstinence from sexuality is impossible to accept. The lives of monastics and ascetics around the world and throughout history attest to the fact that it is possible. Sexual purity is only one of many challenges set for these spiritual warriors, and for many, perhaps most of them, it is not ...


5

Maybe this isn't an answer, but I'd say: Why do you ask Protestants for the origin of a Catholic doctrine? Wouldn't it make more sense to ask Catholics where they got this idea? Personally I don't know if historical documents survive that would give an objective answer to the question. If anyone out there knows, I think that would be interesting. Any ...


5

I think you hit the nail on the head with your mention of the brother's and sisters of Christ mentioned in Mark. All scripture says that Christ would be born of a virgin, it says nothing about her having to stay a virgin forever. On top of that there is this scripture in Matt: Matt 1: 24-25 24 Then Joseph being raised from sleep did as the angle of ...


4

If you are interested in what some of the early Church Fathers wrote on this you can look at http://www.catholic.com/tracts/mary-ever-virgin. But, the significance is that Mary had trusted in God when she was young, and told that a miracle had happened. So, she serves as an example of devotion, obedience and purity to Catholics. So, her special place in ...


3

Even before Augustine, St. Ambrose of Milan and St. Jerome used this verse in support of the dogma of the Perpetual virginity of Mary. Probably St. Augustine learned from his teacher St. Ambrose of Milan. Some quite emphatically understand this closed gate through which only the Lord God of Israel passes … as the Virgin Mary, who remains a Virgin before ...


3

14 They all joined together constantly in prayer, along with the women and Mary the mother of Jesus, and with his brothers. (Acts 1:14) Mary's closeness to Jesus' disciples in the scripture gives evidence that she was one of Jesus' followers - especially this verse in Acts.


2

I am not a Catholic so I guess I cannot give you the best answer, but here's my answer from an Eastern Orthodox viewpoint, which might be quite different from the Catholic one (or not?): The ultimate purpose of marriage is actually the salvation of the bride and groom together. Bearing children is not a purpose in itself, but a consequence. Having children ...


2

Mary, by her own free will, took a vow of virginity, and she understood that this meant that she was never supposed to have marital relations. Joseph knew when he was informed of Mary's vow. Both came to understand that marriage was their vocation, and became betrothed. This knowledge has come down through tradition and Scripture. The following point is ...


1

I'm not aware of any specific Catholic documentation that concerns itself with when and how Mary and Joseph decided no avoid a sexual lifestyle. So, the answer will is necessarily an extrapolation of some general Catholic understandings. So, the answer, I think, lies within a few well-established Catholic beliefs: Sex, in the context of marriage, is a ...



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