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29

Yes, it is absolutely possible for editions of the Bible to contain errors. There is no magical mechanism to prevent this. There are some notorious printing mistakes, for example: A 1631 printing of the King James version is now called the "Wicked Bible", owing to its rendering of Exodus 20:14, Thou shalt commit adultery In 1763, the "Fool's Bible" ...


11

I think that there are two main reasons why the Messiah had to be God. One, which you alluded to in your question, is that he had to be sinless in order to be the perfect sacrifice for sins. I don't hold that Mary was sinless (Romans 3:10), and I believe that only God could have been sinless. So in my opinion, that is a valid line of reasoning for the ...


9

Jesus continuously said things that got to the heart of the matter. This example is no different. In your quote from Matthew we see a young man that wants to know what good thing he must do to get eternal life. Eventually, Jesus says what you have quoted. What the man then does and what Jesus says immediately after revels what Jesus meant. 22 When the ...


7

Being created doesn't affect perfection as much as impassability. The doctrine of impassability states that God cannot change- that he is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow. If God (or Jesus) were created then he has changed - he went from not existing to existing. The tie in between perfection and impassability is this: if God changes, then it sets ...


6

Only God is perfect, and (except for Mormon teaching) we will never be God. Ergo, we will never be perfect. Going a bit deeper into the word, however, when the Bible uses the word perfect, it is typically the Greek word telos. Telos does not imply a state of being, but rather a direction toward the end for which a thing is made. It has the sense of a ...


6

An interesting opinion I heard on this (and incidentally the reason I asked the question, though I hoped for and got better answers) had to do with the infinitude of God. Since God is infinite, sinning against him is an "infinite" sin (for those who believe in "trivial" sins, assume i'm talking about a lifetime of sin from someone). For God to be just, ...


6

Genesis 1 never calls humans or human bodies "perfect", it does near the end of the chapter call all of creation "very good." We also have no indication from scripture about increasing amounts of genetic imperfections as humanity survived though the ages, so that might infer that we are trying to read into the scripture something it never set out for or was ...


5

The word perfect rarely means sinless in the Bible, it generally means well rounded, or mature. The idea of a sinless Christian is foreign to the Bible, except of course those in heaven. For example Paul uses the words translated into English as perfect here: 12 Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my ...


5

You can have a house that's halfway through being built. And the work that's done so far can be flawless, with no problems anywhere, but it's still not a perfect house. Or, likewise, have a look at Adam and Eve. They were created without sin, but when temptation came along, they chose to transgress God's commandments. Jesus, on the other hand, was also ...


5

Summary The Bible has a long history of textual issues, but none of them have any bearing on the core of our faith. Textual and translation errors If you are interested in a fairly detailed and scholarly (yet highly readable) account of the transmission issues of New Testament texts, I highly recommend Bart Ehrman's Misquoting Jesus. Remarkably the book ...


5

Few Christians would challenge the idea that there can be errors in translation or copying. You can always correct a translation error by going back to the original language. Copying errors are a bit more of a problem, as how can you know for certain what the original text was? In practice, though, it is usually possible to identify copying errors by ...


4

I was planning on an answer almost as Eric's which will now carry no weight so I'd focus on possible consequences if man had played Jesus' role. First of all I do not think we could compare man's 'perfection' (Mary or anybody else) to that of God. "There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one ...


4

This understanding, I believe, grows out of an overly literal reading of the word "die" in Genesis 2 (see related question here: What is the specific meaning of "die" in Genesis 2?). Couple this with an overly-literal reading of Romans 5:12, which says that death entered the world (not just humanity) at the same time, we come to the belief that ...


3

There are two fulfilments of this passage: Firstly, an imminent and very literal fulfilment: the sign is that a young woman (one meaning of the Hebrew word 'almah') will conceive and have a child, and by the time they are 12 - 13 (that's when Judaism of that time would consider them to 'know right from wrong'), the lands of the two kings Ahaz fears, Israel ...


3

In the passage you mention it never says Jesus sinned or did evil. We can find the answer to that question in Hebrews 4:14-15 Seeing then that we have a great High Priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in ...


3

He emptied Himself of all the glory of Heaven to become a man on Earth. Yes, I think that means He gave everything (more than we can imagine), not just for the poor, but for the whole of mankind. Philippians 2:4-8 (KJV) 4  Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others. 5  Let this mind be in you, which was ...


3

He most likely was referring to the movement of Slavophilism. Tolstoy was excommunicated from the Orthodox church because of his rejection of the Hegelian and Slavophilia influences that were prevalent1 throughout the 19th century. This would explain why he saw this as a "frivolous and fallacious" view on faith. The basic premise behind this view is as ...


3

The premise of the question is incorrect. The Messiah does not have to be God. Have a look at this Wikipedia article for a long list of messianic claimants: Jewish Messiah claimants All of these figures were thought by some to be the messiah at one time. But none of them were spoken of in the kinds of terms used about Jesus of Nazareth. That doesn't in ...


3

According to Isaiah, the Messiah was a man- namely Cyrus. (Isaiah 45:1) Thus, if we are to read the text literally, the Messiah was in fact man. The salvific purpose of the Messiah was also temporal. As the Jews understood it, he would bring freedom to the captives, raise the poor from their situation, and generally turn the order upside down. What only ...


3

Scripture doesn't address accidents and the like. In the context of Christianity, this means the only valid answer is "We don't know". The King James and other versions do use the word "perfect" in several places in the Bible when describing saved state: 2 Timothy 3:17 That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works. ...


2

We will receive a glorified body like that which was shown to the Apostles on Mt Tabor at the Transfiguration. The Transfiguration gives us a foretaste of Christ's glorious coming, when he "will change our lowly body to be like his glorious body." But it also recalls that "it is through many persecutions that we must enter the kingdom of God": CCC ...


2

What was perfection like? Perfection was being able to walk with God in Eden. Following the fall; Genesis 3:8 And they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the garden. Perfection was childbirth without pain. Following the ...


2

In 1 Corinthians 15, Paul distinguishes between heavenly bodies and earthly bodies. He says that the first Adam "was of the dust of the earth", so he and we have ordinary bodies; whereas the body of our resurrection, brought about by Christ as the new Adam, will be immortal and incorruptible. This suggests that even before Adam's sin, he was mortal and his ...


2

The issue here is not a matter of preference, but one of reality. If it were actually true that we were all born perfect, then we should certainly believe that. However, that is certainly not reality. Only a very few people ever believe they are perfect and were born that way, and that is not a sentiment shared by those around them. So, the question ...


2

As Jeremiah says, the heart is deceitful and wicked above all things, who can know it? Part of the point of the doctrine of original sin is that man is born so twisted that he is not fully capable of choosing right and wrong, even if our conscious and revealed law were somehow able to guide us correctly. Because we are unable to make a valid choice, God ...


2

This is the NIV translation: He will be eating curds and honey when he knows enough to reject the wrong and choose the right Children are not aware of good or evil until they reach a certain age, "age of accountability", and understanding. One cannot choose to do good or evil until one is aware of what good and evil are and the differences between ...


1

I don't see that the passage you quoted suggests 'the boy' Jesus sinned. It talks about Him being in a state which is before He knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good, but noone in such a state could be said to have sinned, since sin is a choice. If someone doesn't know how to refuse the evil and choose the good, it means they are too young to be ...


1

Being created is not what makes something imperfect. Creation was created perfect by a perfect God: And God saw everything that He had made, and behold, it was very good (suitable, pleasant) and He approved it completely. And there was evening and there was morning, a sixth day. Genesis 1:31 If God approves it completely, it must be perfect. But then ...


1

One classical definition widely accepted among Christians : God is a pure spirit, infinitely perfect, creator and ruler of all things and beeings. 1)There are a lot of explanations, please focus on one or some theologies. One would have to start from the original sin. One explanation is that the world had to be somehow prepared. And God doesn't send ...



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