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I'm an orthodox christian (formerly catholic), but I think I may have a lead for you to follow in order to get an answer for your question: Both Catholic and Orthodox Churches consider as an authority, besides the Holy Scripture, the Holy Tradition. It is this Holy Tradition that the protestants are, well, protesting with the sola scriptura doctrine. I ...


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This is a pretty straight forward question that deserves a straight forward answer. In the books of the canonized New Testament, I can find no place where Paul ever directly quotes any sayings of Jesus that are recorded from any other source than himself. On several occasions, Paul attributes to Jesus what he claims to have heard in his visions (see the ...


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Paul sometimes chose to push the envelope a little, as he does here, and in some cases the outcome is an unsupported argument created in the cause of spreading the gospel. In 'Paul's "Use" of Scripture: Why the Audience Matters', published in As It is Written (edited by Stanley and Porter), pages 135-6, Christopher D. Stanley is speaking of Galatians 3:16 ...


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There is no getting around it. Paul was swearing an oath: just as we might do in a court of law, although the wording is less formal than that used in a court. How to judge Paul for that is another matter. The injunction in James 5:12 is the easier one to dismiss, because this is a command attributed to James, not to Jesus. However, the injunction in Matthew ...


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We see in 1 Corinthians 5:5 that Paul calls for the sinner to be handed to Satan for the destruction of his flesh so that his spirit can be saved. If Paul was proposing the literal implementation of Leviticus 20:11 then hw would certainly have been proposing a killing: And the man that lieth with his father's wife hath uncovered his father's nakedness: ...


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>>I don't hold the position that he is a false Apostle Paul most certainly was not a false apostle. His epistles show he suffered greatly in order to help spread Christianity among the gentiles and, according to tradition, died for it. Maybe he thought that if he got to be an insider with influence, he could corrupt the teachings from the inside? ...


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Paul, himself, never uses the name Saul, which occurs in reference to him only in Acts of the Apostles. Acts first refers to 'Saul' as Paul in verse 13:9, which follows immediately after mention of Sergius Paulus, described as the deputy (proconsul) of the country. It is possible that Saul was already known as Paul, and the author of Acts chose this ...


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Alan Millard says in Discoveries from the Time of Jesus, page 72, that the silver denarius, equal to the Greek drachma, was a good day's wage, which means only the wealthy could afford a trip costing hundreds, or even thousands of denarii. If Acts 18:3 is correct in describing Paul as a tentmaker, he would have been among the very poor of society. This is ...


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None of the major Reformation leaders is likely to have doubted that Paul actually met Jesus on the road to Damascus - this was a step too far for an era when the Bible was almost universally regarded as inerrant. It remains a step too far for a pope, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. However, recent Christian leaders have begun to ...


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Paul mentions having been imprisoned a number of times, but this answer is only concerned with the occasions on which he was given the liberty to write letters. The Epistles to Philippians, Ephesians, Colossians and Philemon are often called the 'Prison Epistles' because they appear to have been written by Paul while in prison. Of these, only Philippians and ...


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Authenticity The New Oxford Annotated Bible prologue is correct in stating the Pastoral Epistles (1 Timothy, 2 Timothy and Titus are psuedoepigraphical, not written by Paul. Bart D. Ehrman, in Forged, page 98, cites the British scholar A. N. Harrison who wrote an important study of the pastoral letters in 1921, giving numerous statistics about word usage. ...


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Looking at the context, we see Paul, who often portrays himself as a proud Jew, talking about Jews in surprisingly harsh terms: 1 Thessalonians 2:15-16: Who both killed the Lord Jesus, and their own prophets, and have persecuted us; and they please not God, and are contrary to all men: Forbidding us to speak to the Gentiles that they might be saved, to ...


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Romans 8:29 To Paul, resurrection makes us all sons of God, but Jesus was the first. We see this in Romans 1:4, where Paul tells us Jesus was the Son of God by the fact of his resurrection: 4 And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead: Paul promised his followers that they ...


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A small earthquake like this one was unlikely to have been recorded in the first century. However, if you are looking for evidence for or against this earthquake and the events described in Acts 16:26, then there is literary evidence that suggests the earthquake did not happen, as these events appear to have been a literary creation by the author of Acts. ...


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But when it pleased God, who separated me from my mother's womb, and called me by his grace, To reveal his Son in me, that I might preach him among the heathen; immediately I conferred not with flesh and blood: Neither went I up to Jerusalem to them which were apostles before me; but I went into Arabia, and returned again unto Damascus. (Galatians 1:15, ...


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The meaning of 2 Timothy 3:16 hinges on the meaning of two words in that verse: 1. θεόπνευστος (theopneustos), "God-breathed, inspired by God" This word occurs only once in the New Testament, in 2 Timothy 3:16. However, it is a compound of two common Greek words meaning "God" and "breath," so translating it is easy enough. Exactly what the writer of 2 ...


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2 Timothy 3:16 says that all scripture is God-breathed. The words clearly have the meaning that all scripture is inspired by God. If Paul wrote these words, he can only have been writing of the Old Testament, since there was no notion of the books of New Testament as 'scripture' during the first century, and in any case, Paul lived before the first gospel ...


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Both "majority opinion" and "evangelical" (even with the guidelines you supplied) are slippery terms. They'll probably always be in a state of flux, so it's difficult to supply exactly what you've asked for. But don't panic. I think a relatively clear picture can still emerge. I've decided to give a sampling of three scholars who I think are firmly within ...



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