New answers tagged

8

A case could be made for Clement of Rome, considered by Irenaeus (Against Heresies III.3.3) and Eusebius (Church History V.6) to be the fourth Bishop of Rome (after Peter, Linus, and [Ana]cletus). (Apparently, there is some discussion as to whether Linus and Anacletus were essentially “auxiliary bishops” and Clement was Peter’s actual successor.) In any ...


3

We don't know. One writing included among those attributed to the Apostolic Fathers is the Epistle of Barnabas. If the Epistle of Barnabas was written by Barnabas, then yes - Barnabas knew Paul. An ancient tradition holds that St. Peter, while en route to Antioch to meet St. Paul, appointed Ignatius to be bishop. Since Paul spent time in Antioch and ...


1

Based on the account in Acts of the Apostles, we could never consider Paul to be a gnostic. The mere fact that he was taught the gospel in Damascus by disciples of the centrist church means that he must have taught the same message as did James, Peter and John in Jerusalem. Although originally anonymous, Acts has been attributed to Luke, the companion of ...


6

It seems as though many that assert the possibility are either looking at why the Gnostics believed that Paul was a member of such, as Pagels, they are not Christian, as Massey, or are either mysticism or on the periphery of accepted or mainstream Christianity. Pseudo-Apocrypha like The Apocalypse of Paul and other Gnostic documents from Nag Hammadi seem ...


3

Jesus delivered his Great Commission to the Apostles and other disciples in Matthew 28: Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey ...


2

Paul clearly knew about the life of Jesus, as he affirms this in his own words in many places: Paul knew the words spoken by our Lord Jesus Acts 20:35: I have shewed you all things, how that so labouring ye ought to support the weak, and to remember the words of Jesus, how He said, It is more blessed to give than to receive Paul knew about the ...


1

Paul's Epistles are always written to churches who have already heard the gospel and the story of Jesus. They are written to encourage and correct those congregations. There is no need for him to repeat every detail of his initial Gospel teaching in every epistle. That would be redundant. As far as the claim that Paul knew no details of Christ's life: ...


10

I am aware of four lines of evidence frequently adduced: Greek syntax and vocabulary Even a casual read through Ephesians in Greek shows it to be different from the undisputed Pauline letters.1 Despite their sometimes complex argument structure, the Greek of the other letters tends to minimize the complicated subordinating syntax of Classical Greek. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included