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25

You are correct in stating that there are no recorded teachings of Jesus on homosexuality. However, to suggest that this means there is disagreement between Paul and Jesus is unreasonable, since it is comparing something to nothing. It is certainly wrong to assume that Jesus disagreed with Paul on that just because He never explicitly indicates His ...


22

I have heard two explanations for this. I tend to think the second one is much more sound in the context given but I will offer them both for reference. First of all, the passage in question is 1 Corinthians 14:34. The first explanation I've heard is that at the time, most women were poorly educated and had a difficult time participating in the discussions ...


20

In Acts 9 there were witnesses when Jesus Christ spoke to Saul. 3 As he neared Damascus on his journey, suddenly a light from heaven flashed around him. 4 He fell to the ground and heard a voice say to him, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” 5 “Who are you, Lord?” Saul asked. “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting,” he replied. 6 “Now get ...


17

1 Corinthians 7:12 has an interesting phrase (emphasis mine) Now to the married I command, yet not I but the Lord: A wife is not to depart from her husband. But even if she does depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband. And a husband is not to divorce his wife. But to the rest I, not the Lord, say: If any brother has a wife who ...


17

The Apostle Peter certainly treated Paul's letters as God's word, elevating them to the status of written scripture: He [Paul] writes the same way in all his letters, speaking in them of these matters. His letters contain some things that are hard to understand, which ignorant and unstable people distort, as they do the other Scriptures, to their own ...


16

Most hold that Hebrews was not authored by Paul because the style and form of the Greek is so good and fine, compared with the style of Paul's other, non-anonymous, writings. The style of Hebrews is almost as if it were a prepared sermon. However, it would be hard to disagree that the contents (the theology and doctrine) agree perfectly with that of Paul's ...


16

The evidence for Paul being married is fairly scant. He writes in 1 Corinthians 9:5: "Don't we have the right to take a believing wife along with us, as do the other apostles and the Lord's brothers and Cephas?" The implication could be made that Paul was complaining about leaving some wife behind. In Galatians 1:14, Paul says: "I was advancing ...


15

No. Paul was advocating kicking him out of the Church, not killing him. The fact that it means to kick the person out of the Church is clarified in verse 12: (Emphasis added.) 12 What business is it of mine to judge those outside the church? Are you not to judge those inside? 13 God will judge those outside. “Expel the wicked person from among ...


15

Peter means "stone" in Greek, while Cephas is "stone" in Aramaic. That verse is confusing in the NIV; the KJV is clearer: John 1:42 (KJV) 42And he brought him to Jesus. And when Jesus beheld him, he said, Thou art Simon the son of Jona: thou shalt be called Cephas, which is by interpretation, A stone. Christ was speaking in Aramaic, and would have ...


14

The criticisms that Paul 'invented' Christianity, or 'distorted' the message of Jesus, often boil down to two primary claims: Paul sought to abolish Torah observance Paul deified Jesus, equating him with the God of Israel 1. Paul, and the role of Torah A recent publication, The Jewish Annotated New Testament, contains commentary and perspectives by ...


13

Order, Authority and Peace Would you ever dare to mention that the Holy Spirit is subject to the authority and/or control of a Man? If you cannot fathom that the Holy Spirit would ever be subjected to man then you do not understand order and peace. 1 Corinthians 14:32-33 NIV 32 The spirits of prophets are subject to the control of prophets. 33 ...


13

Paul certainly wrote other letters, but they were either lost or were not theological. For example, 1 Corinthians 16:3: Then, when I arrive, I will give letters of introduction to the men you approve and send them with your gift to Jerusalem. Regarding one more letter to Corinth, that is the implication in 1 Corinthians 5:9 when he refers to an earlier ...


13

Johann Albrecht Bengel (1687-1752), a Lutheran clergyman and scholar, attributed Hebrews to Paul. He is one of few writers to do so on the basis of something other than tradition or similarity of ideas. In his Gnomon Novi Testamenti, his annotation to 2 Peter 3:15 (KJV) And account that the longsuffering of our Lord is salvation; even as our beloved ...


13

The NPP includes more than just a new set of interpretations for Paul's works, it also re-examines several other historical issues and purports to throw a different light on them. In reading through material from both sides, I find that much breath seems to be wasted on detailed analysis of issues that aren't actually new or different in any way, but that a ...


13

We know that He spoke Greek, Hebrew. May be Latin, but there is not reference about that. The Latin guess is made on the fact that he was Roman and the official langue of Rome was Latin. Proof text for Hebrew: 14 And when we had all fallen to the ground, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me? It is ...


12

The Apostle Peter believed him to be "authentic": Therefore, beloved, since you look for these things, be diligent to be found by Him in peace, spotless and blameless, and regard the patience of our Lord as salvation; just as also our beloved brother Paul, according to the wisdom given him, wrote to you, as also in all his letters, speaking in them of ...


12

There are a number of passages that suggest that Paul preached the same message as the first eleven apostles. Paul says so: I went up because of a revelation and set before [the Jerusalem church] (though privately before those who seemed influential) the gospel that I proclaim among the Gentiles, in order to make sure I was not running or had not run ...


12

In asking this question, you have added a layer of interpretation onto the text that I do not see there. You introduce the word "want" which does not exist in the text. In fact I don't see any indication in the text that Paul has a desire for personal vengeance or that he wants Alaxander to get what's coming to him. In fact is is quite likely based on what ...


12

The answer is perhaps best given in 1 Corinthians 9:20-23 (emphasis added): To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. To those outside the law I became as one outside the law (not being outside the law of God but ...


10

Jesus said to keep the commandments, including the commandment against Adultery (Matthew 19:16–19) The commandments against adultery form the basis for the Catholic teaching against homosexual acts and all sexual acts outside of marriage. These teachings all fall under an explanation of the sixth commadnment: Chastity and homosexuality ...


10

There are many theories, including: a demon, since Paul says it was a "messenger of Satan" a physical affliction: "incessant temptation, dogged opponents, chronic maladies (such as eye problems, malaria, migraine headaches, and epilepsy), to a speech disability" false teachers (My personal theory is that it was his eyesight; but the majority of experts ...


10

1 Corinthians 11: 23-26 For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you, that the Lord Jesus, on the night he was handed over, took bread, and, after he had given thanks, broke it and said, “This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my ...


9

I'm not a theologian but my understanding is that what's "new" is the move away from the traditional reformed view of justification by works vs. by faith. Wright does not deny this but believes that the traditional view misunderstands and oversimplifies what Paul meant, taking "works" to mean any human effort or action. Wright, I think, sees these "works" in ...


9

There is one problem with the argument - "Matthias was never sent by Christ to do anything, therefore he cannot be an apostle". The problem is that Barnabus (of whom we have no evidence that he was sent by Christ) is also called an "apostle" in Acts 14:14. We know that Judas was an apostle and his "office" (Acts 1:20) was taken over by Matthias. And it is ...


8

(I wrote this in an essay on Hebrews a few years back) Origen (185-254 CE) in the East has been quoted as saying that God only knows who wrote the Epistle although he also suggested that Paul was the author (Robertson, 1932). Hippolytus (170-236 CE) from Rome denied it was written by Paul. Tertullian (160-220 CE) in North Africa spoke of an Epistle of ...


8

First you would have to look at the beginning and the end. First, there is no salutation. This is unlike Paul, who has wrote all of his letters with some kind of salutation. What does this tell us? It tells us that there is a possibility of this not being a letter. Sure, it is epistle, but if it is, why is there no salutation? However, the letter does ...


8

If Jesus did not in fact say that, it doesn't mean that Paul and Christ are in contradiction with one another. Not saying something does not mean acceptance or approval. That said, Jesus has made a stand and voiced opposition against homosexuality. Just not while He was performing his ministry here on earth. First, Jesus is God: John 8:58 - Jesus said to ...


8

If the "new" perspective belief is accurate, then the actual answer is "nothing". The New Perspective on Paul attempts to get back to the original intent of Paul's letters by explaining the issues he was addressing when he wrote them. The movement asserts that our current teachings and understanding of his letters are based on a misunderstanding of the ...


8

There are plenty examples: Paul: For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. (Rom 13,9) Jesus: Thou shalt love the Lord ...


7

In Paul's day, Greek was still widely used in Rome, so knowledge of Latin was not crucial. Besides Hebrew and Greek, he most likely spoke Aramaic.



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