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11

As this question explains, the Pope is not considered infallible every time he speaks, but only when he speaks ex cathedra. Essentially this means only when he makes a deliberately definitive pronouncement on a matter of doctrine. The quote you give is therefore not relevant. Even if Peter were considered a Pope at this point, the incident described would ...


11

Ex cathedra means from the chair literally. It refers to the power of the reigning Pope to speak infallibly on doctrinal or moral issues. And although, in my understanding, the power of speaking "from the chair" in general is not a concept necessarily new to Catholicism (think of any leader speaking officially from their official seat), in Catholicism it ...


8

This is not completely hypothetical. In the mid-300s, Pope Liberius may have signed a statement supporting what later became known as Arian heresy. That he did so in exile and possibly under torture is mitigation, and the story is complex, but it is a more concrete version of this question. In any event, there was clear pressure from the Emperor that came ...


8

One could perhaps say that the dogmatic definition of papal infallibility as expressed at Vatican I is the Church's formal way of dealing with this tension. The case of Pope Honorius has of course been debated for centuries and was brought up prior to Vatican I as an argument against papal infallibility. The old Catholic Encyclopedia has a helpful summary of ...


7

Yeah, you want: from TAN Books. It's got a pretty well sourced index. Mark Trapp speaks truth about the Marian Dogmas, there are four of 'em but only the last two are the products of papal statements, the other two were pronounced as result of ecumenical councils. But, Bl. John Paul II spoke on an infallible teaching about women in the priesthood, ...


4

As you have known already not all pronouncements from a pope is spoken ex-cathedra. And the answer that you have quoted notes the three points to be fulfilled in order to make a pronouncement ex-cathedra: to be held by the whole church, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine concerning faith or morals If we test ...


3

In the last chapter, ch. V "The Relation of the Holy Ghost to the Divine Tradition of the Faith" (pp. 210-48), of Card. Manning's The Temporal Mission of the Holy Ghost, he shows how the Holy Ghost has preserved the Church pure, comparing it to the dissolution of other sects like Protestantism. Anytime the Church convenes a dogmatic, General Council (like ...


3

First, some much-needed background. The pope is infallible only when he speaks ex cathedra. Ex cathedra is not a linguistic formula, it is simply a way to recognize those times when the pope gives a teaching that is correct and will remain correct forever. Ecumenical councils are another organ of infallibility, but we can talk about just the pope without ...


2

When the Pope speaks with infallibility on dogma, it is known as being in Ex Cathedra. The conclusion from the Catholic Encyclopedia is that "The broad fact, therefore, remains certain that no ex cathedra definition of any pope has ever been shown to be erroneous." The Catholic Encyclopedia, linked above, has a very lengthy article about Papal ...


2

Here are some biblical sections (NIV): Matthew 28:18-20 Matthew 16:18 John 14-16 I Timothy 3:14-15 Acts 15:28 I will need to go into more detail later but basically, the Holy Spirit is expected by Jesus to help protect the church remain faithful standing against the forces of Hell. Now, this doesn't mean the Pope will be correct if he is doing math ...


2

No, it would not be justified. If papal infallibility was not true and well-established, then defining infallibility ad-hoc in 1870 would have been mortally dangerous for the Church. At that point, there had been 255 popes over the course of about 1800 years. Note that ex-cathedra is not a label; it is basically a clear statement on a particular topic, ...


2

Like Affable Geek states...this is more historically concrete than one might think. I think the basic 2 questions you are getting at (someone correct me if I'm wrong) are: Question 1 - What would (should) happen if a Roman Pope promulgates, decrees, or endorses a heretical doctrine? Answer - He would be anathametized as an heretic in an Ecumenical ...


1

I think the best example is Humanae Vitae. The commission appointed to study the issue (contraception) recommended some form for married couples. And of course secular society (and most Catholics) in the 60's wanted to see contraception approved. Nevertheless, through the influence of the Holy Spirit, Paul VI reaffirmed the traditional Catholic view of ...


1

I believe this ending conclusion and summary - Thus, even if public authority commanded that every religious institution perform same-sex marriages, if the Church believed that such a command contravened the will of God, it would refuse to do so. - in MattGutting's answer to Homosexual marriages in the Catholic church sums it up well. The Lord Jesus himself ...


1

Heretics lose their office in the Church. Pope Paul IV, Bull Cum ex Apostolatus Officio, Feb. 15, 1559: “1… Remembering also that, where danger is greater, it must more fully and more diligently be counteracted, We have been concerned lest false prophets or others, even if they have only secular jurisdiction, should wretchedly ensnare the ...


1

Pope Honorius was condemned as a heretic by Pope Saint Leo II, an ecumenical council and subsequent popes affirmed the anathemas. The historical record therefore shows that a pope can fall into heresy. Pope Paul IV taught that if a pope falls into heresy he loses the papal office. He said in order to be pope a man must be Catholic. If he ceases to be ...


1

Being a hypothetical question, you're bound to get a lot of personal opinion. I'll give it my best shot though. In a nutshell, Catholics (as far as personal experience and research) are told they must obey the Pope because of his responsibility to serve and protect the Church and it's people. So if a Pope were to snap and go full-on heretic, some would say ...


1

Dogma's are declared in the Catholic Church when they become necessary. They are de fide or "of the Faith" going back to the Apostles, but not declared until there is a need to say them in a legal way. That could be because there are many asking questions about the subject and it needs clarification. i.e. papal infallibility was always a part of "the ...



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