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22

Nobody in ancient times could have imagined that the earth was billions of years old, so you won't see any explicit attempts to reconcile the Genesis creation stories with an old earth. However, the early Christians did see discrepancies that made them question how literally the creation stories should be understood. Second century Christian apologist ...


18

Put simply, it doesn't. Satan will not be the punisher in hell, but among the punished. Satan is not any any sense the king of hell And when the thousand years are ended, Satan will be released from his prison and will come out to deceive the nations that are at the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, to gather them for battle; their number ...


15

There is much negative information on the internet on this subject making it very difficult to earnestly study it and where the belief that the Archangel Michael is Jesus Christ originated. The Jehovah's Witnesses surely inherrited it from Charles Taze Russell, the founder of the movement that led to the formulation of the Jehovah's Witnesses. He equates ...


13

Protestantism and Tradition I'm coming at this answer from a Protestant perspective. Since I've seen a variety of folk in my branch of Christianity hold hands during prayer, I'll assume you've been observing my people. We've inherited from Paul a suspicion of traditional rites and practices. When we do observe some custom, we are very likely to either: ...


13

Asking this question against all of "Christianity" turns this into an overview question of a very broad scope. In order to answer such a broad question, one must paint with broad strokes. There are two basic approaches taken. Deny the validity or applicability of any scientific claims that directly conflict with the origin of man being God's direct ...


12

1. Christianity as a religion The central point of the whole Christian faith is the resurrection of Jesus Christ: 1 Corinthians 15:19-20 (ESV) 19If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied. 20But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. This happened ...


12

Augustine of Hippo is basically universally credited with the coinage of the phrase. It is an idea which can easily be supported by the Bible, but he was the first to say it in a form close to its present proverbial form. He probably didn't think he was coining a cliche, since it was neatly hidden away in a letter to a convent. This blog has a summary of the ...


11

#1 & #2: Who is he? Where did he come from? Satan was/is the highest created angel, with God from the beginning, along with the other angels (Ez. 28:13). Sometime before the creation of mankind, Satan convinced 1/3 of the angels to rebel against God, ultimately with God and the remaining angels winning (Rev. 12:3-9). After this occurs, we know that Satan ...


11

I don't know how much weight should be put on this reference, but it does give different information: It may come as a surprise but the doctrine of the Rapture is not mentioned in any Christian writings, of which we have knowledge, until after the year 1830 C.E. Whether the early writers were Greek or Latin, Armenian or Coptic, Syrian or Ethiopian, ...


10

The story is found in the Apocryphal Arabic Gospel of the Infancy of the Saviour: (23) And turning away from this place, they came to a desert; and hearing that it was infested by robbers, Joseph and the Lady Mary resolved to cross this region by night. But as they go along, behold, they see two robbers lying in the way, and along with them a great ...


9

As dleyva3 mentioned, the term comes from 1 Thessalonians 4:17. Our word "rapture" comes from the Latin word for "caught up". The doctrine that faithful Christians would be whisked away to be spared tribulation is a relatively new interpretation of that verse. The traditional Christian belief was that Jesus would return once, to bring judgment. At his ...


8

That, in fact is the Papal Cross or Ferula. It has been used since Pope Paul VI, designed by the Italian artist Lello Scorzelli. It is used in the same manner as a crozier. However, the cross bar is bent much like the paterissa.


7

Doctrine does not make claims about the definitions that biologists (or others) use. If someone wanted to assert that the earth is billions of years old, then someone's doctrine may contradict that assertion, but it is not a doctrinal assertion to argue about what is meant by macro- or microevolution. If someone has an issue with macroevolution (e.g. ...


7

Those are crosiers, which have their origin in a shepherd's crook and are a symbol of a bishop being a "shepherd of men." Many have become more ornate than just a simple shepherd's crook and have crosses or other stuff on them; check out the pictures on the wikipedia article on crosier. Here, you can buy one yourself and smite some heathen. The one in the ...


7

Micro and macroevolution are non-ideal terms because they indicate that the issue is the size of changes, whereas the real issue is the type of changes. Adaptation (and natural selection) are undeniable, but they consist of changes that shuffle and modify genetic information that is already in existence. By contrast 'macroevolution' involves adding new ...


7

There is a famous painting called "The Light of the World," painted by William Hunt in 1853. By his own statement, it comes from Revelation 3.20, and represents Jesus knocking at the heart of an obstaninate sinner, on a door with no handles, and which must be opened from the inside. The image itself has been copied many times, and this is the version I ...


7

The phrase “dark night of the soul” comes from a poem by St. John of the Cross (1542-1591), a Spanish Carmelite monk and mystic, whose Noche obscura del alma is translated “The Dark Night of the Soul.” Its meant to be synonymous with traveling the “narrow way” that Jesus spoke of in Matthew 7:13-14. So no, it is not mentioned in the Bible. Sources: ...


6

Genesis 1 never calls humans or human bodies "perfect", it does near the end of the chapter call all of creation "very good." We also have no indication from scripture about increasing amounts of genetic imperfections as humanity survived though the ages, so that might infer that we are trying to read into the scripture something it never set out for or was ...


5

The story has two major points--the boy who performed the search, and the revelation much later of the boy's identity as the penitent thief. Considering that the Bible says nothing about such a boy even existing, and that it does not give the penitent thief any identity beyond "some criminal who happened to be getting crucified at the same time as Jesus," ...


5

Genesis tells us of Abraham's dealings with Melchizedek: Genesis 14: 18-20 18 And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the most high God. 19 And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be Abram of the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth: 20 And blessed be the most high God, which hath ...


5

For most issues in Christianity, doctrine is only clearly defined once a heresy (or disagreement) comes up which requires it. For instance, the canonization of the New Testament only happened because people started circulating their own canons which were clearly bad. Historical theologians probably did not think about the age of the Earth in specific ...


5

In American Christianity, specifically black or African American churches, "praise dancing" is a cultural norm practiced all over the United States, generally in more progressive churches. It is also referred to as Liturgical Dance(a). Generally, the practice involved playing gospel ballads or other popular black gospel music from contemporary black gospel ...


5

It did indeed, though not that exact phrase. It was St. Augustine in his Letter 211 (A.D. 423), in point number 11: ... If she refuse to submit to this, and does not go away from you of her own accord, let her be expelled from your society. For this is not done cruelly but mercifully, to protect very many from perishing through infection of the plague ...


4

In reference to your comment on Narnian's answer, my guess is that since Satan is referred to as the "prince of this world" (John 12:31, 14:30), it's been misconstrued over the years to mean "ruler" &/or "king". Along the same lines, since we understand he'll be in Hell for eternity, people have associated the "prince of this world" and "will be in hell" ...


4

This understanding, I believe, grows out of an overly literal reading of the word "die" in Genesis 2 (see related question here: What is the specific meaning of "die" in Genesis 2?). Couple this with an overly-literal reading of Romans 5:12, which says that death entered the world (not just humanity) at the same time, we come to the belief that ...


4

When sin is defined as moving against God's will and evil is defined as the absence of God's presence it seems that sin and evil were first made when Lucifer rebelled against God and was cast from his position of glory and out of God's presence. The story is somewhat detailed in Isiah. “How you are fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! ...


4

There is a relatively large and active community engaged in reconciling the current claims of mainstream biological science with what is known as "Young Earth Creationism." Young Earth Creationists believe that God's creation of the earth took seven literal twenty-four-hour days, and that it took place roughly 6,000 years ago. It is common among that ...


4

While I have never heard this, I did a quick scrub of the net and found a very good article about it: http://www.gotquestions.org/ask-Jesus-into-heart.html It seems it is most often (incorrectly) associated with Revelation 3:20, which is of course out of context.


4

Here is a good overview on how the canon of the Tanakh and the canon of the New Testament came to be. It is by Dr. K. Wheeler of Carson-Newman University. Dr. Wheeler's web site is found here. The "Old Testament" In brief, the three-fold division of the Tanakh (i.e., the Torah, the Prophets, and the Writings) were likely "canonized" at different times in ...


4

The best reference for answering this question, is not surprisingly, from Bruce Metzger. He is probably the foremost textual critic of the 20th Century - a fact that both Dan Wallace and Bart Ehrmann would agree with. The UBS4 is, in large part, his baby. His work: The Canon of the New Testament: Its Origin, Development, and Significance can be found online ...



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