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There is no reference within the Old and New Testaments per se of an "Old Testament" or a "New Testament" section of the Bible. In the Latin translation of Against Heresies, written sometime between 175 and 185 AD, Irenaeus uses the phrase "Scripturae veteris Testamenti". The Latin word "testamentum" is derived from the Latin verb "testari", meaning to ...


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The Greek word "diatheke", according to Hebrews 9:15-17 means: "the will of the dying father for his children". In this "will" the father pledges to transfer his property to his children after he dies. For the will/the pledge to take an effect, it implies the death of the father. Thus, the Christians receive God's will/pledge/promise (the eternal salvation)...


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Inerrantists do not view the Masoretic text as inerrant in itself, but they consider it highly reliable. John Wenham, in Christ and the Bible (170ff.), outlines a variety of evidence for its faithful transmission of the original, all the while implying its imperfection: It was well known that the copying of the Scriptures had been carried out with ...


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Even though God said in the Mosaic that thou shall not kill but in the book of Numbers 15:32-36 He ordered Moses to make all the congregation to stone outside the camp. This situation does not break that law because God himself is the Author of that law. He is the maker of humankind and at that time the of Israel were under law but not Grace. Even the Bible ...


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The issue is most likely the numbering of the Psalms in your Bible. Your Georgian translation appears to use the Greek (Septuagint) numbering that is common in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Bibles, while the Bibles you are comparing against use the numbering of the Hebrew (Masoretic) text. Let's look at Psalm 109 as an example. According to the ...


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You are probably familiar with this already, but the 'original' Hebrew contained no vowels (see, e.g., Alan Smith's paper, "Introduction to Hebrew Verbs", or hebrew4christians.com). The effect would be similar to rendering "Love the Lord your God" as "Lv th Lrd yr Gd". As far as I know all the grammatical features of the verb would have been known from ...



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