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8

My understanding is that the passage quoted does not forbid all oaths in general, but in specific was addressing the practice of the Scribes and Pharisees, who were invoking the name of God, or heaven in their oaths, and breaking them. I don't see myself where the Scribes or Pharisees are mentioned specifically. I'd have to study it out further, but I do ...


7

The usages you give here are varied and not necessarily related. In today's English would could use the word hand as in to 'offer a helping hand' or to 'hand something over' or 'hand something out' or any number of other expressions. In the same way not every instance of the word 'thigh' necessarily refers to the same thing. The first two cases you give in ...


6

A very straight reading of Matthew and James would lead you to believe what Jeff wrote. But that may not be the end of it, or have anything to do at all with judicial oaths. Christ meant, as the Fathers and ecclesiastical writers explain, to be so truthful that men could believe them without need of oath to confirm what they say. He did not forbid the ...


5

Oaths generally refer to something you will/won't do. We are unable to control what will happen in the future, and therefore don't know if we will be able to keep that oath ("you cannot make even one hair white or black"). Paul, in this situation, was writing about what already happened. He already experienced it so he knows it is true. He doesn't need to ...


3

In ancient Israel putting right your hand on your inner thigh while giving an oath was the equivalent of how people put their right hand on a bible in modern times. The reason for the thigh was that there was a basic belief that the thigh equalized your walk and represented a well-balanced, just point of view.


3

If you want to know what the passage "literally meant," we should start with a literal translation. After all "unaware of it" is a paraphrase. This is literal: Leviticus 5:4 KJV Or if a soul swear, pronouncing with his lips to do evil, or to do good, whatsoever it be that a man shall pronounce with an oath, and it be hid from him; when he knoweth of it, ...


3

Gospel Truth The practice of swearing an oath on the Bible sits in the uncomfortable median between secular and religious practice. John Bouvier explains the motivation behind the practice in his Law Dictionary: OATH. A declaration made according to law, before a competent tribunal or officer, to tell the truth; or it is the act of one who, when ...


2

This question is very close to a pastoral advice question (which would make it off-topic) but I think it can be answered adequately. Breaking a promise would, to my knowledge, be regarded as sinful by all the branches of Christianity. This is why the Bible exhorts us to be wise, and to avoid making vows and oaths (James 5:12). With the possible exception ...


1

Matthew 5:33-37 and James 5:12 The bible is clear that swearing on anything and taking oaths is sinful. The premise is that you should always be trustworthy. If you are known to always tell the truth, then you would not need additional corroboration or incentive that you are telling the truth. Does it swearing an oath on the bible have any additional ...


1

As I have previously detailed elsewhere, In antiquity, divine names ortrue names were thought to hold power. This is best illustrated in an Egyptian myth about the god and goddess Ra and Isis. In this legend, Ra becomes injured, and Isis uses this fact as leverage to learn the divine name of Ra. Isis tells Ra that she can only heal him if she knows his ...



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