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26

Like the forefathers of those who eventually ended up in the Promised Land, Moses's problem was that he failed to trust in God. In chapter 12 of Numbers, Aaron and Miriam oppose Moses as God's messenger and their leader. As a result, they also are refused entry to the land (by death, like Moses). Moses' problem wasn't that he misinterpreted God or thought ...


17

The answer is right there in verse 12: And the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “Because you did not believe in me, to uphold me as holy in the eyes of the people of Israel, therefore you shall not bring this assembly into the land that I have given them.” It's a classic example of lack of faith. God tells Moses to do something that doesn't sound ...


15

This is not a very good Trinitarian objection for a number of reasons. First, the incarnation occurred at a definite point in history. As the Nicene/Constantinopolitan creed states, "[He] was made man." At the point Numbers became canonical, the Son of God was not yet incarnate. But perhaps more fundamentally, we should not read the Bible in a rigidly ...


10

When God said he should go with the men this was the second embassy of men from Balak to request Balaam's help. On the first occasion we see Balaam thinking he was a 'god dealer' trying to manipulate God and Balak, hoping to make the God of Israel give up on the Israelites and entice Him into league with Balak and at the same time get money from Balak for ...


9

Maybe, maybe not. Consider Job 9:6. Job 9:6 (DRA) 6 Who shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble.     Job is supposed to have lived around the time of Abraham, quite a while before the events that took place in numbers. Even if you consider Job to be a tall tale, its origin in oral tradition might ...


9

The section you quote contains the answer: because Moses did not believe. He was told to "tell the rock... to yield its water" but instead he struck the rock twice, apparently believing God's command to be insufficient. He expected God to act in exactly the same way as He had before*, but God apparently wanted to reveal His power to Moses in a new way. As ...


7

At the time of Nero Egypt had 7.5 million men: This country is extended as far as the Ethiopians, and Arabia the Happy, and borders upon India; it hath seven million five hundred thousand men, besides the inhabitants of Alexandria, as may be learned from the revenue of the poll tax; yet it is not ashamed to submit to the Roman government, although it ...


6

I think in order to answer this question, a short detour needs to be taken to John's Gospel, because in it Jesus Christ himself refers to this incident with Moses and the bronze serpent. In John 3:14-15, Jesus tells Nicodemus, "And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have ...


6

When you look further at the story, it becomes clear why God was angry at Balaam: he knew his heart, and he knew that his heart was not in the right place. God did not want Balaam to curse the Israelites or to bring trouble upon them in any way. But when his patron kept asking and insisting, Balaam kept trying to get God to reconsider. And when God ...


5

It is not that earthquakes themselves were new, but rather that an earthquake would have been directly caused by God to punish Korah in front of everyone that would have been new. Numbers 16:28 - 29 sets this up: Then Moses said, “This is how you will know that the LORD has sent me to do all these things and that it was not my idea: If these men die a ...


5

Christ is the main subject in the Old Testament "concealed". God speaks of Him in types and shadows. At Rephidim (Exodus 17:4) God told Moses to strike the Rock.The Rock is Christ (1st Corinthians 10:4), Moses represents the Law. Jesus was struck by Israel for presuming to violate the Law, for claiming to be God, which He is! When He was struck "crucified", ...


5

This is a bibliographic supplement to Mason Wheeler's answer, above. I'm fairly certain that the article he's trying to recall is this one: Colin J. Humphreys, "The Number of People in the Exodus from Egypt: Decoding Mathematically the Very Large Numbers in Numbers I and XXVI", Vetus Testamentum 48/2 (1998), pp. 196-213. While discussion of it has found ...


5

Yes. Hebrews 6:16 (KJV) That by two immutable things, in which it was impossible for God to lie, we might have a strong consolation, who have fled for refuge to lay hold upon the hope set before us: Matthew Henry's commentary on this verse points to Jesus as our present refuge: They are such as have fled for refuge to the hope set before them. ...


4

Eight verses earlier (Num 11:17) has the same "some of the spirit" wording. Fr. George Leo Haydock's commentary on verse 17 says: St. Augustine (q. 18,) reads "of the spirit which is on thee;" (Septuagint) referring it to the indivisible spirit of God, so that these ancients received what was sufficient for them, while Moses suffered no diminution. Thus ...


4

The analogy between type (the serpent) and anti-type (Jesus Christ) is only similar, not identical. To answer your question, King Hezekiah destroyed the brazen serpent because it became an idol, a false god, which the Israelites worshipped, and idolatry is forbidden according to the Law of Moses (Exo. 20:3). On the other hand, according to orthodox ...


3

I can't remember the source for this, but I recall reading an article explaining that the Hebrew words for "thousand" and "professional soldier" were very similar, different only in the vowels--which, this being ancient Hebrew, did not get written. (I believe the words were aleph and eleph, or something like that.) This is why we see accounts of tens of ...


3

Mosses was not punished for striking the rock instead of speaking to it. His sin is much larger than that.. His sin is that of blasphemy of the Holy Spirit. Numbers 20:10 Then Moses and Aaron gathered the assembly together before the rock, and he said to them, “Hear now, you rebels: shall we bring water for you out of this rock?” Moses is acting ...


3

You guys made some good points on this article. Just wanted to add to something else to support this qiestion. Moses was also complaining when he said his comments. The Hebrew word for Complain means: To Remain or Remaining. Because of this the children of Israel remained in the wilderness for 40 yrs. Moses also complained and he remained. They were ...


3

If Moses had said: "Okay, go ahead", would God have done it? You can take a look at the narrative of Abraham and Sodom (Genesis 18:16-33) as an example of this opposite case. Abraham, of course, doesn't say "Okay, go ahead and destroy Sodom"—but he doesn't ask for mercy either. His intercession is based on justice instead: it would be unjust, he ...


2

-We learn quite a bit about God's mercy from Paul in Romans 9. Here we actually see that God does not feel at all obligated to dole out mercy, but instead simply does so as it suits Him. If you do not read Romans 9 and finish it a little disconcerted, then you probably didn't read it right. Paul anticipates that you will not like what he is trying to ...


2

There is something else hidden in the sentence when Moses striked the rock when he was told to speak to it. Here he was believing in himself his soul power, not god's power. His eyes were lifted from god and it was on his soul power. Hence he also says, "Hear now, you rebels: shall we bring water for you out of this rock?” Remember Jeremiah 17:5 says ...


2

The rock symbolizes Jesus Christ who is to be crucified once. Striking the rock symbolizes crucifying Jesus Christ. After crucifying Jesus Christ (striking the rock), we ought to speak (pray) for solutions. However, Moses did strike (crucify) again and again! No one can ever or should never try to change the plans of God!


2

The snake that Moses raised up, symbolized the snakes that God sent into the Israelite camp as punishment for Israel's sin. Numbers 21:6 The Lord sent fiery serpents among the people and they bit the people, so that many people of Israel died. So the people came to Moses and said, “We have sinned, because we have spoken against the Lord and you; ...


2

Numbers 20:25–29 says (NABRE) Take Aaron and Eleazar his son and bring them up on Mount Hor. Then strip Aaron of his garments and put them on Eleazar, his son; but there Aaron shall be gathered up in death. Moses did as the LORD commanded. When they had climbed Mount Hor in view of the whole community, Moses stripped Aaron of his garments and put ...


2

The snake on a pole was a preview of Christ on the cross. Sort of a sneak-peek into the future. All healing is by Christ: But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. [Isaiah 53:5 KJV] This was prophesied 700 years before the ...


2

I really like this question. Unfortunately, my response, in trying to deal with the "modern" in modern biblical analysis, necessarily refers to non-scripture sources. Time of Apostles: Genesis 3:17 (Before Apostles) And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, ...


2

Four distinct nations First, it's important to understand that each of the four nations (other than Israel) mentioned here is distinct from the others, though they did have various interrelationships. Here are their origins in the Hebrew Table of Nations, and their territories at the time of the conquest of the Holy Land. It is surprisingly difficult to ...


2

Balaam's second prophecy, from which you quote, may not be reliable. The context of this passage is the story of a Moabite king Balak and questionable prophet named Balaam. Consider the introduction to the story from Numbers 22-24. Numbers 22:4-7 And Balak the son of Zippor was king of Moab at that time. So he sent messengers to Balaam the son of Beor, ...



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