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The practice of speaking in tongues is really only discussed in 1 Corinthians chapter 14, but Paul provides no information how to achieve this gift of the Holy Spirit, and appears to discourage it as he regards speaking in tongues as not being useful, compared to other gifts such as the ability to prophesy. In 1 Corinthians 14:6, he says that he would not ...


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A widespread belief around the middle of the first century was that the parousia would happen in the lifetimes of those still alive. For example, as Bart D. Ehrman points out in Forged, p106, Paul expected the second coming of Jesus imminently. This is made particularly clear in 1 Thessalonians 4:17, where he expected to be one of those present at the end: ...


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I would like to add a verse which clearly says that Jesus was in a house and not in the manger: Matthew 2:11: And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh. (emphasis added) ...


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In discussions in which I have been involved, the basis for this belief appears to be a need to harmonise the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. Luke 2:22 has the baby Jesus being taken from Bethlehem to Jerusalem for his circumcision, a little over a month after his birth, so at this stage he had not yet been taken from Bethlehem to Egypt, as we read in Matthew ...


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Mary and Simeon were prophesying. It is fairly common for Biblical prophecy (not the predictive kind) to be expressed in poetic language. However, the OT has whole books consisting entirely of poetry. The NT has only few passages here and there, hence there are no "poetic books" of the NT as there are of the OT.


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1 Corinthians chapter 13 is called the Hymn of Love and is thought to be a pre-Pauline hymn that Paul was quoting. Perhaps the most beautiful English rendition of the poem or song is the the King James Bible, but unfortunately it translates ἀγάπην as 'charity', rather that 'love'. The Hymn of Love, from the KJV, amended to speak of 'love': 1 Though I ...


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no proof that Jesus ate meat of any kind. Starting with genesis 18 abraham prepared for him (jesus) a bread, milk, butter and meat. But you should note that it is customerly when we have special guests we usually prepare for them something delicious most often meat inclusive, but no proof that Jesus or any of his companion angels who visited abraham ate meat ...


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Jesus is speaking of the children involved. One flesh is the offspring of the man and woman and the resulting family it creates. He is admonishing them not to separate the family. He goes on to say that this is not for eunuchs because they do not have children. This pericope ends with the little children coming unto Jesus.


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The story of Barabbas was an allusion to the scapegoat of Leviticus, not the other way around. Once we recognise the man Barabbas to be a literary creation, we may acknowledge that the story featuring the release of Barabbas was, in its entirety, a literary creation. The story parallels the Jewish practice of releasing a goat (the scapegoat) at Passover, to ...


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My answer is that faith does not cleanse the heart of man, Christ does. What the law could not do God did sending His Son; He condemned sin in the flesh. Faith is the instrument to believing that the work Christ has done is greater than the work of the law - the sacrifices and the priestly duties - and greater than the sin inherited from Adam. Behold the ...



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