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I believe this significant story of the two thieves on the cross represents : two groups of people who know word of God don,t do anything with it. And the group of people who take very serious.!!!this is our world today.!Please do something with the gospel of Jesus-Christ today. One the thieves gave a great tesmony about Christ and the other thief was ...


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Romans 8:29 To Paul, resurrection makes us all sons of God, but Jesus was the first. We see this in Romans 1:4, where Paul tells us Jesus was the Son of God by the fact of his resurrection: 4 And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead: Paul promised his followers that they ...


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Both "majority opinion" and "evangelical" (even with the guidelines you supplied) are slippery terms. They'll probably always be in a state of flux, so it's difficult to supply exactly what you've asked for. But don't panic. I think a relatively clear picture can still emerge. I've decided to give a sampling of three scholars who I think are firmly within ...


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John Shelby Spong describes the structure quite succinctly in Jesus for the NonReligious, pages 101-4. He says Mark organised the first narrative account of the death of Jesus in a twenty-four hour cycle, neatly divided into eight three-hour segments. A summary of Bishop Spong's explanation follows: Mark started the story "when it was evening" (Mark ...


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My answer is from the point of view of critical scholars, in other words experts who have studied the New Testament texts to establish who really wrote them and when. Sometimes, these scholars come up with some surprising conclusions. I will list the New Testament books in approximate chronological order, but alter this when necessary for clarity. It is ...


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Because we now know (*) that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were substantially based on Mark's Gospel, and because the Gospels of Matthew and Luke have additional material in common, believed to have come from the hypothetical 'Q' document, we can compare the three gospels and look for passages where other gospels use 'kingdom of God' where Matthew uses ...


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Perhaps Matthew has a theme of Jesus as King of the Jews, but certainly no more so than, for example, John's Gospel. While there are only about 5 actual references to Jesus as King of the Jews in Matthew, I also count 5 in Mark and 3 in Luke, with at least 11 such references in John, including the dramatic account of Pontius Pilate insisting on this being ...


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Although Mark only contains about 7 direct and indirect specific references to Jesus as the Son of God, this short gospel possibly places greater emphasis on Jesus as the Son of God than any other New Testament gospel, with its opening words containing this description of Jesus (*): Mark 1:1: The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; ...


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Raymond E. Brown says in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 164, there is wide scholarly agreement that Mark's Gospel was written in the late 60s or just after 70, and therefore the destruction of the temple was imminent or had already occurred. Burton L. Mack goes as far as to say, in Who Wrote the New Testament, page 152, it would not have made ...


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In Mark's Gospel, Jesus draws a clear distinction between God and himself. In Mark 10:18, Jesus calls God "good": And Jesus said unto him, Why callest thou me good? there is none good but one, that is, God. In Mark 13:32, Jesus says that only the Father knows just when the end will come: But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the ...


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The practice of speaking in tongues is really only discussed in 1 Corinthians chapter 14, but Paul provides no information how to achieve this gift of the Holy Spirit, and appears to discourage it as he regards speaking in tongues as not being useful, compared to other gifts such as the ability to prophesy. In 1 Corinthians 14:6, he says that he would not ...


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A widespread belief around the middle of the first century was that the parousia would happen in the lifetimes of those still alive. For example, as Bart D. Ehrman points out in Forged, p106, Paul expected the second coming of Jesus imminently. This is made particularly clear in 1 Thessalonians 4:17, where he expected to be one of those present at the end: ...


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I would like to add a verse which clearly says that Jesus was in a house and not in the manger: Matthew 2:11: And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh. (emphasis added) ...


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In discussions in which I have been involved, the basis for this belief appears to be a need to harmonise the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. Luke 2:22 has the baby Jesus being taken from Bethlehem to Jerusalem for his circumcision, a little over a month after his birth, so at this stage he had not yet been taken from Bethlehem to Egypt, as we read in Matthew ...


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Mary and Simeon were prophesying. It is fairly common for Biblical prophecy (not the predictive kind) to be expressed in poetic language. However, the OT has whole books consisting entirely of poetry. The NT has only few passages here and there, hence there are no "poetic books" of the NT as there are of the OT.


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1 Corinthians chapter 13 is called the Hymn of Love and is thought to be a pre-Pauline hymn that Paul was quoting. Perhaps the most beautiful English rendition of the poem or song is the the King James Bible, but unfortunately it translates ἀγάπην as 'charity', rather that 'love'. The Hymn of Love, from the KJV, amended to speak of 'love': 1 Though I ...



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