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There is no single verse declaring, "God is simple." But those who believe the doctrine believe that it is the only way to coherently hold onto all of the Bible's declarations about God. Catholicism and all the major Protestant confessions declare divine simplicity. The blog post Is divine simplicity scriptural? says: Simplicity is implicit in Scripture ...


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The Trinity is the teaching that there are "three persons in one Godhead." The GODHEAD The Greek word theotetos denotes “the state of being God.” This is literally translated in English as “Godhead” (God-ness/God-hood). Colossians 2:9 (KJV) In him dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily The nature of God is not material but spiritual ...


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Any question about God deserves answering. There is but one Living God told us in Holy Scripture... the 66 Books of the Bible comprising the Word of God completed and in full. Interestingly enough, when we read in Gen.1:1... "In the beginning God created..." is an incorrect translation of the word "Elohym" a "uni-plural proper noun translated incorrectly ...


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God is referred to by a number of names in the Old Testament, including Elohim, El Shaddai, Yahweh and, in Exodus 3:14 and Hosea 1:9, Ehyeh. The Book of Exodus includes the following dialogue between Moses and the God of Israel: Exodus 3:13-14, NRSV: But Moses said to God [Elohim], ‘If I come to the Israelites and say to them, The God [Elohim] of your ...


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What differences will being a Christian make in this life? There are as many reactions to being a Christian and having new and eternal life in Jesus as there are people. Sadly many do not seem to be any different than they were before they were Christian. 1 Corinthians 3:1-3 And I, brethren, could not speak unto you as unto spiritual, but as unto ...


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The question does not state any perspective from which to believe that being a Christian will make a difference in this world so, like each of the other answers, I will be as broad as possible. Most Christians believe that Christians set out to uphold high moral values and to help others. Many Christians do indeed try to do this and, by doing so, leave ...


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As some have commented on your question, the answer to this questions depends on who you ask, not only within a certain Christian denomination, but also within a specific tradition of such a denomination. A Catholic under the impression of the Thomistic tradition, for example, will tell you a different answer than a Lutheran under the Calvinistic tradition. ...


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The creator of all things is God. God is love, all powerful and all knowing.


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Wikipedia's list of Christian heresies turns up Audianism. This fourth-century group understood Genesis 1:27 to teach that God has a body like men. This is a form of anthropomorphism, which is more broadly defined by the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia as: Anthropomorphism is the ascription to the Supreme Being of the form, organs, operations, and general ...


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The number 7 has religious meaning in diverse religions, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism and ancient Near Eastern paganism. Leon R. Kass says in The Beginning of Wisdom, page 52, the Mesopotamians (Babylonians and Assyrians), before the coming of the Bible, already reckoned seven-day cycles, connected with the phases of the ...


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John Calvin does indeed treat this verse. He says: By saying אולי, auli, “if peradventure,” he made use of a common mode of speaking. God indeed has perfect knowledge of all events, nor had he any doubt respecting what would take place, when the prophets had discharged their duties; but what is pointed out here, and also condemned, is the obstinacy of ...


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We don't know, and it's possible we will never know in this life. We know that (1) God was like us (a literal spiritual father-child relationship), and (2) that we can be become like him (heirs of all that he has, and joint-heirs with Christ). Beyond that, little else is known about the exaltation of God. But only an account of this earth, and the ...


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God's unchanging nature is something fundamental in scripture, before there ever was a church council or New Testament tradition. It is not based on a Greek concept of perfection but a biblical concept of God. For I the Lord do not change (ESV, Malachi 3:6) To ask when it first showed up in church father writings would probably be the same as asking ...


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Writings Very early. At least as early as Justin Martyr, in The First Apology (~AD 150): For they proclaim our madness to consist in this, that we give to a crucified man a place second to the unchangeable and eternal God, the Creator of all; for they do not discern the mystery that is herein, to which, as we make it plain to you, we pray you to give ...


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Sister Simone kindly responded to my email asking this question. She said: "If I just said Holy Spirit, it would slide over like water. Also to an interfaith audience who doesn't necessarily hold a Trinitarian faith it seemed more inclusive to me. I also know that God continues to create us at every moment so it isn't just the "image" of God but God who ...


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Jacob to Israel The name Israel (Yisra'el) is commonly translated as "Wrestled with God", but it can also mean "Champion (or Prince) of God", "Striver with (or against) God", "Ruler (or Prince) over God", "God Prevails", "God Rules", "God will Rule", or possibly "God Who Will Rule". There are two quite different traditions in Genesis that set out to explain ...


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Not God the Father apparently, but perhaps Jesus. In Anatomy of the Vatican, page 20-21, Paul Hoffman says that in 1954, towards the end of his life, Pope Pius XII reported to some Jesuits that Jesus had appeared at his bedside during a recent illness and said to him that his time was not yet up. When the story found its way into the press, the Vatican had ...


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Summary: Calvinists interpret these passages as referring to God's righteousness and justice — that he is a fair judge, consistently judging sin as wrong, whether committed by rich or poor, strong or weak, native or foreigner. They do not indicate that God's gracious gifts — wealth, strength, and even salvation — are distributed equally to all. Calvinists ...


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Especially in recent years, I feel like this principle has been de-emphasized. Based on those quotes, it certainly sounds like, and reason seems to agree that God has a God, but that information is irrelevant to us. The most important principle is that for us, in this realm, there are no other Gods. I also don't think it is a coincidence that the ...


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I am technically a Christian (leaning agnostic) and for my part am quite certain NOTHING which EXISTS is definable in way using infinity as a quantitative value. At the risk of driving the conversation (answer I mean) into a no-man's land of tangential reference, it may of value to present an argument capable of rendering such questions impotent via means ...


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The question is better answered by understanding why God created at all and CCC 293 tells us the God created all things not to increase his glory, but to show it forth and to communicate it, for God has no other reason for creating than his love and goodness. The next point CCC 294 continues that God made us to be his sons through Jesus Christ, according to ...


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In the Bible there are various mentions of goddesses and female idols worshipped by the pagan nations surrounding the Israelites--which, of course, are rejected as false gods. By contrast, references to the God of the Israelites (which Christians see as the true God) are overwhelmingly male. Still, there are a few passages scattered throughout the Bible ...


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There are four distinct Hebrew words in the Old Testament which are typically translated into the English word ‘God’ when the scripture is referring to God the Father. (see Strong’s Concordance) The first example is the simple Hebrew word, ‘El’. The basic Hebrew rules of grammar identify this word as a singular, masculine title, meaning God or ‘Heavenly ...


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The idea of God within can either be explained rightly, or really badly. In the right understanding, Grace is the Holy Spirit entering us and infusing Divinity within us, making us a temple of the Spirit. Santifying Grace is partaking in Divinity, and can be understood as God placing Himself within us, to makes us Holy, for only God is Holy, so we must ...


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On the contrary, Moses writes "God, at the beginning of time, created heaven and earth (Genesis 1:1)." I say that Christianity can be discribed as a "quasi-panentheism." Panentheism, because God is definitely transcendent (I Am That Am), but is also immanent (like the passage from the Prophet Jeremiah). However, unlike panentheism proper, the Being that ...



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