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12

Names were considered to be meaningful in some way. For example, the younger of Isaac's twin sons with Rebekah was named Jacob ("supplanter") because when he was born he was holding on to Esau's heel, as if attempting to overtake him. (Genesis 25: 24-26) After Jacob's wrestle with the angel, when he demanded a blessing from the Lord, the angel pronounced ...


10

However, most Christians believe that God exists as three persons in one God-head. This may or may not be true. I think it is more true to say that nominal acquiescence of a statement of trinitarianism is widely understood as a 'red line' for acceptance by many denominations. The Nicine creed for example is clearly trinatarian, and so are many ...


10

The verses you quote give one very obvious reason: to fill the earth, take control of it, and rule it. This might be slightly more understandable by analogy to adopted children of a good king. The king desires his children to not just like him in title (accomplished simply by the adoption) but like him in character and action (rightly using authority ...


9

It is problematic whenever we attempt to separate the inseparable Trinity, so let us acknowledge that to begin with. The Bible never seems to suggest that the Holy Triune God has the capacity to love in varying measures. Indeed, God only knows one way to love. His love is complete and total--not partial. His love, like He Himself, does not increase or ...


7

The fruitfulness of the creation is something God intended according to the design of the world. He made the world a certain size intending that it become full of various things including vegetation, water, animals and man. To be fruitful is not a command as though fishes that did not propagate were sinful fishes, it is more of an 'ordinance of blessing' ...


7

If you look at the role of Jesus especially at the very end of time and the beginning of eternity (eternity for us, that is to say) he does not seem that different after all. When Jesus returns, he will not return as the contemporary hippie Jesus. That image is a product of modern humanistic culture and not the Jesus of scriptures. He will return as the King ...


7

I like your question. It is well thought out and sincere. As a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I strive to have a close relationship with my God. I will answer your questions to the best of my ability in the order they were asked. I will refer to hymns in my answer because they often convey the doctrine simply and beautifuly. ...


7

You have a couple different questions, but the main one seems to be in regard to Abraham and Jesus. Abraham and Jesus Abraham is only the ancestor of Jesus in His incarnation. Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant branches of Christianity teach that God is and has always been a Trinity of Father, Son and Spirit. The Son became a man and entered into His ...


7

This question is about authority. It is wrong for you to discipline children unless you are their parent, or their teacher, or their sports coach etc. The relationship you have determines what authority you have over someone. As our creator, God has complete authority over everyone. It is entirely right for him to kill any creature he made at any time for ...


6

In order to understand the evidence against the Trinity, you first need to understand the nature of the Trinity - that God is three persons who make up one God. You also need to understand the biblical basis FOR the Trinity. It is founded on a number of clear pieces of evidence: There is clear biblical evidence that Jesus is God. There is clear biblical ...


6

Genesis 1:28 (NIV) God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.” This was a blessing from God. Most of the other Bible translations also use the word "Be fruitful" and it indicates ...


6

I and my Father are one. John 10:30 Jesus and the Father had the plan of redemption from the beginning of this world. Their plans are the same because they are the same in thought. They love us immensely and equally. Their very essence is love. Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love 1 John 4:8 If you read through 1 ...


6

Normally, I don't link to my own sermons. But in this case, I'm going to make an exception. As a Baptist pastor, I wrote this sermon specifically to address this question - Why would God prohibit making graven images? The upthrust of the answer is that images stick the thing of which the image is made in a fixed point in time. And, the truth is, that as ...


6

The question seems to be based on a false premise. Most of Israel is not a desert. The Institute for Creation Research has an article discussing the ideal climate that exists in Jerusalem. A few excerpts: An Ideal Combination of Sun and Rain Most people think of Israel as a desert. They have seen pictures and drawings of caravans of camels ...


6

This is a powerful assertion of Deity by Jesus. You are correct that it is, in fact, Jesus Himself who is speaking here and not the Father. That is made clear in this passage, as Jesus was the One who "was dead" and is now "alive forevermore". 17 When I saw Him, I fell at His feet like a dead man. And He placed His right hand on me, saying, “Do not be ...


6

O felix culpa quae talem et tantum meruit habere redemptorem ("O happy fault that earned for us such and so great a redeemer") This is a very ancient concept in Christian theology. Essentially, Christian theology has long held that it was far better for God to bring good out of evil than it was not to permit the evil to happen in the first place. (I'm ...


5

tl;dr> NO! For Lewis, Pleasure is temporary, Joy reminds us of what is to come First and foremost, I should admit that if the canon ever gets re-opened, The Great Divorce is my vote for book #67. :) That said, C.S. Lewis has a very definite idea in mind when he says "Infinite Joy". In The Weight of Glory he writes: “It would seem that Our Lord finds ...


5

The Nicene Creed (Wikipedia: "It forms the mainstream definition of Christianity for most Christians.") answers this question (emphasis added): And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of his Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with ...


5

Looking at the context, one can see that the weakness and foolishness are seemingly so from a perspective of Jews (for whom the weakness of the cross is a stumbling block--this seems to be implied in the mocking presented by the chief priests, elders, and teachers of the law in Matthew 27:41-43, that God would express his power by physically saving his ...


5

According to the Westminster Confession of Faith: The Son of God, the second person in the Trinity, being very and eternal God, of one substance and equal with the Father, did, when the fulness of time was come, take upon Him man's nature,(1) with all the essential properties and common infirmities thereof, yet without sin;(2) being conceived by the ...


5

This is a pretty broad question, and you have to understand that there are varying views within Christianity. There's no one, single understanding, but here is a fairly comprehensive list. Assume in this list that it applies to most groups within Christianity unless otherwise noted. I'm going to ignore such groups a s "Christian Atheists" (Who would ...


5

A large part of the purpose of the Book of Jonah is to describe the universal power and sovereignty of God. Israel was not always monotheistic in her beliefs. Much of the early history of Israelite religion, as it can be seen in the Hebrew Bible, was actually what is called monolatrist, that is to say, she worshipped only one God but her religion did not ...


5

ericgorr's answer is really good, but let me write a slightly simpler one. Yes, absolutely God does love everyone. He totally wants the best for them and wants them to be the perfect person they were intended to be. Now the trouble is that for Hitler, being the best he was intended to be absolutely involves not killing millions of people and starting a ...


5

what I am asking is that you evaluate my interpretation of the Scriptures Faulty / Insufficient. The conclusions you have drawn from these verses are quite different from what most Christian scholars through the ages have concluded. In fact they are almost completely novel. Arriving at a novel conclusion not held by your own or any other major ...


5

No! God doesn't sleep nor needs to sleep. God is not a human. Indeed, he who watches over Israel will neither slumber nor sleep. (Psalm 121:4, NIV) I would mock and laugh at any god who needs to sleep. A god who needs to sleep is not a true God at all. The idea that God would sleep was humorous to Elijah the prophet. At noon Elijah began to make ...


5

Historically, the answer to the race issue has been the Table of Nations in Genesis 10. From Nigel Tomes: The tradition that Ham was a black man developed much later. It is a Rabbinical elaboration,7 not explicitly formulated until the Babylonian Talmud of 500 AD. Hence this concept belongs in the category of Jewish “myths and unending genealogies” (1 ...


5

I like to think of it this way: A carpenter has many creations. They make beautiful chairs, tables, cabinetry. He gets joy from his creations. A carpenter can also have children. However, all of his creations he makes to support his family or for his family to use. His true joy comes from his Children. He gets overfilled with joy as he sees his ...


5

Your question is essentially the age-old question of vitalism versus mechanism. That is, is life purely a process that can ultimately be understood and explained in terms of the same physics and chemistry that govern non-living things (mechanism), or is there something fundamentally different about living things (vitalism). Or to put it another way, is there ...


5

The simplest explanation is that God did not literally rest, but simply that he "rested from creating." From a Christian perspective, God did not rest, in the sense that he stopped doing anything, on the seventh day. In fact, he was then very active in his relationship with Adam and Eve, and all the rest of humanity.


5

Nontrinitarians disagree with the mainstream Christian understanding of the Trinity summarized by the Nicean council. That does not preclude the existance of Jesus before the first century AD. For example, Jehovah Witnesses believe Jesus was (and is) Michael the Archangel. And Mormons believe that God the Father exists in the form of a man and that Jesus ...



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