Hot answers tagged

15

This is not a very good Trinitarian objection for a number of reasons. First, the incarnation occurred at a definite point in history. As the Nicene/Constantinopolitan creed states, "[He] was made man." At the point Numbers became canonical, the Son of God was not yet incarnate. But perhaps more fundamentally, we should not read the Bible in a rigidly ...


11

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


11

Here are four common defenses of this doctrine: The masculine pronoun in Greek is applied to the Holy Spirit even when not required by Greek grammar The Holy Spirit is shown to be in a coordinating relationship with other persons, such as the Father and Son, as well as humans, suggesting that he also is a Person The Holy Spirit has personal attributes and ...


11

"Jealousy" in colloquial English, means either (1) indignation in response to infidelity, or (2) covetousness of the belongings of others. We can immediately eliminate the second case, because God cannot be covetous; everything is his. (Psalm 50:12) “If I were hungry I would not tell you, for the world is Mine, and all it contains." This jealousy that ...


9

The answer to your question lies in what each religion teaches about who God is. Islam From The Truth About Islam by Dr. David R. Reagan*: God — The Koran asserts that the god of Islam is the God of Christians and Jews (Sura 29:46). Nothing could be farther from the truth.7 The god of Islam, Allah, is most definitely not the God of the Bible. ...


8

TLDR; In this passage, Jesus uses language claiming God as a personal father; a begetting father, rather than in an abstract, "God is the Father of Humanity" sort of way. From here, the Jews performed simple deductive logic; the son of God is a god, therefore Jesus is claiming to be a god. More specifically, Jesus was claiming to be as divine as God, and ...


8

Unlike envy, which is the desire for things you do not rightfully possess, jealousy is the fierce protection of that which is rightfully yours. As such, the premise that jealousy is inherently sinful in your comparison is not accurate. Consider the case of Phinehas: 1 While Israel lived in Shittim, the people began to whore with the daughters of Moab. ...


7

From a Swedenborgian perspective, there is a simple answer and a complex answer to this question. The Simple Answer The simple answer does not require the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) at all. It only requires common human experience: Jesus was talking to himself. People often talk to themselves. Sometimes they even do it out loud! I doubt ...


7

Let me answer a few of your side-concerns before I get to your main question. Reformed theology stresses that God created the universe for one purpose: to glorify him fully I'm not certain how you're using the phrase "glorify him fully", but it could be interpreted to mean that God felt that he wasn't being glorified enough prior to creation, and ...


7

No, and in fact it is explicitly stated in LDS scriptures that such a revelation does not pertain to us: Moses 1: 35 But only an account of this earth, and the inhabitants thereof, give I unto you. For behold, there are many worlds that have passed away by the word of my power. And there are many that now stand, and innumerable are they unto ...


7

Hard Sayings of the Bible explains this simply: God's jealousy does not involve being suspicious or wrongfully envious of the success of others, or even mistrusting. When used of God, the word jealous refers to that quality of his character that demands exclusive devotion to all that is just, right and fair. Jealousy is the anger that God directs ...


7

Joseph Smith History 1:17 17 It no sooner appeared than I found myself delivered from the enemy which held me bound. When the light rested upon me I saw two Personages, whose brightness and glory defy all description, standing above me in the air. One of them spake unto me, calling me by name and said, pointing to the other—This is My Beloved Son. Hear ...


6

The short answer to the O.P.’s question that their will proceeds from the Divine Nature. There is only one Divine Will, and each Person wills with the very same Will. It is misleading to say that the Persons “share” the Divine Will, because that would seem to imply that its use is “distributed” among the Persons—like when people share a sandwich. In fact, ...


6

To R. C. Sproul and many other Christians, the word essence is a near-synonym of being or substance in a philosophical sense. It is the English word that he feels best conveys the meaning of the word that the Greeks used when describing unchangeable, ultimate reality: ousios (the present participle of the Greek verb "to be"). Sproul adopts a Platonic ...


6

Both God the Father and the Holy Spirit are spirits. For example, catholic.com states, ... verses, such as John 4:24, where Jesus teaches us: "God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth." This means God has no body, because a spirit is, by nature, an incorporeal being. The Church Fathers, of course, agreed, and ...


6

While how much philosophy has influenced the church on this can be debated, one only has to look to Scripture to see that God clearly operates outside time. The term "outside time" may mean different things to people. To to clarify I'm saying that in order to be considered outside time one must display the ability to Control time. Independent of time, ...


5

The Catholic Perspective I first ran across the word "spiration" in the discussion of the Holy Spirit's relation to the Trinity, found in Aquinas' Summa Theologica (First Part, Question 27). Aquinas has just finished talking first about God as an individual being, and then has begun discussing what it means for God to be a Trinity. He begins by talking ...


5

To understand the Reformed approach to this challenging question, we should begin with the concept of the "wills" of God. Reformed theologians typically refer to the relevant ones as the decretive (or "secret") and preceptive (or "revealed") wills of God, which R. C. Sproul defines as follows: Decretive will: The sovereign, efficacious will of God ...


5

This is a fantastic question. Here's my answer. Firstly, I would argue that the definition you use from Oxford English Dictionary is actually not as encompassing of the actual theology as it could be. Going against Oxford English Dictionary is a bold claim, so I'll provide another definition. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy “Panentheism” is a ...


5

John 3:16: For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. Romans 8:16-17: The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer ...


5

Introduction In language, words convey a meaning or idea. Much like the word Trinity conveys a theological concept that most protestants believe is found in scripture, the word "Trinity" itself is never found. This word was coined to describe an idea which previously had no accurate descriptor. Similarly, while the word ὁμοούσιος (homooúsios) which means ...


4

There is no single verse declaring, "God is simple." But those who believe the doctrine believe that it is the only way to coherently hold onto all of the Bible's declarations about God. Catholicism and all the major Protestant confessions declare divine simplicity. The blog post "Is divine simplicity scriptural?" says: Simplicity is implicit in ...


4

Before continuing, it should be noted that this topic is discussed among theologians, but there is no official teaching which all Catholics are bound to. That's true for most questions which begin with "Why doesn't God just?" This is especially true in a specific case. Your question is one of theodicy. It can be made briefer with "Why do good things happen ...


4

There are actually two similar ways that this passage is interpreted: That the "gods" and "lords" are the completely imaginary gods of the heathen That the "gods" and "lords" are supernatural beings that do exist, but are not divine Many commentators don't attempt to draw a distinction between these two, like George Leo Haydock (a Roman Catholic), who ...


4

(As always a draft). The key word that I will try to portray is a model. But first some definitions when dealing with the Trinity. It is necessary to point out the difference between the essential Trinity and the economical Trinity. The essential Trinity is a matter of the essence of the Triune God for His eternal existence; the economical Trinity is a ...


4

The earliest use of οὐσία to mean the substance or essence of a thing is by Aristotle in his Κατηγορίαι, though Aristotle attributes its earlier use to Plato. Justin Martyr comments on Aristotle's description of the nature of the Divine, confirming that Aristotle (along with Plato) uses the word in the manner described as early as the 4th century BC. So it ...


4

In addition to the references in Staples' answer, there is a statement in the book of Doctrine & Covenants: The Father has a body of flesh and bones as tangible as man’s; the Son also; but the Holy Ghost has not a body of flesh and bones, but is a personage of Spirit. Were it not so, the Holy Ghost could not dwell in us. D&C 130:22 I'd also ...


4

Does God desire that all men be Catholic? The answer to the O.P. is fundamentally “yes:” the Church teaches that it is the Catholic Church—that is, the universal Church—and hence that God calls all people to be members. Lumen Gentium [LG], Vatican II’s dogmatic constitution on the Church, puts it as follows: All men are called to belong to the new ...


3

Summary: Evangelical commentators don't take the "making himself equal with God" phrase as a referring only to Jesus's claim that God is his Father, but to his claim that he acts like his Father. Understanding the context here is important. Here's the full passage (John 5:16–18): 16 And this was why the Jews were persecuting Jesus, because he was doing ...


3

The following Ante-Nicene church fathers believed in Jesus as the eternal Son: 2nd century Irenaeus (AD. 120-200) said: "But the Son, eternally co-existing with the Father, from of old, yea, from the beginning, always reveals the Father to Angels, Archangels, Powers, Virtues..." (Against Heresies, Book II, ch. 30, section 9) Athenagoras ( A.D. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible