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12

Because he wants to, and certainly not because of anything they've done or will do. One of the central tenants of this concept for Calvinists is that it's not what you do (or have done, or even will do) that merits you salvation. It is wholly and completely the grace of God, not just that you were chosen, but that you were then called, and then compelled to ...


11

In the terms you describe, most - if not all - forms of Christianity are Monotheistic in nature. That said, there are three key concepts (that again most forms of Christianity subscribe to) that are somewhat comparable to 'Shivoham' as you've described it: God's Immanence, the Indwelling of the Holy Spirit in a believer, the Glorification of believers. ...


9

God didn't lie God knew that Pharaoh would say "no" to this request, and since we know the outcome of the story we can think that God intended for Israel to stay put all along and never intended them to journey into the wilderness. But the simple fact of the matter is we cannot assume that. We can assume that God did intend for the Israelites to go into the ...


8

You have a couple different questions, but the main one seems to be in regard to Abraham and Jesus. Abraham and Jesus Abraham is only the ancestor of Jesus in His incarnation. Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant branches of Christianity teach that God is and has always been a Trinity of Father, Son and Spirit. The Son became a man and entered into His ...


8

This question is about authority. It is wrong for you to discipline children unless you are their parent, or their teacher, or their sports coach etc. The relationship you have determines what authority you have over someone. As our creator, God has complete authority over everyone. It is entirely right for him to kill any creature he made at any time for ...


7

The Scripture does tell us that Jesus can be sorrowful enough to cry: When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come along with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in spirit and troubled. 34 “Where have you laid him?” he asked. “Come and see, Lord,” they replied. Jesus wept. John 11:33-35 Jesus was on his way to see Lazarus. He had ...


7

Yes, and not only is it a severe misunderstanding of pretty much all of our doctrine to think we believe otherwise, but there are also so many scriptures that could be cited in this regard, that one answer probably can't cover all of this question. I try to use the most clear scriptures I can find. Obviously there are many New Testament scriptures that ...


7

Trinitarians believe that Jesus being human does not contradict his status as God (or as the Spirit). Even though Jesus is God, he made himself into physical human being, and through this he was able to experience life fully as a man. Philippians 2:5-8 KJV Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: Who, being in the form of God, thought it ...


6

O felix culpa quae talem et tantum meruit habere redemptorem ("O happy fault that earned for us such and so great a redeemer") This is a very ancient concept in Christian theology. Essentially, Christian theology has long held that it was far better for God to bring good out of evil than it was not to permit the evil to happen in the first place. (I'm ...


6

Eternal is a Latin word late 14c., from Old French eternel "eternal," or directly from Late Latin aeternalis, from Latin aeternus "of an age, lasting, enduring, permanent, everlasting, endless," contraction of aeviternus "of great age," from aevum "age" (see eon). Used since Middle English both of things or conditions without beginning or end and ...


5

The simplest explanation is that God did not literally rest, but simply that he "rested from creating." From a Christian perspective, God did not rest, in the sense that he stopped doing anything, on the seventh day. In fact, he was then very active in his relationship with Adam and Eve, and all the rest of humanity.


5

Nontrinitarians disagree with the mainstream Christian understanding of the Trinity summarized by the Nicean council. That does not preclude the existance of Jesus before the first century AD. For example, Jehovah Witnesses believe Jesus was (and is) Michael the Archangel. And Mormons believe that God the Father exists in the form of a man and that Jesus ...


5

Your main dilemma here is on the authenticity of the Bible. On the authenticity of the Bible: It is indeed a complicated topic to discuss about the authenticity of the Bible. However, there are enough manuscripts available to produce the original text of the Bible. This question "How authentic is Codex Sinaiticus?" may help you get a better idea on original ...


5

Catholic Perspective Tackling the sin part Highlighting a false premise, that one must experience something for one to know/understand it. It is worth noting that experience is a type of knowledge ... This is actually quite a loaded question philosophically, theologically, etc. Theologically, there is always mystery. 2 Timothy 2:13 (RSVCE) 13 ...


5

Your question is a creative one and as humans we tend to think in human terms. In our day however we have a greater capacity of understanding how such things could even be possible. I'm going to use the example of computer games as what might be a humanly relatable comparison. I'm usually not one to use elaborate world-oriented illustrations, but this ...


5

Why Did God Create the Universe (or, at least, Humanity)? The answer to that will speak to your question about God's foreknowledge. I will propose an executive summary: the purpose of humanity1 is to know and love God. (Jn 17:3) The testimony of the Scripture is at least compatible with this idea, though I find more than just circumstantial evidence in ...


5

In Jewish times, the source of the fire in the sanctuary was from God. Initially, when they first laid the sacrifice as an offering at the alter, fire was literally sent from God and consumed it (Leviticus 9:24). Since then it was to be kept continually burning. (Leviticus 6:12-13). Thus Nadab and Abihu displayed wanton presumptuousness by lighting fire ...


5

"and the similitude of the Lord shall he behold" (Numbers 12:8). This is the answer. The Lord only showed a representation of Himself, at times in the figure of a man. No one saw His spiritual essence. As we see elsewhere in Scripture, frequently when men saw an angel, they fell as dead men; how much more would it be to see the essence of God? Also, The ...


5

Many Christians, and I am one of those; who believe that God knows everything, controls everything, and is everywhere simultaneously. This idea is commonly known as God being omniscient, omnipotent, and Omnipresent. To most of us that simply means that God is with his people at all times, that God knows everything and every circumstance that will take place ...


5

Omnipotence means that God can do anything. But "anything" does not include nonsensical strings of words, like "kill God" or "round square" or "a rock so heavy that God can't lift it". C.S. Lewis once explained this point by saying that nonsense does not make sense just because we say "God can" in front of it. After this accelerated tour from atheism to ...


4

Here is an answer from one young Earth creationist. Apparently you got your Scripture from the Hebraic Roots version of the Bible, or the New revised King James version since these are the only versions I know of which say: Genesis 3:8 HRS And they heard the sound of YAHWEH Elohim walking up and down in the garden at the breeze of the day. And the man ...


4

I'm new here. I see that this post has no answer by an actual LDS member, and those answers that are given are not really representative of our beliefs (due mostly to lack of familiarity with the beliefs in question). So even though this is late, I’m going to try to answer it. First of all, we absolutely believe that God’s existence is eternal—as is the ...


4

What you are asking about is the rationale behind a doctrine called 'the preservation of Scripture'. The doctrine basically seeks to answer whether or not God will preserve his infalliable message, even though it is transmitted by fallable men. How are the Scriptures Transmitted? (A Primer on Preservation) A straw man would pit Jesus saying, "Surely I ...


4

It just so happens that the Catholic Encyclopedia has an article on this. Their definition is much broader than the one you provided. It actually has extensive notes on several meanings of the term. the section in the term in the context of theology is as follows: The term Monism is not much used in theology because of the confusion to which its use ...


4

Aquinas addresses the question from different angles a number of places in the Summa Theologica, in various parts of the "Treatise on the Most Holy Trinity" (First Part, Questions 27–43). The fundamental question is answered more or less directly in Question 27, "The Procession of the Divine Persons". Article 2 of this question, "Whether any ...


4

This question, as worded, might might not be best for this site, but I see an answerable question that can be answered by some of the most fundamental Christian thinking. The question is essentially, "Why do Christians insist that everyone is a sinner even though a large portion of people are decent people?" It is clear through out the Bible that everyone, ...


4

You appear to be making the most prevalent misconception that people make. That misconception is that the physical realm is the true realm, while in truth it is the Spiritual realm which is predominant. Just so that I do not confuse you let me explain things this way. The physical realm exists in the Spiritual realm. By that what is meant is that the ...


4

The premise to your question is that "the word eternal might mean continuing forever from some point in time." Just so you know, this is a fairly ambiguous starting point. There are some contexts and perspectives where the meaning of the word eternal is only no end, but others where eternal means no beginning and no end. And this is not necessarily specific ...


4

Some quick, important notes about your references before answering your question directly: Moses is not clearly justified in killing the Egyptian. He fled as a guilty man because he committed murder. There are many instance of men taking justice into their own hands, but this does not mean it was good for them to do so. God continues to bring judgment and ...



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