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11

In the terms you describe, most - if not all - forms of Christianity are Monotheistic in nature. That said, there are three key concepts (that again most forms of Christianity subscribe to) that are somewhat comparable to 'Shivoham' as you've described it: God's Immanence, the Indwelling of the Holy Spirit in a believer, the Glorification of believers. ...


11

Here are four common defenses of this doctrine: The masculine pronoun in Greek is applied to the Holy Spirit even when not required by Greek grammar The Holy Spirit is shown to be in a coordinating relationship with other persons, such as the Father and Son, as well as humans, suggesting that he also is a Person The Holy Spirit has personal attributes and ...


10

I am not aware of a verse that says explicitly that "God loves everyone equally". In fact, there are some verses to suggest that some are loved more than others, which is not your question so will be neglected1, but there are several that indicate that God indeed loves all people. The first is probably the most quoted Bible verse of all time: For God so ...


10

Summary: Calvinists interpret these passages as referring to God's righteousness and justice — that he is a fair judge, consistently judging sin as wrong, whether committed by rich or poor, strong or weak, native or foreigner. They do not indicate that God's gracious gifts – wealth, strength, and even salvation – are distributed equally to all. Calvinists ...


10

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


9

The answer to your question lies in what each religion teaches about who God is. Islam From The Truth About Islam by Dr. David R. Reagan*: God — The Koran asserts that the god of Islam is the God of Christians and Jews (Sura 29:46). Nothing could be farther from the truth.7 The god of Islam, Allah, is most definitely not the God of the Bible. ...


8

Writings Very early. At least as early as Justin Martyr, in The First Apology (~AD 150): For they proclaim our madness to consist in this, that we give to a crucified man a place second to the unchangeable and eternal God, the Creator of all; for they do not discern the mystery that is herein, to which, as we make it plain to you, we pray you to give ...


8

John Calvin does indeed treat this verse. He says:1 By saying אולי, auli, “if peradventure,” he made use of a common mode of speaking. God indeed has perfect knowledge of all events, nor had he any doubt respecting what would take place, when the prophets had discharged their duties; but what is pointed out here, and also condemned, is the obstinacy of ...


7

As Caleb pointed out, most of these verses you have quoted aren’t actually using the word “soul” to refer to the same theological concept you’re trying to get at. As an addendum to that, I note that one reason for that discrepancy in usage is that you’ve selected a bunch of New Testament verses that are quoting the Septuagint. Matthew 12 is quoting Isaiah ...


7

The O.P. asks about the Catholic position regarding the “emotions” of God, especially as found in the Old Testament. Based both on Scripture and sound philosophical principles, the Church holds that strictly speaking God (in His Divine Nature) does not have emotions in the same sense that human beings do, for the simple reason that He is not a human being. ...


7

TLDR; In this passage, Jesus uses language claiming God as a personal father; a begetting father, rather than in an abstract, "God is the Father of Humanity" sort of way. From here, the Jews performed simple deductive logic; the son of God is a god, therefore Jesus is claiming to be a god. More specifically, Jesus was claiming to be as divine as God, and ...


6

To R. C. Sproul and many other Christians, the word essence is a near-synonym of being or substance in a philosophical sense. It is the English word that he feels best conveys the meaning of the word that the Greeks used when describing unchangeable, ultimate reality: ousios (the present participle of the Greek verb "to be"). Sproul adopts a Platonic ...


6

In the Bible there are various mentions of goddesses and female idols worshipped by the pagan nations surrounding the Israelites--which, of course, are rejected as false gods. By contrast, references to the God of the Israelites (which Christians see as the true God) are overwhelmingly male. Still, there are a few passages scattered throughout the Bible ...


6

God's unchanging nature is something fundamental in scripture, before there ever was a church council or New Testament tradition. It is not based on a Greek concept of perfection but a biblical concept of God. For I the Lord do not change (ESV, Malachi 3:6) To ask when it first showed up in church father writings would probably be the same as asking ...


6

From a Swedenborgian perspective, there is a simple answer and a complex answer to this question. The Simple Answer The simple answer does not require the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) at all. It only requires common human experience: Jesus was talking to himself. People often talk to themselves. Sometimes they even do it out loud! I doubt ...


6

Both God the Father and the Holy Spirit are spirits. For example, catholic.com states, ... verses, such as John 4:24, where Jesus teaches us: "God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth." This means God has no body, because a spirit is, by nature, an incorporeal being. The Church Fathers, of course, agreed, and ...


6

While how much philosophy has influenced the church on this can be debated, one only has to look to Scripture to see that God clearly operates outside time. The term "outside time" may mean different things to people. To to clarify I'm saying that in order to be considered outside time one must display the ability to Control time. Independent of time, ...


5

Yes, it's long! Yes, I know this is a long answer. Sorry about that! However, given the huge amount of ink (and pixels) that has been expended on the doctrine of the Trinity for almost two thousand years now, I do not see how justice can be done to the subject in the brief answers that are preferred here on StackExchange. I therefore ask for your patience ...


5

The short answer to the O.P.’s question that their will proceeds from the Divine Nature. There is only one Divine Will, and each Person wills with the very same Will. It is misleading to say that the Persons “share” the Divine Will, because that would seem to imply that its use is “distributed” among the Persons—like when people share a sandwich. In fact, ...


5

God created you, so for sure he knows you! God is also watching each one of us and he loves ❤ us. And yes, there are quotations, to be sure! Job 28:24 For he looks to the ends of the earth and sees everything under the heavens. 1 John 3:19-20 By this we shall know that we are of the truth and reassure our heart before him; for whenever our heart ...


5

The official position of the Catholic Church is that the Church is synonymous with the "chosen nation," and that the Church in Christ is the continuation of the righteous nation that God has set apart for himself since the beginning. Through the Catechism, the Church states that while God chose Abraham and his descendants through the promise the be his ...


5

This is a fantastic question. Here's my answer. Firstly, I would argue that the definition you use from Oxford English Dictionary is actually not as encompassing of the actual theology as it could be. Going against Oxford English Dictionary is a bold claim, so I'll provide another definition. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy “Panentheism” is a ...


5

The Catholic Perspective I first ran across the word "spiration" in the discussion of the Holy Spirit's relation to the Trinity, found in Aquinas' Summa Theologica (First Part, Question 27). Aquinas has just finished talking first about God as an individual being, and then has begun discussing what it means for God to be a Trinity. He begins by talking ...


4

There is no single verse declaring, "God is simple." But those who believe the doctrine believe that it is the only way to coherently hold onto all of the Bible's declarations about God. Catholicism and all the major Protestant confessions declare divine simplicity. The blog post "Is divine simplicity scriptural?" says: Simplicity is implicit in ...


4

St. Thomas Aquinas holds that God can do anything except whatever implies a contradiction. Treating "Whether God is omnipotent?," he writes: [T]his phrase, "God can do all things," is rightly understood to mean that God can do all things that are possible; and for this reason He is said to be omnipotent. and [N]othing is opposed to the idea of ...


4

FIRST THINGS FIRST I hate to sound like Pilate, but "What is love?" A decent answer to your question depends first on an answer that question, particularly as it relates to God's love for us human critters. We're all somewhat familiar with the "four loves": the love of friends (phileo), the love of family members (storge), the love of romance and ...


4

The term the Nicene Creed uses for substance is homooúsios. This term was intentionally chosen to separate the Creed from various forms of Arianism that denied the divinity of Jesus. The Nicene Creed is arguing that Jesus is fully divine just like the Father. The common forms of nontrinitarianism at the time commonly denied the divinity of Christ by arguing ...


4

Before continuing, it should be noted that this topic is discussed among theologians, but there is no official teaching which all Catholics are bound to. That's true for most questions which begin with "Why doesn't God just?" This is especially true in a specific case. Your question is one of theodicy. It can be made briefer with "Why do good things happen ...


4

There are actually two similar ways that this passage is interpreted: That the "gods" and "lords" are the completely imaginary gods of the heathen That the "gods" and "lords" are supernatural beings that do exist, but are not divine Many commentators don't attempt to draw a distinction between these two, like George Leo Haydock (a Roman Catholic), who ...


3

It's true that the reformed definition of sovereignty leads to limited atonement, but the relationship between sovereignty and atonement is different from that of sovereignty and commands (like the call to repent and believe). The reason is that in the first pairing, there is an intermediate step: election. This step is sometimes not explicitly mentioned, ...



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