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36

To date, every test science has been able to make has been done on the created universe1. It is not possible to run the tests on the person or being of the creator directly. Thus what we know about God we derive from what He reveals to us2. His creation still tells us something about Him, but they are deductions from nature. Nature itself is not God3 and God ...


15

The apparent contradiction comes from the fact that you are misunderstanding the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. From Wikipedia: The Heisenberg uncertainty principle states precise inequalities that constrain certain pairs of physical properties, such as measuring the present position while determining future momentum of a particle. Of course, ...


10

We are limited by our perceptions. Have you heard the old mathematical thought experiment about an existence where everything was restricted to a two-dimensional plane, and if a sphere were to pass through this plane, it would appear to be a circle that grows larger and smaller without any discernible cause for its change in size? If we keep this concept ...


10

I can only speak for Calvin. AFAIK, he never explicitly interacts with Aquinas or the Summa. In Institutes he does reference "The Schoolmen" many times, but he seems to have in mind mostly later-medieval theologians rather than the angelic doctor himself. That's a shame, because Aquinas would have been a much more worthy opponent. Protestants in general ...


9

The bible is rather emphatic on the point actually. The universe we live in was not only created at God's command but it is sustained constantly through his active will. This sustainer is Jesus Christ: Colossians 1:15-17 (ESV) 15  He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16  For by him all things were created, in ...


8

To state it simply, this question takes the presupposition that God, the author of creation, is bound by the laws he created for this universe. And he simply is not so bound. He is outside of this creation. Not only that, but he sustains this creation by his will - were it not for his continuing upholding of it, it would pop out of existence, quite ...


8

Yes, in the eyes of the Catholic Church, under the guidance of the Pontifical Council for the Family abortion has been likened to murder. The moral gravity of procured abortion is apparent in all its truth if we recognize that we are dealing with murder and, in particular, when we consider the specific elements involved. The one eliminated is a human ...


6

One of the founding ideas of Protestantism was "sola scriptura", meaning that we view the Bible as the only ultimate authority. That doesn't mean that we refuse to read any other books. The existence of thousands of Baptist bookstores should be adequate proof that that's not true. What it means is that we do not view any book other than the Bible as having ...


6

Note: I am providing an exhaustive answer as it is difficult to find this subject being answered to any degree of depth anywhere. I think the answer can only be found by contrasting how these two covenants differ. These covenants largely differed: in their time in history, location, atmosphere, persons who inaugurated them, the persons who acted as ...


6

There have been several objections to Heisenberg and Bohr's interpretation of the Uncertainty Principle, most notably the work of Albert Einstein and Karl Popper. In the end it comes down to a question of belief - does the uncertainty principle only provide a mathematical description of a deterministic reality, or does reality really act that way? So even ...


5

The way I "square this fact" with my "belief in an omniscient God", is that since God created the universe, dimensions, time, etc, then He exists outside of them. What is uncertain to us is known to Him. Referencing an article I wrote a few years ago, Perhaps God is infinite to us, and to all who interact with Him, because He exists above the dimensions ...


5

If you take the matter wave interpretation of quantum mechanics, the problem with the uncertainty principle is not that the measurements are imprecise, but that the actual distribution of the position and wavelength of a particle cannot be reduced to zero at the same time. So it can be viewed not that the momentum is unknown if the position is exactly fixed, ...


4

I'm not sure about an answer that applies to all of Christianity. but as it happens, the subject of obeying rules we think are dumb came up in Sunday School this very morning. So, from a Baptist perspective: Romans 13:1-2 (KJV) says 1 Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ...


4

We ask "is it okay to _" because many Christians were raised on moral religiosity instead of principles of Christian decision making. Based on the second greatest commandment to love our neighbors as ourselves (Matthew 22:39), Jesus calls everyone to love every human being they come into contact with (including themselves). And to love means to seek what ...


4

James Dolezol, a recent doctoral graduate of Westminster Seminary in Philadelphia, has written a book (which was his dissertation) on divine simplicity in which he traces the agreement of Reformed scholasticism to Thomist scholasticism on the doctrine of God. I have not yet read this book, but I was told about it by a friend of Dolezol's, and I listened to ...


3

In the eyes of natural moral law and the church direct abortion is tantamount to murder (whether the legislature agrees or not). Direct abortion is when one chooses to intentionally abort a fertilized egg. However, indirect abortion is not tantamount to murder. Indirect abortion is when one does something that is not intended to harm the child, but the ...


3

The overly simple answer is: Natural Law is a human person's participation in the Eternal Law (the knowable part of which is called Divine Law). While Peter Turner's answer covered all of the essential points, St. Thomas Aquinas' coverage of the topic is the benchmark among the Doctors of the Catholic Church and one summary of it (among many, I am sure) ...


3

Any answer to this question will be pure speculation - the Bible doesn't say why there are these two "classes" (the question of the existence of said classes I'll leave alone for now), so we don't know. With that said, here are two potential reasons that are Scripturally based: God is sovereign over everything, and is pleased to work out his will through ...


3

In his book, First Comes Love, Scott Hahn outlines a concept of God that is in concert to this question. He cites a writing of Pope John Paul II. “In the light of the New Testament it is possible to discern how the primordial model of the family is to be sought in God Himself, in the Trinitarian mystery of His life. The divine “We” is the eternal ...


3

I don't think there is a definitive answer to your question as asked. You're not asking for an objective fact, like "what is the boiling point of hydrogen peroxide at sea level?" You're asking for a classification. Different people could classify the same things many different ways. Like suppose I asked you what different kinds of motor vehicle there are. If ...


2

I think these kind of questions often betray a deeper problem: a lack of understanding of the primary importance questions of doctrine that you mention. They often stem from an understanding of Christianity as a set of cultural norms or a rulebook of right and wrongs instead of hearts that have been remade from stone to flesh. I do think it is valid that ...


2

Aeoril says: "The idea of 'Natural Moral Law', if you are referring to the idea that one can discern moral truths from pure philosophical pursuits is something I would argue is untenable." I would suggest that you read Cicero's "De Legibus" ("On the Laws"). Within, you will find that Cicero arrives at many conclusions about of God and His law which ...


2

Sin is absolutely objective but in its application in our lives has a subjective element. The particular case that you mention is where Paul is saying if a person thinks something is a sin (even though it is not) then it is a sin to that person if they run about doing what their conscience condemns. This is because anything done without faith is a sin: ...


2

Sin is not an idea or a component of a "moral system". God's laws are not based on a notion of right or wrong, but are based on God's personal nature and therefore how He wants us to be. This doesn't mean that it's not wrong to sin - you can say to a degree that it invariably is wrong to sin - but to stress that sin itself isn't about good/bad, ...


2

Generally speaking the intentions/motivations of the person make it right/wrong or allowable/forbidden. Sin has always been rebellion against God—generally speaking, doing something that you believe to be wrong. The Jews had some mandates about accidental sins, but with the atonement that Jesus made, I don't see how there's a need for any form of repentance ...


1

The Church has always upheld the State's right to protect its citizens, so my take on it is yes, life sentences are in accord as long as that is truly what is required to protect the people. Each specific case has to be considered individually, of course. [Edit] I've done some research in an attempt to find sources. Here is an interesting one: Catholic ...


1

What is and is not a sin is not subjective. Scripture gives a very clear definition of sin in 1 John 3:4. Sin is transgression of the Law. What is subjective is our understanding of what sin is. We're flawed finite creatures, with varying preconceptions, who are taught various different things (whether those things are right or wrong) and ...


1

Unless we have an understanding of philosophical methods, we would have no idea of the validity of any work claiming to be an exposition of the Bible. One could read the Summa, but unless you know how it lacks, it would be pointless. The Divine Law, its requirements, the right approach meet those requirements, all this require a proper understanding of the ...


1

I am not sure about the "Evangelical take", but as a disciple of Christ who studies and lives and speaks in communion with other Christians, I have come to certain conclusions about truth. The idea of "Natural Moral Law", if you are referring to the idea that one can discern moral truths from pure philosophical pursuits is something I would argue is ...


1

I agree that just versus unjust is an insufficient classification for this purpose. Let me suggest three categories: Just laws: Those that reiterate God's laws, like laws against murder and theft. This is the easy case. Of course we should obey these. Even if the government didn't make such a law, we should be doing this anyway because we are obeying God's ...



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