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45

According to the definition of "in vain", I'd say yes, it is in vain. in vain, a. without effect or avail; to no purpose: to apologize in vain. b. in an improper or irreverent manner: to take God's name in vain. While it may not be directly insulting or condemning God in any way, I would say that "Oh my God" is not using his name in a reverent ...


42

In addition to a_hardin's analysis, it's important to consider the original meaning of the commandment. To take God's name didn't mean swearing (profanity), it meant swearing an oath in the name of the Lord. Swearing falsely was an extremely serious matter and continues to be one today in Semitic cultures, but to swear falsely (in vain) in the name of God ...


33

Before it meant the son of a king, or someone who was not yet king, the original sense of the word 'prince' was someone of the highest rank. (It's related to the word 'principal'.) The Hebrew word שָׂר used in the original seems to have the same idea in it.


32

Elohim Genesis 1:1 (ESV) 1 In the beginning, God [Elohim] created the heavens and the earth. Pslam 19:1 (ESV) 1 The heavens declare the glory of God, [Elohim]    and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. The name "Elohim" means "God" and is a reference to God's power and might. Adonai Malachi 1:6 (ESV) … And if I am a master, where is my fear? ...


22

There's a problem with one of your assumptions: Jehovah's Witnesses don't use Jehovah "to be accurate". They use Jehovah because they think it's important to call God by name, and because Jehovah is the traditional rendering in English. They accept that the original pronunciation has been lost, and argue that were it important, Jehovah God would not have ...


18

There is a significant distinction between calling God "mother" and the Bible identifying aspects of motherhood (and fatherhood) as reflecting the glory and character of God. Both men and women reflect the glory and character of God in different ways, as men and women, fathers and mothers, teachers, judges, etc. However, God is spirit (John 4:23) and not ...


17

A convention in many Bibles is to do exactly as you say - convert the Tetragrammaton (YHWH) into LORD. To be sure, you should look at your Bible's preface. In the New Testament, which was composed in Greek, the word Kurios (e.g. Kyrie Elesion) is a title as opposed to a Proper Name. To be clear: יהוה (Yahweh) = LORD - specific name, אֲדֹנָי (Adonai) = ...


16

From "The Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels" Thus: “When E. Hiyya ben Adda died … R. Levi received his valuables. This was because his teacher used to say: ‘The disciple of bar nāšâ is as dear to him as his son.’ ” Here the expression plainly refers to the group of teachers It is suggested that the idiom was used as a form of self-reference in ...


16

The word "Christ" is simply the English transliteration of the Greek word "Χριστός" (pronounced "khristós"). It has the same meaning as the word "Messiah" which is simply a loose English transliteration of the Hebrew word "מָשִׁיחַ" (pronounced "mashíach"). Therefore, you'll find the word "Christ" used in translations of the New Testament and the word "...


14

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, (Matthew 28:19, NIV) I charge you, in the sight of God and Christ Jesus and the elect angels, to keep these instructions without partiality, and to do nothing out of favoritism. (1 Timothy 5:21, NIV) The core difference is ...


11

David, of course, was the second King of Israel (later just Judah) who had descendants also upon the throne. We see that Jesus was indeed descended in direct lineage from David through many generations. In some cases in the Bible, "son of" is used to refer to descendants rather than literal sons. Thus, Jesus could be called a "son of David". But because of ...


10

You are confusing titles with proper names. Yesh'ua (Heb.) is rendered "Jesus" or "Joshua" today. It is his given name. It means "Jehovah Saves." Christos (Greek) is a title translating the Hebrew "Messiah" or "Annointed One." It highlights his annointed and special status. Immanuel (Heb.) is a simple Hebrew construction that says "God is with us." It is ...


10

The proper way to refer to him is "Jesus, the Christ," since the Greek text states, «Ἰησοῦς ὁ Χριστός». Note the definite article ὁ which precedes Χριστός ("Christ"). However, to be even more accurate, it would actually be proper to say, "Jesus, the anointed one" or "the anointed one, Jesus" (for the Greek «ὁ Χριστός Ἰησοῦς»), since the actual English ...


9

For the Catholic Church and other Nicene churches (the Eastern Orthodox, the Oriental Orthodox, the Armenian Orthodox, the Assyrians; as well as the majority of Protestants), the divine name YHWH (which is closely linked to the expression “I am” or “I Am Who I Am” (see Ex. 3:14), applies to God in His divine nature—hence to all three Persons of the Trinity. ...


7

The Hebrew letters roughly corresponding to YHWH are the name of the Jewish god. Literally, this is their god's name, just like my name is Kyralessa and your name is Rachel. However, in order to avoid using God's name in vain, the Jews did not pronounce this name. Instead, they substituted the Hebrew word adonai, which means "lord". In the actual Hebrew ...


7

You are close: 'El Shama is what you are looking for. Shama means "to hear" (Strong's) and is found in Psalm 17:6, as you mention. Furthermore, the name Ishmael is derived from these two words: And the angel of the Lord said to her, “Behold, you are pregnant and shall bear a son. You shall call his name Ishmael, because the Lord has listened to your ...


6

Sources: Moshe ben Maimon, Sefer ha-Mitzvot, §62 The 62nd prohibition is that we are forbidden to swear a shvu'at shav (a vain oath). The source of this commandment is God's statement (Exo. 20:7), "Do not take the name of YHVH your God in vain." המצווה הס"ב האזהרה שהזהרנו על שבועת שוא והוא אמרו יתעלה : " לא תשא את שם ה ' אלהיך לשוא." (שמות כ, ז)...


6

I think a large part of His reason for doing this is to make shed more light on His identity. The title used reflects additional information about the person using it. So, to look at a few of Jesus's many titles: "son of man" -> associates Jesus with the glorious figure seen in Daniel 7 "son of David" -> associates Jesus with the promise God made to ...


6

The saying "I am the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the End" can be, and has been, interpreted in the following four ways at least: (1) As an idiom meaning eternal. Thus Albert Barnes interprets it in Barnes' Notes. Adam Clarke follows the same interpretation in his commentary on Revelation 1:8 where he says: I am Alpha and Omega - I am from ...


6

It may be helpful first to understand exactly what is mean by the word "vain." The NOAD defines vain as "producing no result, useless" and "having no meaning or likelihood of fulfillment." The use of God's name is usually reserved for prayer. Calling upon God is meant to have some kind of effect, but only if the caller is penitent and sincere. If the use ...


6

To definitively answer this question, one would need to know the Bible verses being compared... "Jehovah God" almost certainly refers to יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהִ֖ים "YHWH elohim". It is combination of the proper name of God (YHWH, known as the Tetragramaton; rendered in English as Yahweh or Jehovah, but the vocalization is uncertain - see below) and the generic ...


6

Short answer There is not a single passage in the New Testment that even encourages phisical violence against others. Long answer Yes, at the Old Testment you have some instructions that involves death penalty, for example, for murder (Exodus 21:12), kidnapping (Exodus 21:16), bestiality (Exodus 22:19), adultery (Leviticus 20:10), homosexuality (...


5

It is also known as the "Messianic Secret," that Jesus was not ready to fully disclose His identity until later on in His mministry. Ben witherington III (a well known conservative NT scholar) holds that if Jesus were to let on too early who He was He would have been crucified before being able to get done whatever preaching and teaching and miracles He ...


5

From the Catholic Encyclopedia: There has been a theological controversy over the question as to whether baptism in the name of Christ only was ever held valid. Certain texts in the New Testament have given rise to this difficulty. Thus St. Paul (Acts 19) commands some disciples at Ephesus to be baptized in Christ's name: "They were baptized in ...


5

Best bet is to read the introductory notes in your particular Bible. The translators will usually put info in those notes about special features used in the English texts to denote certain things in the original language. For example, my NASB has this note under Principles of Translation, The Proper Name of God in the Old Testament: One of the titles ...


5

Jehovah is an English rendition of the proper name of God from the Hebrew Bible, also rendered "Yahweh" or YHWH, which means I AM and is referred to as "The Tetragrammaton". It isn't specific to Jehovah's Witnesses, and can be found in many older English translations of the Bible. In the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) the doctrine of the Trinity isn't really ...


5

The Nicene Creed (Wikipedia: "It forms the mainstream definition of Christianity for most Christians.") answers this question (emphasis added): And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of his Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with ...


5

Jesus was hailed as the Messiah - the "Anointed One" (in Greek 'Christos' from which we get Christ). The Messiah was thought to be the one who would restore the kingdom of Israel. (Which, of course, Christians believe he did in the heavenly sense, but not the earthly sense.) You anoint a King, of course, which is where the confusion begins. Indeed, the "...


5

To be clear, Christians do use other names of God in some contexts. Michael Card's song El Shaddai was wildly popular in the 80's, and is often credited with launching the career of Amy Grant. I remember singing Jehovah Jireh, and dozens of other songs like that. Kay Arthur has a popular study based on the names of God, directed especially at women. That ...


5

1.The Jewish and Islamic concept of God is the same: one God, one person, one mind.This is same in Talmud, a central text of Rabbinic Judaism written between 200 CE/AD- 500 CE/AD.Thus it is different from the Triune God of Trinitarian Christianity, God as three persons, three minds, co-equal and co-eternal, one in essence, nature, power, action, and will. ...



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