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19

Christians, in general, do not believe that Jesus' name is 'magic', in the sense that if you say the word your prayer is somehow more effective. The exact version of the name used is not therefore important. "In my name", as Jesus says, can mean a number of things including "with my authority" and "in accordance with my wishes". It's true that Yeshua is ...


16

It was a mispronunciation of a European (i.e. German/Old English) spelling of Jesus. Before the 1600s "Js" were pronounced "Y" - as in the name Jürgen. In fact, the letter "J" is extant in no alphabet until the 14th Century. The Greek Ίησους (Yeh-sus) was written "Jesus", but pronounced the same (that is, with a "Y") until after the 1630s when the letter J ...


15

Yes, it is actually a common name in many languages. It isn't so popular on English but* I know lots of people in the Spanish, Turkish and Arabic worlds that use various renditions of the name "Jesus". I am sure it is used in many other languages as well. Personally I would never name my kid that but there is nothing to stop anybody from doing so. *Several ...


13

Remember that the Hebrew Name "Yeshua" is exact English equivalent of "Joshua." According to the United States Social Security Administration, this was, in 2010, the 11th most popular boy's name - very, very popular, although its still a drop from when it was #3 from 2002 to 2006. Per the same source, 'Jesus' (which is a fairly common name amongst ...


12

This can be answered by answering a more general question: what does "in someone's (anyone's) name" mean? It means to act by proxy, on the authority of something or someone greater than yourself. It's a concept that our culture has kind of lost, though it still exists as a storytelling trope. When a medieval herald reads a proclamation "in the name of the ...


11

Surnames didn't exist in Jesus' day. People typically referred to somebody by referring to their parentage. So Jesus would have most likely been referred to as "Jesus son of Joseph" or "Jesus son of Mary", much in the same way as Peter was referred to as "Simon, son of Jonah" in Matthew 16:17 and "James son of Zebedee" in Mark 3:17. While nobody is ...


9

From this article, The reason they were baptizing "in the name of Jesus" is not because it was a formula, but because the phrase, "in the name of" means "in the authority of. They were baptizing with his authority. They were using his authority to baptize believers into a new life. Another quote from that same site: Therefore, when someone is ...


9

Your premise that other names are said the same across languages is simply not correct. Lots of writing systems and spoken sounds don't have one-to-one equivalents in other languages, and over time it is quite common for names to morph to things that are easier to write or say. Sometimes the name will be spelled the same but pronounced locally, then somebody ...


8

It's not an issue of interpretation, just the representation of the same name in different scripts. You point out correctly that Jesus' name (in Hebrew/Aramaic) was Yeshua. This is the same name of Moses' successor, "Joshua." The difference is that the name "Joshua" (coming from the Hebrew Bible) is a direct transliteration from Hebrew to English (as was ...


7

Jesus had no last name. Christ is a title that was given to Him. As noted in other questions, "Christ" comes from the Greek word "Christos", which is the translation of the Hebrew word "Meshiach", from which we derive the word "Messiah". So, "Messiah" and "Christ" are transliterated words for the same thing. These words mean "anointed one" in their ...


7

1 Cor. 15:22, 45 22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ all shall be made alive. . . . 45 And so it is written, "The first man Adam became a living being." The last Adam became a life-giving spirit. The specific reference is to obedience; The first Adam was the father of all men through the Flesh and disobeyed, and through him all of his ...


6

Most Churches will likely follow the words given by Jesus in Matt 28:19 than the Acts of the Apostles, and therefore "...baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit". Special mention should be given to the Apostolic Church, Apostolic traditions etc. who are more likely to baptise, as you say, in the name of Jesus. For some ...


6

I think a large part of His reason for doing this is to make shed more light on His identity. The title used reflects additional information about the person using it. So, to look at a few of Jesus's many titles: "son of man" -> associates Jesus with the glorious figure seen in Daniel 7 "son of David" -> associates Jesus with the promise God made to ...


6

What does it mean to pray "in Jesus' name"? Is it a magical formula that guarantees that your prayer will be heard? For example: Dear God, please give me a new bike and a chocolate cake and a magical telephone and an elephant. Also, please kill all the bad people. In Jesus' name, Amen. Does that prayer make more sense because it has "In Jesus' name" at ...


5

It is also known as the "Messianic Secret," that Jesus was not ready to fully disclose His identity until later on in His mministry. Ben witherington III (a well known conservative NT scholar) holds that if Jesus were to let on too early who He was He would have been crucified before being able to get done whatever preaching and teaching and miracles He ...


5

Well, to be accurate, are you asking about the Greek name Ἰησοῦς (English transliteration: Iēsous), or the actual Anglicized (English) name, "Jesus"? Or, are you referring to his likely Hebrew/ Aramaic name, יֵשׁוּעַ (English transliteration: Yeshu'a)? I suspect you're probably talking about his Hebrew/ Aramaic name since that was what he would have been ...


5

God does answer every prayer, but the answer may be “No, I don’t think so.” Mgr Robert Mercer said as much in a sermon (at the funeral of a priest who, gravely ill, died a few days after ordination): It goes without saying that we are disappointed that God gave no miracle of healing. Jenny and Philip went to Walsingham. They prayed. We all prayed. ...


3

There are certainly many names and titles by which the Messiah is called. As well as "Emmanuel", Isaiah has in 9:6 (ESV): For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Aquinas says ...


3

In Brazil I know some Jesus but I'm like Caleb at that point and would never name my kid Jesus I think that calling someone Jesus looks serious. Imagine a friend of someone called Jesus and someone cursing him because he was late or something, that looks bad. But according to Psalm 33:14-15 where it reads: “From the place of His dwelling, He looks on all ...


3

There are plenty of people named יְהוֹשׁוּעַ (English transliteration: Yehoshu'a) and יֵשׁוּעַ (English transliteration: Yeshu'a) in the Talmud, both Babylonian and Jerusalem. Each of these would be the equivalent to the Greek Ἰησοῦς (English transliteration: Iēsous) and English "Jesus." Although not all those mentioned in the Talmud lived after Jesus the ...


3

There are a few places where Jesus and Adam are mentioned together. Two note-worthy passages are in 1 Corinthians and Romans: 1 Corinthians 15:22 (NIV) For as in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive. Romans 5:12-21 (NIV) 12 Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came ...


2

Taken from Acts 19 : 2 He said unto them, Have ye received the Holy Ghost since ye believed? And they said unto him, We have not so much as heard whether there be any Holy Ghost. 3 And he said unto them, Unto what then were ye baptized? And they said, Unto John's baptism. 4 Then said Paul, John verily baptized with the baptism of repentance, ...


2

To add just one more thought to the answers already posted. Jesus didn’t seem to be about the business of glorifying himself. Not only in the verses quoted here, but throughout the New Testament, when Jesus spoke about himself it appears that he was deliberately taking the focus away from himself and directing the listener’s attention back toward God, the ...


2

I agree with Caleb, just to elaborate a little: Languages don't always have the same sounds. When people who grew up with one language try to learn another, they often have problems with sounds that are used in the new language but not in their native language. For example, Chinese people trying to learn English often say "r" rather than "l", hence all the ...


2

I would say it does not necessarily matter unless you choose to believe so, because belief has important bearing from a personal aspect, but no further. The point is, a name, though important, refers to a person, so it is more important that we are referring to the person (authority, character, power, wisdom, etc) of Jesus, than on how someone pronounces ...


2

You are overlooking several very important points in your question. Jesus was telling this to his disciples, who he knew were going to establish his Church, and it can be said that he was telling them that he would provide all they needed for that purpose. It also is true for us today, but you have to remember that that promise was primarily made in ...


1

I'm not sure you can give evidence from the Gospels regarding the pronunciation of Jesus. That's a linguistical thing. It's like trying to explain sound to a deaf person. Unless the original Gospels were audio-books, we have to make our best guess linguistically today. That being said, the Greek for Jesus, which is used in the Bible is Ἰησοῦς. The ...


1

Yeshoua is translated as Jesus as well as Joshua in the Old Testament, even in modern texts, ala the Book of Wisdom by Jesus Ben Sirach. In the Greek text, the author is called "Jesus the son of Sirach of Jerusalem." (50.27) "Jesus" is the Anglicized form of the Greek name Ἰησοῦς, the equivalent of the Aramaic Yeshua, derived from the older Masoretic ...


1

Barabbas' name was Jesus. Many people don't know it because the people who translated the scriptures into English left the original meaning out because of the conflict of interest. When Jesus was before Pilot and Pontius Pilate gave the option to release Jesus (the Christ) or Jesus bar-Abbas (translated son of the father). The later was a rebel leader ...


1

Its surprising that no one said that if you really wanted to render the name accurately in English, you should write Joshua, as that is a more accurate rendition than Jesus. But well, the question is closed and I am too late.



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