Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

I don't think the Bible makes any mention of musical style. What it does say is to "Make a joyful noise unto the lord" (KJV), Psalm 100. Modern music of course is usually accompanied by words, and the Bible of course does have much to say about words. "Let no unwholesome talk come out of your mouth" Ephesians 4:29, which could apply any popular music.


18

Given the premise that "All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness" ([2 Tim 3:16][1]), and recognizing that the scripture to which Paul refers is the Hebrew scripture (since the NT had not yet be formulated), it is be reasonable to examine what pleased God in worship in the Old Testament. ...


14

I'm familiar with a couple different schools of thought on this. Doubtless there are others as well. The first comes from Greek Orthodox tradition. I can't really speak to it directly, but a quick google search turned up a result indicating that it might have more to do with history and wanting to separate themselves from pagan worship. But there's ...


13

Might this be your quote? "The organ in the worship is the insignia of Baal" (Martin Luther, Mcclintock & Strong's Encyclopedia Volume VI, page 762) This phrase turns up 1,400 results in Google; but it may not be accurate. One researcher, apparently familiar with Luther and this quote, had this rebuttal: Strong DOES NOT use the word ...


8

This website gives a general idea about what some of the Churches of Christ teach about music in worship. As a result of the distinctive plea of the church - a return to New Testament Faith and practice - acappella singing is the only music used in the worship. This singing, unaccompanied by mechanical instruments of music, conforms to the music ...


7

Pope Pius X issued a motu proprio in 1903, Tra le Sollecitudini: 15. Although the music proper to the Church is purely vocal music, music with the accompaniment of the organ is also permitted. In some special cases, within due limits and with proper safeguards, other instruments may be allowed, but never without the special permission of the Ordinary, ...


7

After reading several of the comments, it appears that many are taking the original question, "Is rock music sinful / immoral" and rewriting it in their heads as "If I listen to rock music, does that make me a rank sinner?" As Paul put it... I Corinthians 6:11-13 And such were some of you: but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified ...


7

During the St. Gregory I papacy (590–604) this form of music was collected and codified, and was (and still is) strictly linked to the liturgy. In this sense, this is not just a style of music, but it goes together with the Mass and the prayer of "The canonical hours", consisting of eight prayer services: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, ...


7

I contacted the Valdensian Seminary in Rome and got this reply, from Lothar Vogel, professor of Church History: Dear Mr. Gunther, I thank you very much for your kind request and for your interest in Waldensian history. I can tell you that there are no sources concerning medieval Waldensian hymns or liturgies linked to Eucharistiv ...


6

It's very ancient! Song has been used in worship since before the Psalms were written, and certainly continued into New Testament times. And through Christian history to the present. See Psalm 81 (among lots of other references): 81:1Sing aloud to God our strength; shout for joy to the God of Jacob! 2 Raise a song, sound the timbrel, the sweet ...


6

The acoustic (non-electric) guitar is an instrument with a very soft dynamic range relative to most other instruments, such as the organ, or wind instruments, and is not effective in leading large assemblies in worship. The electric guitar was invented in 1931, but the electric signal from the guitar required amplifiers to increase the volume of the sound, s ...


5

Much like the definition on this site, the definition of a "Christian" artist tends to be "any group that claims itself as such." Much of the rise of Western Music can be attributed to the harmonization of the mass and other sacred music - Bach would sign his work "S.D.G," sola Dei gloria - for God's glory alone - but he is rarely considered a "Christian ...


5

Music is a critical part of a praise service, but it is not always appropriate for other services, such as vigils. The role of music in the bible is widespread, and there's no right or wrong way to use it. Whether you listen to the music, sing along, or ignore it. A very common use of music is to take the worshipper on a journey. At the beginning of the ...


5

As I've read in several books on worship (see below), the basis for this belief goes back to the roots of various kinds of music in African tribal music. The reasoning goes that since the tribal music was demonic (by intention), therefore its successors must have a demonic back-beat. However, I once read a senior thesis by a student at New St. Andrews ...


4

Short answer: ask the pastor and/or worship leader in your local church. Long answer: The Evangelical Free Church is an association of churches, which is less binding than a true denomination. As such, each individual church has a great deal of autonomy in the everyday workings of the local church. My brother and my father are both pastors at EFCA ...


4

Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty (2 Corinthians 3:17); therefore it is not God's intention that you are obligated to do something with which you are uncomfortable, but feel free to worship God via a different expression. For example, David danced before the Lord (2 Samuel 6:14). For singing in church: Jesus sang with the disciples in Mark ...


4

Paul's Greek was ψαλμοις, υμνοις and ωδαις πνευματικαις. Thayer's Greek Lexicon (via Blue Letter Bible) has ύμνος, -ου, ο, in Greek writing from Homer down, a song in praise of gods, heroes, conquerors, [cf. Trench as below, p297], but in the Scriptures of God; a sacred song, hymn. Thayer quotes Richard Chevinix Trench's Synonyms of the New ...


3

The accepted answer is an excellent response, however, the only biblical basis for prohibition of instruments is the "silence of the scriptures" argument. The argument states that if the Bible is absolutely silent on a given action, then that action is prohibited. Note that for many who use the argument, any concept of "permissive silence" is not silence ...


3

I have just had someone from a church of Christ claim instruments are not mentioned in the new testament but they are someone missed trumpets and stringed instruments in Revelation.


3

Though not exactly related, there is a biblical tradition of incorporating music into corporate worship: Exodus 15:1 1 Then Moses and the Israelites sang this song to the LORD: “I will sing to the LORD, for he is highly exalted. Both horse and driver he has hurled into the sea. If we read the context, we see that this is the Song of ...


3

Perhaps some early Christians sang choruses at the beginning of worship, but this was not a standard part of the order of worship. New Testament From the beginning, worship was centered around the Eucharist. The New Testament does not contain an order of worship, but Paul mentions worship practices in a few of his letters. He talks about worship songs in ...


3

By "Guitar led worship", I think you mean to say a worship band that uses acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass guitar, drum-set and keyboard, commonly known as Contemporary worship music. This kind of worship style is very recent and growing, though still facing oppositions from many traditional churches. It's more popular among Charismatic churches. ...


2

There are a number of times that the Psalms have a call and response to them (there is one which has "for his love endures forever" as the second half of every verse). The liturgy which is shown in the book of Revelation has a clear chorus which is separate from the congregation (elders who bow down are separate from the great multitude). If it is possible ...


2

I can't speak for countries out side of the U. S., but here in the States any type of musical instrument is permitted as long as: A. They are approved by the right authority. B. They are played in a manner that is edifying. Sacrosanctum Concilium 120: "The use of other instruments may also be admitted in divine worship, given the decision and ...


2

This question has already been answered before. You just have to read the Catholic Encyclopedia. Below, I have extracted out and rearranged parts from the encyclopedic entry in order to provide a concise answer for this question. I've also dug into some material that explains the reason for singing the Psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles (Col 3:16): the ...


2

Though I'm not from EFCA, I can suggest few things. Attend that local church for sometime, at least a month. Try to know who are the leaders. Try to talk with the members from the music team, try to have a connection with them. If you can make friendship with at least one of them, that's the easiest way to introduce yourself. If you are bold enough, talk ...


1

Contemporary worship and worship leader or pastor ( formerly choir directors and such ) is inextricably linked to the Charismatic Movement of the 1960’s and 70’s. Several important aspects of this theology of congregational song are worth highlighting. This influence is largely of John Wimber and the Vineyard movement of the late 1970’s and 1980’s. Saying ...


1

I listened to a lot of this type of music as a kid. These kids musical albums, featuring kids singing the songs and some sort of story that runs in between the songs, were very popular in the 80s. Churches and Christian schools often performed these as stage productions with kids. Some of the more notable producers of these Christian kids musicals ...


1

//Does the Catholic Church allow latest musical instruments(guitars, drum set, piano etc.) to be played while worshiping in the church?// No. Modern musical instruments are not allowed unless permitted by the local bishop. Guitars and Drums are explicitly forbidden for Liturgical use. I am not a musical student so I don't know the difference between a ...


1

From the Reformed Presbyterian perspective, I would say that the basis for all public worship (i.e., worship with the Lord's people on the Sabbath) is found in the Regulative Principle of Public Worship: all elements of pblic worship must have an express warrant in Scripture. Put another way, you can only do those things in public worship that God has ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible