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24

Like the forefathers of those who eventually ended up in the Promised Land, Moses's problem was that he failed to trust in God. In chapter 12 of Numbers, Aaron and Miriam oppose Moses as God's messenger and their leader. As a result, they also are refused entry to the land (by death, like Moses). Moses' problem wasn't that he misinterpreted God or thought ...


24

Answers in Genesis, an Apologetics site dedicated to defending the Bible as inerrant, gives five "reasonable" possibilities: Bear in mind that the real answer is, "we don't know for sure", and we can't answer what did happen. The best we can do is offer plausible explanations of what might have happened. Typically this is done using common rules behind ...


17

Of course this is more of a historical-archeological question as the Bible does not directly answer but I have stumbled across a fairly convincing argument that would place Thutmose II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Exodus. I first came across the argument in Alfred Edersheim’s Bible History. He typically pays attention to ancient monuments and secular ...


15

The answer is right there in verse 12: And the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “Because you did not believe in me, to uphold me as holy in the eyes of the people of Israel, therefore you shall not bring this assembly into the land that I have given them.” It's a classic example of lack of faith. God tells Moses to do something that doesn't sound ...


15

They seem to be of the magicians that worked against Moses in Egypt: They also appear in Pliny the Elder's Natural History, together with Moses, as famous magicians of antiquity; Pliny's citation is also referred to in Apuleius. Numerius, a Pythagorean philosopher, calls them sacred Egyptian scribes. This has been taken from Wikipedia, and I don't know ...


15

Moses wrote many things that foreshadowed the coming of the Messiah. Jesus is, indeed, the Passover Lamb, as those who put their faith in His death and the blood He shed are rescued from the judgment that is to come. (John 3:16-18) Like the manna in the desert, Jesus is the Bread from Heaven (John 6:51) that satisfies our spiritual hunger and gives us ...


14

I can't speak for God, but here's an answer from a Conservative Baptist point of view. Why does Moses who is a mere mortal have compassion for the people of Israel while God, who is of infinite goodness lacks it? The question assumes that compassion = goodness, and that God's goodness would prevent Him from executing judgment. I believe that this ...


12

This issue will be debated for a long time. However, Henry H. Halley addresses this issue with great clarity. In his book, Halley's Bible Handbook, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 113, "There are two leading opinions: Amenhotep II (1450-1420 B.C.), or Merneptah (1250-1220 B.C.). Merneptah was the son of Rameses II, who was a master ...


10

It's not so much that sandals or slippers are considered to be unholy, it's that they're dirty, and removing them is a sign of respect similar to removing one's hat when entering a building, or perhaps removing a nose ring when entering a strict parent's house. From the United church of God's article on the subject: Taking off your sandals was like the ...


9

Maybe, maybe not. Consider Job 9:6. Job 9:6 (DRA) 6 Who shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble.     Job is supposed to have lived around the time of Abraham, quite a while before the events that took place in numbers. Even if you consider Job to be a tall tale, its origin in oral tradition might ...


9

This question presumes that the devil only exists in hell, which is clearly a false presumption. If we look at Jesus' temptation in the wilderness (in Matthew 4:1-11), we see that Satan exists here on earth as well: Matthew 4:1-3 (NIV) Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. After fasting forty days and forty ...


8

The section you quote contains the answer: because Moses did not believe. He was told to "tell the rock... to yield its water" but instead he struck the rock twice, apparently believing God's command to be insufficient. He expected God to act in exactly the same way as He had before*, but God apparently wanted to reveal His power to Moses in a new way. As ...


8

As soon as I posted this question, my mind went to the famous story of Jacob's ladder, in Genesis 28:10-22. Two verses in particular stick out for me: He had a dream in which he saw a stairway resting on the earth, with its top reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. Verse 12. This is because Jesus is our bridge ...


8

When the Lord finished speaking to Moses on Mount Sinai, he gave him the two tablets of the covenant law, the tablets of stone inscribed by the finger of God. (Exodus 31:18, NIV) According to Keil there was only 172 words (the decalogue) in Exodus 20:2–17 that were written on the stones by the 'finger of God'. This would have easily fit. Nothing is ...


8

It doesn't and he didn't. It does say he killed A man. And murder is murder whether you kill one or a thousand, so he was a murderer. Exodus 2:12 (ESV) 12  He looked this way and that, and seeing no one, he struck down the Egyptian and hid him in the sand. In my experience, the accusation of 'mass-murder' usually stems from a gross ...


7

The hypothesis was formed from several lines of evidence suggesting that more than one author had a hand in writing the Torah. Stage 1 The first stage was the recognition of certain passages that looked like additions from a later copyist: Deuteronomy 34, the account of Moses' death, including the phrase in verse 6, "no one knows his burial place to this ...


7

John 5:39 You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that testify about me... A common refrain in sermons (and I've used this myself!) on the Transfiguration is that Jesus is being shown to be "the Word." Historically, Jesus referred to the Scripture as "the Law and the ...


6

Fire is symbolic of: God's glory A source of illumination An indication of power A source of cleansing (the environment was made holy) A source of warmth and comfort in cold and dark places God's wrath against uncleanliness That the bush was not consumed is a sign that: That the fire was not sustained by the bush. God's existence doesn't depend on ...


6

There is a concept found throughout the Old Testament that God is a consuming fire: Deuteronomy 4:24 (NIV) For the LORD your God is a consuming fire, a jealous God. The idea behind this consuming fire is that it is the fire of God's judgment. Just before that verse in Deuteronomy, it says not to make idols (starting in verse 24) because the God is a ...


6

One example is: Deuteronomy 32:43 (NIV) 43 Rejoice, you nations, with his people,    for he will avenge the blood of his servants; he will take vengeance on his enemies    and make atonement for his land and people. Which we know from Hebrews 1:6 is referring to Christ. However, I suspect that Jesus was referring ...


6

The short answer is: No one knows. You might think it would be a simple matter of saying, "The Exodus occurred in such-and-such a year, look up who was Pharoah in that year, problem solved." But in practice scholars debate just when the various Pharoahs ruled, and they debate even more when the Exodus happenned. I've seen theories that range from Pepi II, ...


6

Most commentators follow a common Jewish understanding that the Jewish leaders immediately relayed his words to their clans or households. Unto all Israel. It cannot be supposed that Moses spoke to the whole multitude of the people so as to be heard by them. Hence the Jewish interpreters say that he spoke to the elders of the people, who carried his ...


6

Scripture tells us Moses was 40 when the Egyptian struck the slave: Acts 7:22-29 22 And Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and was mighty in words and in deeds. 23 And when he was full forty years old, it came into his heart to visit his brethren the children of Israel. And then...in Acts 7:30 And when forty years were expired, ...


5

It is not that earthquakes themselves were new, but rather that an earthquake would have been directly caused by God to punish Korah in front of everyone that would have been new. Numbers 16:28 - 29 sets this up: Then Moses said, “This is how you will know that the LORD has sent me to do all these things and that it was not my idea: If these men die a ...


5

Christ is the main subject in the Old Testament "concealed". God speaks of Him in types and shadows. At Rephidim (Exodus 17:4) God told Moses to strike the Rock.The Rock is Christ (1st Corinthians 10:4), Moses represents the Law. Jesus was struck by Israel for presuming to violate the Law, for claiming to be God, which He is! When He was struck "crucified", ...


5

I would like to off up also that Moses was acting as an intermediary between God and Israel. This foreshadows the work of Christ and, in my reading, is why Moses is always "sticking up for" the people by interceding with God and God only shows his justice before relenting to Moses pleas.


5

This is only partially answered Scripturally. Genesis 25:1-2 (KJV) 25 Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name was Keturah. 2 And she bare him Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah. The significance of this passage is that the Midianites were descendants of Abraham, and as such would have shared the knowledge ...


5

According to most Christian traditions, God cannot change His mind. There are those that teach that He can change His mind, a position inherent in Open Theism. However, this is seen as a heresy by most orthodox Christian traditions. It denies the omniscience of God. From http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/07/does_god_ever_change_his_mind.php ...


5

Pretty clearly, there has to be a mixture of revelation and tradition in Genesis. There are several time periods written about in Genesis, and these should be examined individually: Creation Clearly the only observer to the Creation was the Creator. (Or no-one if you are disinclined to believe in a Creator, but from a Christian perspective, no one other ...



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