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It's so simple yes of course they used to sacrifice way before any temple was even built just take Abraham for instance .


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Yes, these do appear to be inconsistencies, but only because we often think of the history of ancient Israel and Judah backwards. The broad consensus of scholars is that the Book of Deuteronomy – though set by its authors in an earlier era – was actually written after the period of the judges and the kings. Worshiping Yahweh in the many temples and 'high ...


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Yes guys, Thank you so much for your help! ...Warren, if we say this concept of "temporary, limited" worship, or "specific, not general" worship was permitted, I guess I'm still left wondering about why Elijah seems to lament that certain altars to the LORD were torn down. After all, they were never really supposed to be permanent anyway. Just temporary. And ...


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Many places in the Old Testament show the people of Israel either being directed by God, or of their own accord, building altars to Him that were not either in the tabernacle, or (much later) the temple. A sampling of passages: Deuteronomy 27:4ff, "So when you have crossed over the Jordan, you shall set up these stones, about which I am commanding you ...


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After King Solomon, The kingdom split in two due to varies disagreements and abuses started with Solomon and Continuing with his Son Rehoboam. As a result, 10 tribes split from the temple worship in Jerusalem and started the Northern Kingdom of Israel; the Southern Kingdom was called the Kingdom of Judah. Judah is where we get the word "Jew”. When ...


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Pay close attention to the words and what they are referring to here: 1 Samuel 1:1 There was a certain man of Ramathaim-zophim of the hill country of Ephraim whose name was Elkanah the son of Jeroham, son of Elihu, son of Tohu, son of Zuph, an Ephrathite. Samuel, and even his father, were not Ephrathites, for Ephrathites were generally Judahites. ...


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Marjin, the context wherein the word is used is directed to those who practiced the law and would have meant any part of all laws dispensed primarily (if not entirely) in the Mosaical writings. There are several Greek words used for "law" in the NT. That specific usage dictates the laws aforementioned. Unless a specific law or sets of laws are leading ...


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The Jews divided their bible up into three sections: the Law, the Prophets, and the Writings. The Law contained the books of Moses. The Prophets were the historical and prophetical books. The last of the three divisions are the rest of the books, the poetical books. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanakh So Jesus was referring to the books that were not ...


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Yes, there are some restrictions. Here is what I know the Bible says on the topic. Yes, the Bible lays out restrictions on food that make sense (e.g. for health reasons) in the Old Testament. This was definitely the law for Israel before Jesus came, and there is open debate on whether or not this still applies today to all Christians. In the law of ...



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