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27

There are many separate views to the matter. I'll try to list the most common ones, along with sources (at the end of each section). I'll first just describe the views briefly; the sources are available for those more interested. Catholic The Catholic Church teaches that the Law of Moses (the Old Law) is a preparation for the Gospel, and as such no longer ...


26

In Mark 3:1-6, Jesus heals a crippled man's hand on the sabbath: Jesus went into the synagogue again and noticed a man with a deformed hand. 2 Since it was the Sabbath, Jesus’ enemies watched him closely. If he healed the man’s hand, they planned to accuse him of working on the Sabbath. 3 Jesus said to the man with the deformed hand, “Come and stand ...


26

The typical reformed answer on this is that the Old Covenant is fulfilled in the the Death and Resurrection of Jesus and that we are now living under the New Covenant. Lets look at this specifically point by point. Leviticus 11:7-8 and Leviticus 11:11-12 have been fulfilled by by Acts 11:6-9 6I looked into it and saw four-footed animals of the earth, ...


22

It's easy to get tripped up trying to figure out what you should or shouldn't do, but I find the below very helpful in getting right to the heart of the matter and really the heart of God. Matthew 22:37-40 37 Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the first and greatest ...


19

Unlike Judaism, Christianity has no rule prohibiting (or commanding) the eating of pork. In fact, in Acts 10:9-16, Peter has a vision where a sheet is lowered from Heaven with "all sorts of animals, reptiles, and birds" on it. He is then commanded to get up, kill, and eat the animals. To this, Peter is shocked and replies that he has never eaten anything ...


18

Yes - but which of them is a matter of debate Since I already did a lot of work to answer To what extent does the Law of Moses still apply? I'm going to adapt that answer here, too. Similarly, I'll list and briefly describe some of the more common views along with sources. Catholic The Catholic Church teaches that the Law of Moses (the Old Law) is a ...


18

Yes, the Bible speaks strongly against the pagan practice of Astrology, which was recognized as divination and associated with magic and sorcery. Divination is defined as "the practice of attempting to foretell future events or discover hidden knowledge by occult or supernatural means", which would certainly include Astrology. A number of scriptures ...


17

It's unclear to me whether you're asking for an answer that relates to political or governmental policy, or how we ought to behave as individual Christians. But to address the latter, 1 Corinthians 5:12-13 I believe is relevant: 12 What business is it of mine to judge those outside the church? Are you not to judge those inside? 13 God will judge those ...


17

This was actually addressed pretty explicitly early on, and doesn't require all that much interpretation. In Acts chapter 15, the apostles and elders of the church held a council to determine the answer to this exact question. When they reached an answer, they claimed it had the sanction of the Holy Ghost, so their answer is to be understood as divine ...


16

Solomon married his concubines, so he wasn't practicing adultery - just polygamy, which was not forbidden. David murdered Uriah, but did it by proxy. He did not kill Uriah, rather he set up a situation in which he would fall in battle. Beyond that, yes David "killed his ten thousands," but did so in battle, and thus it isn't murder. And as Caleb pointed ...


16

Part of the confusion as modern readers is that we miss what the Pharisees meant when they referenced "the Law." For the Pharisees, "the Law" had two parts. There was the "Written Law" (תורה שבכתב), and there was the "Oral Law" (תורה שבעל פה), which they claimed was also given to Moses at Mt. Sinai. You can read more about this in the Mishnah. The Old ...


14

The commands God gave to Ancient Israel are normally divided into three kinds: moral, civil and ceremonial. This question and this question have more information. This one, and any of the others invoking the death penalty, certainly fall into the 'civil' category. The state of Israel (loosely speaking) would have the authority to impose the death penalty for ...


14

Quite simply, no, it's not fair to say that. I do not know Hebrews, but I do know that in Greek, the word anthropos indicates a generic man or person, while aner means specifically a person who is male. If we went through the entire Bible and applied an exclusive gender wherever it said "man", it would be nonsensical. Whoever sheds the blood of man, by ...


13

Yes, there was a special provision. God personally enacted a punishment. In the case of David, God caused his son to die and did not permit him to be the one to build the temple. 2 Samuel 12:14 (ESV) Nevertheless, because by this deed you have utterly scorned the Lord, the child who is born to you shall die. 1 Chronicles 28:3 (ESV) But God said ...


12

Like my answer here, you need to keep the chronology right. There is no levitical law at the time of Abraham. Thus, even if he did marry his sister, remember that he was breaking no covenantal restriction on doing so. As I said in that answer, you don't convict someone of a crime ex post facto.


12

There is much debate about this one but I think the Rabbis never understood it, which causes trouble to some Christian commentators as well. It reminds me of this: For it is written in the Law of Moses:“Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain.” Is it about oxen that God is concerned? (1 Corinthians 9:9, NIV) The Apostle applies this to ...


11

When you read the Old Testament and find restrictions like this one what you need to realize is that most of these types of restrictions are reactions to what the other inhabitants of the land were doing. God didn't want His people to copy the pagan rituals that were going on, and some of it is just preventing the spread of desease. So if you have a doubt, ...


11

What does it mean to "have to" obey God's laws? I "have to" show up to work, or I will lose my job. I "have to" grow old (I have no choice in the matter). The binding of God's laws to Christians falls into neither of these categories. It is neither the case the disobedience negates salvation nor that we are unable to sin. That said, the law is sometimes ...


11

Nope. There are no restrictions. We can even eat food sacrificed to idols. This passage in 1 Corinthians talks about that. The passage ends with the verse: 1 Corinthians 8:8 (NIV) But food does not bring us near to God; we are no worse if we do not eat, and no better if we do. Having said this, the author continues with: 1 Corinthians 8:9-10 ...


11

Some possibilities why Daniel refused the King's choice of food. Unclean animals: According to this source, pork was the choice meat of Babylonians. If this is true, it is certain that Daniel was ready to die by not eating nor touching the food. Leviticus 11:7-8 (NIV) And the pig, though it has a divided hoof, does not chew the cud; it is unclean for ...


10

Hebrews 10:1 (KJV) For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. I think you can say from Hebrews 10 that the Old Testament sacrifices were a picture of Christ's sacrifice more than that his death ...


10

No, there are no reasons that would make this a good idea. In the Old Testament we see an explicit prohibition on people inside God's chosen people marrying those outside of it on the grounds that it would cause them to turn away from serving their God. Deuteronomy 7:3-4 (ESV) 3  You shall not intermarry with them, giving your daughters to their ...


10

Having multiple wives was permitted (though not exactly endorsed) in the Law of Moses. Adultery is having (or desiring) an intimate relationship with someone who's already married (to someone else). As it was forbidden in the Mosaic law, it was referring to a man and someone else's wife. It was not really speaking of a married man and another woman. Even ...


9

Paul made the role of the Law of Moses clear in his epistle to the Galatians: 19 Wherefore then serveth the law? It was added because of transgressions, till the seed should come to whom the promise was made; and it was ordained by angels in the hand of a mediator. 20 Now a mediator is not a mediator of one, but God is one. 21 Is the law ...


9

Some Christians divide the Mosaic law into three components: Moral, Ceremonial, and Civil. Moral laws apply to all believers at all times: the Ten Commandments, the Shema, etc. Civil laws were for the governing of the nation of Israel. They may be valid today but the punishments listed with them might not apply to us. Ceremonial laws were for the worship ...


8

You can look at the Catechism of the Catholic Church for more information about equating the moral law with the Ten Commandments. For a nice summary of this section you can look at this: http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c3a1.htm#brief But, to break it up into some parts to help explain, you may want to look at the definition of a moral law: ...


8

To preserve the sanctity of life Genesis 9:6 Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man. The Lord commands that those who commit certain sins must die because they have despised those made in His own image. It's also worth noting that one of the reasons for the flood (where all but 8 were killed) ...


8

The letters of Paul tell us that the law was given to show us that we do not measure up. It is impossible to live a God pleasing life by works. So failing was an expected part of the laws. So things would exist that were humane, and God gave guidelines on how to go about all this. Even more, we live in a fallen world, and God gives us means to survive in a ...


8

Many Christians agree that there are three distinct kinds of laws in the old testament, and that one of them is eternal. The moral law that declares how man should live. The civil law that was the legal structures for the ancient nation of Israel. The ceremonial law that declared how ancient Israel was to worship. The moral law is believed to be ...


8

If anything, it says that God is both generous and accommodating. There are two scenarios that should be considered: God granted the same knowledge of what good governance should look like. This says that God's glory will in fact be shown in all nations, as he himself proclaimed. (Gen 12 and Psalm 2 come to mind, but there are others) If the other nations ...



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