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Logically, there are two possibilities: either Jesus himself said such things or they were added to the tradition at a later date. Neither view offers a clear-cut explanation, so a wide variety of ideas for the "secretive" passages have been offered by Christian commentators and Bible scholars over the years. Jesus did not tell anyone to remain quiet ...


8

The most commonsensical explanation of the Messianic Secret is simple self preservation - not necessarily self preservation in the literal sense, but in terms of the mission of Jesus. He couldn't do what he was trying to do if it became well known that he was the messiah. In the time in which Jesus lived, Palestine was under Roman occupation. Jesus was ...


4

The Messianic Secret refers to a motif primarily in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus is portrayed as commanding his followers to silence about his Messianic mission. The Messianic Secret belongs in Mark's Gospel, but elements of it have been copied into the later synoptic gospels (Matthew and Luke) but not into John, which takes a very contrary view of ...


4

The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the (Hebrew) Old Testament and was completed by 132 BC. As the Old Testament contains many references to an "anointed one" (transliterated to English as "Messiah"), the decision by the (Jewish) translators to translate this word to the Greek "Christos" would have been driven by the need to find the nearest equivalent ...


3

One of the reasons is plainly given in scripture in the context to an occurrence of keeping the messianic secret Mar 1:43-45 (NIV) Jesus sent him away at once with a strong warning: “See that you don’t tell this to anyone. But go, show yourself to the priest and offer the sacrifices that Moses commanded for your cleansing, as a testimony to them.” ...


3

When Christians say "Jesus died for our sins", what do they mean? This is a reference to 1 Corinthians 15:3: For I handed on to you as of first importance what I in turn had received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures. Different Christians understand "Christ died for our sins" in different ways; there have been ...


3

The title of "Messiah" doesn't imply any divinity for the individual bearing that title, so it should be considered as distinct from the title "son of God". Messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎; mashiach, "anointed [one]") is a term used in the Hebrew Bible to describe priests and kings, who were traditionally anointed with holy anointing oil as described in Exodus ...


2

It is important to note the nature of the prophecies themselves. The Old Testament gives very conflicting prophecies about the Messiah. To briefly look over them, here's an outline of a few of them: He was to be a rejected Messiah He was to be a betrayed Messiah He was to be a ruler of all nations He was to come in power 'on clouds' He was to come in ...


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The answer is simple. Jesus told him: Luk 24:27 And beginning at Moses and all the Prophets, He expounded to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself.


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The included commentaries include references to the following verses, among others (the citations in each have been preserved in this answer). Daniel 7:13-14 In my vision at night I looked, and there before me was one like a son of man,[a] coming with the clouds of heaven. He approached the Ancient of Days and was led into his presence. 1He was given ...


2

The English word "messiah" is a loanword derived from the Latin word messias, which itself is a transliteration of the Greek word μεσσίας (cp. John 1:41, 4:25), which itself is a transliteration of the Hebrew word מָשִׁיחַ, which is accurately transliterated into English as mashiach. That being said, the Hebrew word מָשִׁיחַ is an adjective which translates ...


1

It appears that the Church's typological approach to interpreting Messianic prophecy is grounded for the most part in the New Testament information that is later referenced to Old Testament passages. What is primarily considered to be 'Messianic' in nature is largely attributed to that which refers, in hindsight, to Christ, who is in fact the Messiah. The ...


1

Isaiah 44:6 “Thus says the Lord, the King of Israel, And his Redeemer, the Lord of hosts: ‘I am the First and I am the Last; Besides Me there is no God. Revelation 22:13 I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.” Jesus = THE first and last (true) Yahweh = THE first and last (true) Jesus = Yahweh (true) (two ...



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