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14

In the next verse Jesus tells of how he will have to suffer, die, and rise again. Matthew 16:21 NIV 21 From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised ...


12

Jesus was attempting to hide the fact that he was the Messiah. But, it's not because he was afraid of the local authority. Rather, he was trying to delay the events of his death. He knew that the timing had to be perfect and these events recorded in Matthew were "too soon". Part 1: The secret In John 7, Jesus' disciples are going up to the festival. ...


11

Jesus died for our sins What we (and the Bible) mean by the phrase "Jesus died for our sins" is that all sins have a penalty. We see the same thing in the justice systems of nations--for every crime, there is a penalty. When the penalty is paid, we say that justice has been served, and that's a good thing. Our sins are really rebellion against God, and ...


11

Although I presume this question will be closed, I'll answer anyway. A Christian who converts to any other religion, whether Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, etc., is considered a heretic and anathema. With respect to Muslims: while they confess Yeshu'a to be the Messiah (e.g., Sūratu Āli ʿImrān, āyah 45), they deny his 1) crucifixion, 2) atonement, 3) death, and ...


9

The notes in my Bible say: [11:3] The question probably expresses a doubt of the Baptist that Jesus is the one who is to come (cf. Mal 3:1) because his mission has not been one of fiery judgment as John had expected (Mt 3:2). So the timeline becomes: Jesus enters the scene. --> John proclaims that he is the Messiah. --> John Baptizes. --> John is ...


8

It does seem that the Jews hadn't understood that the Messiah would have to suffer, or that the suffering servant of Isaiah 53 was the Messiah. Apart from the verse you have quoted, there are other verses which suggest that the Jews didn't understand this. They understood that the Christ would be the "King of Israel" (Matthew 15:32), they knew that he ...


8

Old Testament prophecies are sometimes 'thematic', by 'type' or 'metaphor' as in the case of these three days. There are various places in the Old Testament that give special meaning to three days. The gospels however only refer to the prophecy of Jonah. Christ said that Jonah would be the 'sign' that God would give the Jews, as a rebuke for their ...


8

Not part of my definition of apocrypha, but reading Wisdom leaves you with a distinct feeling that that the messiah is coming and he's going to be very badly treated. I won't post all of Wisdom 2 here, but make sure if you read it, that you don't cut up the verses, these are bad people talking bad things about a righteous Man. For, not thinking ...


8

Christopher Wright authors the book Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament to help modern day Christians make a correlation between Old Testament Israel and the Messiah-ship of Jesus Christ. I think this is the best resource for the answer to this question and the full text can be found here Wright begins his book by making the assertion that the Jesus of ...


8

I think there is an assumption behind your question that is not quite right, regarding the Christian conception of "the Messiah". As David Stratton shows in his answer, the Messiah concept is originally Jewish, and Christians believe that Jesus is that very same Messiah, and the fulfilment of various prophecies. But bear in mind that most Christians ...


7

No, I do not believe so. A general theme in the Tanakh ("Old Testament") is the rebellion and faithlessness of the Israelites. This couldn't possibly be typical of the Messiah. However, the Messiah is indeed "Israel." Elsewhere in the Tanakh, the Messiah is referred to by the name "David," his ancestor (cp. Jer. 30:9; Eze. 37:24-25; Hos. 3:5). In the same ...


6

A messiah is a saviour or liberator of a people in the Abrahamic religions. From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Messiah Mes·si·ah [mi-sahy-uh] noun 1 the promised and expected deliverer of the Jewish people. 2 Jesus Christ, regarded by Christians as fulfilling this promise and expectation. John 4:25, 26. 3 ( usually lowercase ) ...


6

Yes. Daniel, who wrote during the Babylonian Empire prophesied that Messiah would come after four succesive Kingdoms. One which had already existed, the Babylonian, would be taken over by the Persian, then the Persian taken over by the Greek. The Greek then taken over by the Roman, then Messiah overthrowing the Roman. This is not just a Christian ...


6

Yes, there are several (Sirach and Enoch for example). In fact Jude quotes the book Enoch. Jude 1:14-15 14 And Enoch also, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of these, saying, Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of his saints, 15 To execute judgment upon all, and to convince all that are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds ...


6

Take this answer as a complement. As Waggers said, the word being used is רֹעִי (ro·'i) and it means shepherd. (This is in Isaiah 44:28) But the Jewish commentary sheds light on this issue, because Rashi comments that shepherd is used as a metaphor for king. On Isaiah 45:1, it is said that Cyrus is the anointed: This is what the LORD says to his ...


6

The original Hebrew word being used here is רֹעִי (ro·'i),[1][2], which does indeed translate as "shepherd" according to Strong's Concordance.[3][4]


6

Yes they were, in fact the problem was not that they were expecting something less than God in the flesh, the problem was they were not expecting a lowly appearance. They expected his return in glory and judgment when he establishes peace forever -- what we now understand will happen at his second coming. It was his humanity, not his divinity, that tripped ...


5

Yes and No There were some spiritually aware individuals among the Jews who were expecting the Messiah: Simeon and Anna. However, most Jews were almost certainly anticipating what Christians call the second coming: what is mentioned in Isaiah 2:1-4, The word that Isaiah the son of Amoz saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem. And it shall come to pass in ...


5

The problem was their understanding of the Messiah... they did not understand that the Messiah must come and die for the sins of the world, on a cross. They were expecting a political messiah that would rescue the people from the hands of the Romans and rule the newly established Kingdom of Israel on Earth. Even after Jesus has risen the Apostles still ...


5

The Jews did expect Messiah to suffer but not not at all in the way in which he did. His suffering was only supposed to be a temporary set back as a King waging war against the Gentiles. He was expected to arrive and war with Gog and Magog. During that war against the Gentiles, both He and Israel would suffer, only to gain victory over the entire Gentile ...


5

Abram to Abraham God had promised Abram that he would have a son and that it would be through his wife Sarai. Abram's name means "Exalted Father", which may have proven to be an embarrassment as he aged without children. This fits with God's promise, but he didn't receive that name from God but from his father. God gives him the name "Abraham", which ...


4

One short set of Bible verses that capture many answers to your question is here: But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through him! For if, while we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to him ...


4

Extra-biblical sources give us a better perspective on the matter. I just ran across this while researching something unrelated: It is now certain--and this is one of the most important revelations of the Dead Sea discoveries--that Judaism in the first century B.C. saw a whole theology of the suffering Messiah, of a Messiah who should be the redeemer of ...


4

What is the Christian definition of "the Messiah"? The answer to the question is elaborate. Why not simply read the New Testament? The answers to your question are there. Of course, we believe one can read the Tanakh and find the answers there, but there is greater understanding achieved when reading the New Testament because Yeshu'a revealed the ...


4

Surprisingly some ancient rabbis did actually draw the connection of the Messiah to the creation of the world. Under this classical Messianic text, a connection was made: There shall come forth a shoot from the stump of Jesse, and a branch from his roots shall bear fruit. And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the Spirit of wisdom and ...


4

In Trinitarian orthodoxy, יהוה (YHVH), commonly referred to as "the Tetragrammaton," is the name of God. The Father is God, and thus, the name of the Father is YHVH. The Son is God, and thus, the name of the Son is YHVH. The Holy Spirit is God, and thus, the name of the Holy Spirit is YHVH. As there is only one God, there is only one name יהוה shared by ...


4

The Hebrew form of the word does, in fact, literally mean "anointed one". It was used in reference to those that were ceremonially anointed for special purpose. David was anointed to be king. However, there is a distinct difference between an anointed one and the anointed one. The Old Testament predicted the coming of a specific anointed one in many ...


4

The verses of Jeremiah 31:31–34 appear in seven paragraphs in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, of which six (quoted below) are directly relevant. In all of these, Christ the Messiah is the bringer of the New Covenant, which is to be written on the hearts of his people. This is entirely Biblical. The writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews quotes the ...


4

In his book, Eternity in Their Hearts, Don Richardson details what he calls "A World Prepared for the Gospel", which is the title of the first section of the book. People of the Lost Book Chapter 2 is entitled "Peoples of the Lost Book", which details tribes that bemoan the fact that their ancestors had lost "the book" from God. Some of them looked ...



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