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10

While it's not always the most reliable source for knowledge, a quick trip to Wikipedia's article on Transcendental Meditation gets us a bit of well-referenced history on the whole Transcendental Meditation movement. Included in the article is this: In the 1950s, the Transcendental Meditation movement was presented as a religious organization. The ...


10

Please excuse me for a large answer, in my opinion this question is really hard to answer in several words. Althought there are many references to "meditation" in Bible, however, word "meditation" should be used very carefully here, to be not confused with meditation practice in eastern religions, such as Buddhism or Hinduism. We Christians should listen ...


9

Meditation is now used for a lot of non-religious contexts, such as meditation for relaxation. However, when referring specifically to Christians meditating, one tip I have received is this: First read a passage of Scripture, once through, to get the general view of what the piece of Scripture is saying. Second, read it through a second time, this time, ...


8

As broad as it may appear, here is how we can summarize it. Matthew 22:35-40 (NIV) One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: “Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and ...


6

There is no Biblical argument for any food or drink of any type to 'aid in spiritual connection with God' or in 'developing a deeper understanding of his Word'. However, as you already noticed, the Bible does oppose drinking too much alcohol. 9Do you not know that the wicked will not inherit the kingdom of God? ... nor drunkards nor slanderers nor ...


6

I am unaware of any protestant denominations that have a special focus on contemplative prayer, but I'm also unaware of any that outright ban it. In my experience it is practiced only by a minority of Protestants, and that they are spread throughout many denominations. Of course it is practiced only by a minority of Catholics too. A good place to start is ...


6

The actual question is : Are there any specific rules at all in any denomination of Christianity? I am Roman Catholic and can answer for my denomination. Rules about prayer, meditation, and devotion ... The laity are expected to attend Mass each Sunday and on other specified Holy Days of Obligation, and to faithfully pray and meditate the ...


6

I agree with Cryst's hints on meditating. However, the most important part of meditation and Biblical revelation is the role of the Holy Spirit. You cannot understand what God wants to tell you through His word without the help of the Holy Spirit. For this reason, the most important part of Christian meditation is to pray and ask the Holy Spirit to reveal ...


5

Should we, Christians meditate? Yes, We should meditate. Another word used is contemplation. Let us see if people meditated as per the Bible. Psalm 119:97 - "Oh, how I love your law! I meditate on it all day long. " about the Psalmist himself Genesis 24:63 - "He went out to the field one evening to meditate" about Issac Other references: Psalm ...


4

I think the confusion is that, for many, the idea of meditation is to clear or empty your mind in an effort to find peace or tranquility. Christian meditation is the opposite: filling your mind and focusing or concentrating on a specific subject. The bible uses the word "meditation" in three places in the New Testament (Luke 21, Philippians 4, and I ...


4

I don't think there is any council-wide declaration about this, but most of the clergy will advise against such practices. To see why, we need to look into the traditional orthodox spirituality (hesychasm). The Holy Fathers put a complete and definitive set of spiritual practices which include fasting, remembrance of death, remembrance of own sins, Jesus' ...


3

Perhaps it is because of this confusion that you describe that your title and body do not really seem to match. I will try to clear up this confusion and answer your underlying question. The question seems to be: "Why are Christians not more concerned with ritual and seem so divided on what they should do as Christians? Why are they so different from the ...


3

About meditation in general, I can recommend you Ascent to Mount Carmel by saint John of the Cross, a famous 16th century mystic. It's not an easy reading, but it's a good guidebook of Christian mysticism. Along with few things that are good to do, author warns against many dangers in spiritual life, which may seem marginal in the beginning but may lead you ...


2

If we were perfect, our every thought would have it's foundation in God. What I mean is, if you "dive deep" into your thoughts, or even try to "empty" yourself, God becomes everything. Not that I have ever been able to do that very well, but the deeper you go, the more you as a Christian will find God. So to answer your question, go for it, but your aim ...


2

While there is little debate that the ancient Hebrews had access to cannabis, whether it was used is something which is very much subject to debate. The LXX suggests that it was cannabis, while the most reliable Hebrew documents say calamus (which is an entirely separate species), other sources identify that Hebrew word with yet another plant from the ...


1

Yes, Eastern Orthodox Christianity is against doing Yoga, meditation and whatever else 'new age' practisisms. Those practisisms are NOT Orthodox. Please read this article. It talks about the incompatibility of Yoga And Orthodox Christianity. It is written by Father Charles Joiner of the Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Greenville, South Carolina. ...


1

As Christians, the material, buzz words, we come across while thinking about meditation will be: Transcendental Meditation Traditional Christian Meditation Modern Christian Meditation Biblical Meditation We are taught to pray, fast and meditate, but lack basic teaching on the last. It would be helpful to list out, then, a framework to guide us in our ...


1

You should ask yourself these questions... Is my reason for meditation for good or for ill? Do I meditate for God or for myself? Do I replace God with meditation? Does my meditation harm my body, mind, heart, or soul? Does my meditation hinder my relationship with God or does it promote it? Do I do "Christian" meditation or only transcendental meditation ...



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