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11

It is almost certain that this person is Matthew. In the parallel account of this narrative in the Gospel of Matthew, we see that Levi appears to be "renamed" Matthew. Matthew 9:9 (NIV) 9As Jesus went on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the tax collector’s booth. “Follow me,” he told him, and Matthew got up and followed him. It is ...


9

I think you've cross wired your history a little bit. The lower overall literacy rate at the time doesn't mean nobody was literate. It certainly doesn't follow that a hand picked set of men must be illiterate because a lower percentage of the population was educated. Not everybody was a fisherman, ond even those that were often had other backgrounds and ...


9

The names of the authors of the Gospels have been adapted into English from the Greek of the New Testament.1 However, Hebrew and/or Aramaic were likely the mother tongue(s) of three of the evangelists (Matthew, Mark, and John), and their names reflect this background. Luke's name is Greek. All of these are normal, common names, and there is no reason to ...


6

For many will come in my name, saying, "I am the Christ," and they will lead many astray. (Matt 24:5, ESV) In addition to the account of Jesus' words in Matthew, we have parallel accounts in both Luke (21:8) and Mark (13:6). These both lack "the Christ", and the meaning of the claim is therefore somewhat less certain. The Lukan passage has occasionally ...


6

The gospel now known as Matthew's Gospel was originally anonymous. According to Eusebius, writing in the fourth century, Papias attributed a gospel to Matthew early in the second century, but some scholars are uncertain whether the gospel of which Papias spoke was the same gospel as is now widely attributed to Matthew. As Matthew was a disciple of Jesus, ...


5

The authorship of the New Testament is a not universally agreed among Biblical scholars. Many would not agree that Matthew, Mark, Luke or John actually wrote the gospels that bear their name. However I'll assume you want a fairly traditional approach if you are teaching youth. There is one thing that is almost universally agreed among scholars and that is ...


5

With respect to the traditional attributions, here's the simple list: Matthew: None Mark: None Luke: Acts John: 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, and Revelation Modern scholarship, which typically rejects the traditionally attributed authors of these books, still generally attributes Luke and Acts to the same author. There is less agreement on the authorship of ...


4

It's more likely Matthew and Levi were different disciples than the same. A number of the disciples had other names like we do today, however, the Gospels refer to James the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18) as a different disciple from Matthew (Mark 3:18). The Bible also mentions a disciple : "Levi the son of Alphaeus" (Mark 2:14). It's more likely this James and ...


3

Jesus said to a Samaritan women: Our fathers worshipped in this mountain; and ye say, that in Jerusalem is the place where men ought to worship. Jesus saith unto her, Woman, believe me, the hour cometh, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father. Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is ...


3

Tradition says that the gospels now known as Matthew, Mark, Luke and John were actually written by the persons whose names the gospels now bear. Of these, Matthew is thought to have been a tax collector and therefore literate, Luke was a physician and therefore literate. We know too little reliable information about Mark to say if he was literate, while it ...


2

You may possibly misreading the Scriptures. As I read the whole of chapter 18, I come away with a much different impression. Did Jesus give the authority only to the Apostles? Matthew 18:16 and 17 KJV But if he will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established. 17 And if ...


2

I think KJV has a more accurate (and clearer) translation of this. 21 ¶ Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. 22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in ...


2

The best explanation I heard on this passage goes like this : "Depart from me all those who professed to be my followers, yet lived your lives as if I had never given you commands to live by". In other words, all those who never tried to be holy like Jesus. And, by the way, ALL sins are mortal unless they are forgiven by Jesus. And He can forgive EVERY sin.


2

An excellent few verses from the Book of Mormon 25 What, do ye suppose that mercy can rob justice? I say unto you, Nay; not one whit. If so, God would cease to be God. 26 And thus God bringeth about his great and eternal purposes, which were prepared from the foundation of the world. And thus cometh about the salvation and the redemption of men, and ...


2

This is a parable (an earthly representation of a Heavenly concept) not an actual event. Jesus told us many times that we cannot expect God to forgive us our sins unless we also forgive others for the wrongs they do to us. All scripture is quoted from the King James version. Matthew 6:12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. ...


2

The Apostle John tells us, [Jesus] came to His own, and those who were His own did not receive Him. But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, even to those who believe in His name (John 1:11-12 NASB Updated). These words summarize quite well the evolution, if you will, of Jesus' ministry to a world of lost people....


2

Both verses are valid, but some significant things changed between the Book of Matthew and Paul's letters. After all, the Paul was still Saul back then! While on Earth, Jesus delivered his message to the Jews, but after his death and resurrection, a new covenant was offered to all of humanity, both Jews and Gentiles alike. This singular event changed God'...


2

Looking down further into this passage, there does seem to be the sense that Jesus is talking about someone who claims to be the Messiah ("The Christ"). vv 23-24 refer to "false messiahs and false prophets", so this seems to square with the common interpretation that Jesus is referring to a person who claims to be the Messiah. I don't know of any groups ...


2

Evangelical Protestants are divided on this question and have been since the Protestant Reformation began nearly 500 years ago. Martin Luther taught that this was a reference “The Office of the Keys”. Luther’s interpretation may be helpful since Lutheranism makes up a healthy portion of contemporary “Evangelicals”. Those of a Baptist and Calvinist ...


1

According to Evangelicals, who now has the authority to bind and loose (per Matt. 18:18)? Matthew 18:18 Verily I say unto you, Whatsoever ye shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever ye shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. - KJV Matthew 18:18 `Verily I say to you, Whatever things ye may bind upon the earth shall ...



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