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17

There are two differences here: "from evil" (KJV) versus "from the evil one" (NIV) "for thine is the kingdom..." in the KJV but not the NIV. The first difference reflects an alternative translation choice for the Greek word "πονηροῦ". This might be in the masculine or the neuter gender - the word forms are the same. But there is a difference in meaning: ...


9

This scripture in Malachi 4:5-6 refers to John the Baptist, not Jesus. Luke 1:17 "And he [John the Baptist] will go on before the Lord, in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous–to make ready a people prepared for the Lord." Matthew 11:14 "And if you are ...


7

My response comes from this article about OT prophecy about Jesus from Nazareth. It basically states that there is no direct Old-Testament reference to Nazareth. The article postulates two explanations: 1) It was a reference that Jesus would be despised. He says 'prophets,' plural. It could be that Matthew was referring to several Old Testament ...


5

Whether a person hurts our feelings is a different matter than whether that person has sinned against us. For example, my doctor might tell me I am overweight. In that case, my doctor would be acting lovingly toward me. If my feelings are hurt, then I am the one with the hard heart in that example. Therefore my counsel is to be especially careful in ...


4

Well, in the preceding verses, they were questioning Jesus about his authority. Jesus answered by asking them about John the Baptist's authority, to draw an analogy. So the obvious answer would be that they didn't believe John's testimony of Jesus: John 1:19-34 19 And this is the record of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from ...


3

KJV version is rendered as: 16 Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. The original Greek word would be better translated as "guileless" (i.e. without deceit, or not lying to people). In other words speak truth but be careful of what you say because they will not like what ...


2

In order to answer your question it is necessary that we understand some things not so evident in Malachi itself. The Old testament is basically a synopsis of God's will in opposition to man's fragility and Satan's deviousness. The New Testament is on the other hand God's solution to the enigma. In the Old Testament man consistently demonstrates his ...


2

This is a parable (an earthly representation of a Heavenly concept) not an actual event. Jesus told us many times that we cannot expect God to forgive us our sins unless we also forgive others for the wrongs they do to us. All scripture is quoted from the King James version. Matthew 6:12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. ...


2

Jesus is making several points here. We will be helped in understanding these points by unpacking them one by one. Imagery: Wolves prey on sheep. They are fierce, and from a human perspective, pitiless. In observing a wolf attack a sheep, we quite naturally feel sorry for the innocent prey being devoured by the predator. Wolves "gang up" on their ...


2

The reason for the presence or absence of the brief doxology at the end of the Lord's Prayer is actually liturgical use. In Eastern-rite usage, the doxology is recited in the liturgy after the Lord's Prayer; this is probably how the phrase crept into Eastern Greek mediaeval manuscripts of the New Testament. These manuscripts are ultimately the ones on which ...


2

I think the question Jesus asked them was about the source of John's baptism. Was it from heaven (God-given) or simply by human authority (from men). Obviously, the Pharisees did not believe that John's baptism came from God and therefore they did not believe him when he said that they needed to repent and be baptized. They might have simply shown up for ...


1

You are basically asking why God allows people to sin, without taking their lives beforehand, or even allowing them to live at all. Or how about "Why does God create people that will end up in hell?", because it would be better for anyone to not be born than to turn from their creator. God created us and gave us free will, knowing we would turn to our ...


1

The root word for Nazareth and Nazirene are similar in both the hebrew and greek. The hebrew NeTseR is used as most likely a play on words in the Hebrew, which is read right to left (Resh-Tsade-Nun : Strong's H5342) means a "figurative descendent". It's direct translation is "Sprout, Shoot, Branch" which used in Isaiah 11:1-refering to Meshiach (Messiah), ...


1

Some think that Samson was a type of Messiah because he was a Nazarite (one consecrated to God - נָזִר nazir) for his entire life. Behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. So then drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb to the day of his death.’ (Judges 13:7, ESV) But this is not ...



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