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Why use a scared language in liturgical celebrations? The angelic doctor answers: The use of a sacred language in the liturgical celebration is part of what St. Thomas Aquinas in the Summa Theologiae calls the "solemnitas." The Angelic Doctor teaches: "What is found in the sacraments by human institution is not necessary to the validity of the ...


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Even though I am not Catholic, I teach the history of music, and thus, have become somewhat familiar with music practices in the early church. One point that struck me as a very valid one for the continued use of Latin is that it is a dead language. While that may not, at first glance, seem to be an advantage, it really is! We all know many words in our ...


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All public Masses used to be a "High Mass," but Low Masses, which developed out of the private mass (missa privata), were introduced to accommodate churches with an insufficient number of clergy to be able to perform a High Mass. See: Jungmann, Josef A, and Francis A Brunner. The Mass of the Roman Rite Its Origins and Development (Missarum Sollemnia). New ...


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Answering the second question first, in general there are two types of Masses: the Requiem, or Mass for the dead, and the usual Mass. Both Types of Masses may be either said or sung. There are some unique variances in Masses on several particular days, for example, Ash Wednesday, Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Pentecost, and Corpus Christi, due to ...


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By what Church permission or instruction is the priest allowed to skip the Act of Penitence and the Kyrie Eleison On some occasions, for example, when the Mass is joined to another rite such as the celebration of a sacrament or the Divine Office penitential rite can be omitted (GILH 94-95). Other than this the Act of Penitence cannot be skipped. Regarding ...



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