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15

The Revised Common Lectionary (by far the most common, used by Roman Catholics, Episcopalians, Methodists, and others) is a three year cycle, and if you attend every Sunday, you are guaranteed to hear selections from every book of the canon, but not necessarily the entirety of each book. That said, there are several texts you will hear repeated, either for ...


11

I think you're looking for the Order of Mass But in General, each Catholic Mass is broken up into 4 parts (It's a little different for Sundays and the few Holy Days of Obligation than it is for weekday Masses; more things are optional for weekday Mass) Introductory Rite A. Procession in to the Church B. Greeting C. Penitential rite (there are a few ...


10

Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (as he then was) wrote about this article of the creed for the Mariological Congress in March 1995. The essay is reprinted in Mary: the church at the source by him and Hans Urs von Balthasar (Ignatius Press, 2005). He speaks about the centrality of the incarnation to Christian faith: In manifesting himself, God shows that he is ...


9

Communion under Both Kinds article at Catholic Encyclopedia has answer to both of your questions Does anyone know when this practice first became accepted? During early times public Communion in the churches was received under both kinds. But side by side with the regular liturgical usage of Communion, there existed from the earliest times the custom of ...


8

Yes, prior to the promulgation of the Novus Ordo Mass finished by 1970, Latin was the language used at Mass throughout the world. The change to the vernacular didn't change the official language of the Catholic Church which is Latin. Many parts of the Mass are still (or can be) proclaimed in Latin. If you've got some time, watch or listen to the Mass on ...


8

The Epistle to the Hebrews is not aware of the Mass because it is not a person. It's a letter on a certain subject to certain people. It talks about the High Priesthood; it isn't an instruction manual on what today has come to be called the Mass. Not all teachings will be in all books. Hebrews isn't an instruction manual for saying the Mass. It's a letter ...


8

Why does the Catholic church have so many Masses throughout the week? It is because of what Mass is to the catholic church. Mass is the Single most important commandment given by Christ to do until the end of times (Do this in remembrance of me Lk 22 / 1 Cor 11). "At the Last Supper, on the night he was betrayed, our Savior instituted the Eucharistic ...


7

Transubstantiation occurs during the consecratory thanksgiving during the single act of worship called the liturgy of the Eucharist. 1377 The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/__P41.HTM During Mass the liturgy of the ...


6

How can one characterize (a rite)? A rite represents tradition about how sacraments (not just Mass) are celebrated. As the early Church grew and spread, it celebrated the sacraments as would be best understood and received in the context of individual cultures, without ever changing their essential form and matter. Which forms of Mass (rites) are ...


6

It is not a prescribed part of the liturgy, and appears to be an accretion from Protestant tradition. One authoritative source says To find the rubrics (regulations which govern the Mass) concerning these gestures, one may turn to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (1970), On Holy Communion and the Worship of the Eucharistic Mystery Outside of ...


6

Why are we "eating" the flesh and blood of Christ? 1. Because Jesus commanded us to In the institution of the Eucharist, Jesus explicitly commands us to eat the bread and drink the wine, saying "This do in remembrance of me." Indeed, as often as we do this, we do "proclaim the Lord's death until He come." Indeed, John goes even further, recording Jesus in ...


6

As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


6

Yes, willfully skipping mass is a grave (mortal) sin. The key word here is willfully - being physically unable to attend, sick, or having other (legitimate) obligations is a valid excuse for not attending. From the Catechism: The Sunday Eucharist is the foundation and confirmation of all Christian practice. For this reason the faithful are obliged to ...


5

I got this manual from my sibling's homework for their subject, Christian Living Formation. Hope this helps. Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 References: 1. The Order of Mass. St. John Bosco Parish Church. 20 August 2010. Web. 5 February 2012. <http://www.saginaw.org/images/stories/PDFs/missal/order-of-mass.pdf>. 2. The Order of Mass. ...


5

It is the English translation of Deo Gratias, which is repeated “in thanksgiving for the graces received at Mass” (Catholic Encyclopedia).


5

In the earliest centuries of the Church, there wasn't a pattern of using liturgical languages, as much as trade languages. In the East, Greek was predominantly used because whereas it was the first language of few people, it was a second language for many people. It's use could symbolize the internationality of the Church, but more practically, it made it ...


5

To answer the question “which Mass is most important,” it’s Sunday. The Catechism states: The Lord's day 1166 "By a tradition handed down from the apostles which took its origin from the very day of Christ's Resurrection, the Church celebrates the Paschal mystery every seventh day, which day is appropriately called the Lord's Day or Sunday."36 The ...


5

Code of Canon Law states: 766.0 Lay persons can be permitted to preach in a church or oratory, if necessity requires it in certain circumstances or it seems advantageous in particular cases, according to the prescripts of the conference of bishops and without prejudice to 767.1 767.1. Among the forms of preaching, the homily, which is part of the ...


5

By what Church permission or instruction is the priest allowed to skip the Act of Penitence and the Kyrie Eleison On some occasions, for example, when the Mass is joined to another rite such as the celebration of a sacrament or the Divine Office penitential rite can be omitted (GILH 94-95). Other than this the Act of Penitence cannot be skipped. Regarding ...


5

When Catholics say that a Mass is celebrated "for" something or someone, it just means that the priest offers the Mass—which for Catholics is the very highest form of prayer—for the sake of some intention. It is a kind of intercessory prayer, and Masses can be offered for any kind of intention (for example, for an end to a war or famine, for a recovery from ...


5

There's no difference between the two in respect of Eucharistic transubstantiation; hence answering "the spiritual", "the natural", or "both" are equally meaningless. My answer to a question on the Catholic understanding of the nature of transubstantiation is supposed to make it clear that what is changed in transubstantiation is the substance of the bread; ...


5

From a Catholic point of view, there is no problem with (a) a Roman Catholic attending an Orthodox Divine Liturgy and receiving communion or (b) an Orthodox attending a Roman Catholic mass and receiving communion. This is, however, restricted to circumstances when a Roman Catholic mass is unavailable. The Orthodox position is different; Roman Catholics ...


4

Exactly when during the Mass does transubstantiation occur? It occurs when a priest, in persona Christi (in the person of Christ), says the Words of Institution. Even though the complete words of institution are necessary, the common view of theologians is that the eight words, "this is my body" and "this is my blood", are on their own the necessary and ...


4

It appears that 21st Sunday of the Year [B Cycle] has at least part of what you are looking for, as Ephesians 5:21-32 has this from the KJV: 21Submitting yourselves one to another in the fear of God. 22Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. 23For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church: ...


4

As a very preliminary point, there are several "Rites" within the Roman Catholic Church1 and some of them have never had, and never will have, Latin liturgical services. So all of the below applies specifically to the Roman Rite (which is the most widespread by far). To lay the basic groundwork: Latin is still the official liturgical language of the Roman ...


4

Aquinas taught transubstantiation -- the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist: Some men accordingly, not paying heed to these things, have contended that Christ's body and blood are not in this sacrament except as in a sign, a thing to be rejected as heretical, since it is contrary to Christ's words... He is invisibly under the species of this ...


4

Not just the introductory right, there are numerous variation for prayers all through the mass. There are 13 Eucharistic Prayers approved by Holy See for use in the United States.src Why are there three options? Because even though all Mass are same in essence, people are invited to meditate upon a certain theme in each mass. Prayers differ depending on ...


4

You're essentially asking "What's the difference between praying for the dead and praying for the living; and which is more important?" Catholicism, by its interpretation of the communion of saints, believes that each living believer is in communion not only with all others living, but equally with those who have "fallen asleep in Christ": "So it is ...



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