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14

No, there is no reliable historical evidence to support such a claim. Before going into the question significantly, I should point out that the number of Baptists killed by the Catholic Church depends on how one defines "Baptist" - apparently, there are some who consider any early sect of Christianity which did not practice infant baptism to be a "proto-...


7

St. Thomas Beckett - 1170 - assassinated at a church for annoying the king who made him Archbishop. St. Bernard and companions - 1226 - killed by the Moors Bl. Charles the Good - 1127 - killed at church after stopping black marketers St. Stanislaus - 1079 - killed after excommunicating a wicked king. St. Elphege - 1012 - killed by Danish invaders for ...


6

Judas, of course, hung himself after betraying Jesus James is the only other Apostle whose death is recorded in Scripture, in Acts 12:1-2 It was about this time that King Herod arrested some who belonged to the church, intending to persecute them. 2 He had James, the brother of John, put to death with the sword. The rest of the Apostles deaths are ...


6

Christians had a revulsion against the exploitation of the games, as evidenced by the story of Telemachus, an Egyptian monk who, in 403 AD threw himself into the arena to stop the gladitorial games. Telemachus died in the melee already on the field, but Emperor Honartius was so inspired by the sacrifice that he put an end to the games on January 1, 404. ...


4

Whether or not James the Greater traveled to Spain is highly contested. The entry on St. James the Greater in the Catholic Encyclopedia from newadvent.org lists some reasons why this is contested. With regard to the preaching of the Gospel in Spain by St. James the greater, several difficulties have been raised: St. James suffered martyrdom ...


3

To clarify the definition of martyrdom, in both Islam and Christianity, martyrdom is achieved by dying, not specifically by taking a life, although in some cases one's death may involve taking the lives of others. The Catholic Church has certainly canonised individuals who died fighting for the Christian cause, but sainthood is not open simply to all who do ...


2

While a complete answer on this subject would take volumes, there are many Christians who were martyred, not for simply being of the wrong religion, but for actions they felt compelled to take because they were Christians. In the Roman era, Christians weren't persecuted because they had a different religion. There were lots of different religions in ancient ...


2

The History of Romanism by John Dowling published in 1845 is where the statistic probably comes from as it's pretty much a verbatim claim. Unfortunately, the footnotes on page 542 say that: No amount of computation can reach the number -History of Romanism Page 542 - footnote#1


2

It does seem unlikely, that number is supposed to be representative of a period of about 1,200 years, but even over that period of time you'd still have to kill at least 114 baptists a day to reach that number. There's always a high estimate and a low estimate when calculating casualties, my initial assumption is that 50 million is the high estimate, and may ...


2

Although this is a more speculative question than ones based on facts, it may be possible to give a reasonable (logical) answer. First of all, St. Seraphim of Sarov (1754-1833) was glorified (canonized) by the Russian Orthodox Church on July 19, 1903. What is interesting here is that Pope St. John Paul II referred to him as a "saint" in his book Crossing ...


2

It is dogma that non-Catholics cannot be martyrs: …no one, whatever almsgiving he has practiced, even if he has shed blood for the name of Christ, can be saved, unless he has remained in the bosom and unity of the Catholic Church.—Pope Eugene IV, Council of Florence, decree Cantate Domino (Martyrs, saints, all those in heaven are saved.)


2

This site provides a copy of the purported prison diary written by Saint Perpetua, written around 203 CE. The diary forms part of the non-canonical Acts of Perpetua and Felicitas, also known as The Passion of St. Perpetua, St. Felicitas, and their Companions. It is a beautifully crafted story and many believe Perpetua and Felicity really existed and that ...


1

At the fall of the western Roman empire triggered by a Roman naval revolt in south east Spain opened the Mediterranean and it's north Africa bread basket to cutting by pirates caused famine in Rome, adding to plague, revolt in the army over devalued payment high taxes to support a large bureaucracy caused the fall of Rome in to smaller states, the population ...


1

I think I can begin to offer an answer to this, though it's still bit's and pieces. Basically, my guess is sometime in the 4thC, (as far as it is possible to tell, given the fragmentary nature of the sources) though it is clear that some number or other seems to be assigned to the death toll relatively early on. My reason for thinking this: R. Brown's The ...



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