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21

It should be noted that Luther and Calvin thought pretty highly of one another, despite their disagreements. Also keep in mind that when Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door, Calvin was less than 10 years old. It must also be remembered that a lot of what is taught under the banner of "Calvinism" today was not necessarily taught nor believed by Calvin, ...


17

Alright I might be one of the few people on this earth that 1) loves the Jewish people, 2) Has married a true Jew by descent, who converted to Christianity after our marriage. 3) Will publish the worst dirt on Luther that can be found. 4) Will then be so crazy as to defend Luther, not against his sin here but in how it should be viewed in context and as ...


15

Nope, it's not, actually. Luther used a form of music "bar form", but he was actually opposed to use of common tunes (like Calvin) for his hymns. The following is from an essay called "Major Forms of BS" by T. David Gordon: I cannot count the number of times I have heard the common myth about Martin Luther employing the tunes of familiar “bar songs” in ...


13

Might this be your quote? "The organ in the worship is the insignia of Baal" (Martin Luther, Mcclintock & Strong's Encyclopedia Volume VI, page 762) This phrase turns up 1,400 results in Google; but it may not be accurate. One researcher, apparently familiar with Luther and this quote, had this rebuttal: Strong DOES NOT use the word ...


12

The Fundamental Change So the question is: How did Luther change from a Catholic theologian to a Protstant theologian? Or to highlight more the historical aspect: How did he change from a late-scholastic to a reformer? Or a last variation: How did the early Luther change to the "old Luther"? This leads us to a certain happening, to a conversion-like ...


11

There is no clear biblical evidence for the non-Virginity of Mary. The Bible never says he had full blooded brothers and sisters. I don't want to delve into translations which I don't understand (Aramaic words for niece, cousin, nephew, etc...), but it is clear that Jesus does however call many people his brothers, and exhorts us all to call others our ...


11

Why did Luther curse those who oppose indulgences? Firstly, he did not curse those who opposed indulgences. He himself was against indulgences. He wrote the 95 theses because of the sale of indulgences: Luther, aflame with indignation, challenged the sale of indulgences and demanded that the entire matter be discussed by the scholars of the University. ...


11

I always find these questions about Luther interesting because the more I follow a questions about Luther, which are often curiously raised, the more impressed I am in his admirable character. Basically there is no story here, other than that Luther was a humble and responsible person who left all he had faithfully to his wife. Luther’s income was very ...


10

Luther saw the church becoming significantly corrupted much earlier than we might think. Generally I would say that Luther perceived a split between the 'real' church and the 'false church' basically around the time of St. Augustine, for he always separated the ritualistic ecclesiastical doctrine of religion, from the Augustinian spiritual doctrine of ...


10

I cannot find a reference that he did, but it's possible he may have on a specific issue. From my research there is no evidence that he every called Calvin "the son of the Devil" and in fact those are Calvin's words, not Luther's. Let's get some facts. Calvin and Luther were contemporaries, both living in Europe during the early to mid 1500s. However, ...


9

The key point of Luther's biblical exegesis was his conviction of Christ's being the rex scripturae1. There is a famous passage from his preface to the "Epistel S. Jacobi und Judas" saying: "This is the right touchstone to criticize all the books: See if they preach Christ or not. […] What Christ did not teach, that is not apostolic, may it have been ...


9

Yes and no. Yes he added it, no it is not the atrocity that it necessarily implies. Part of Luther's defense of the translation is that inclusion of the word "alone" is more grammatically correct than its exclusion. While I'm not an expert in German, I do speak enough of it to know that he does have a point. His problem, though, is in the interpretation of ...


8

Martin Luther and John Calvin followed the tradition of St. Augustine in abhorring any theoretical belief in a state of sinlessness, whether for a moment, day, year, or whatever. They seem to have regarded sinless perfection as the vain imagination of human pride and a result of our sinfulness.  For example, commenting on Psalms  106:6, Calvin said: How ...


7

Luther did not, but William Booth did. He said, "Why should the devil have all the good music." 1 Additionally, one of the most famous songs set to a drinking song is "The Star Spangled Banner." Finally, back to Luther. While he did not set sacred music to drinking songs, he is credited with saying, "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be ...


7

Hard to be certain, but if I were to guess, I'd explain the reasoning like this: Luther had done something unprecedented. There was one Catholic (universal) Church, who claimed that they alone held the keys to salvation. But Luther had dared to claim that salvation could be found outside the authority of the Catholic Church. Obviously this gained him a ...


7

I've found some very interesting quotes of Martin Luther: Christ, our Savior, was the real and natural fruit of Mary's virginal womb . . . This was without the cooperation of a man, and she remained a virgin after that. Luther's Works, eds. Jaroslav Pelikan (vols. 1-30) & Helmut T. Lehmann (vols. 31-55), St. Louis: Concordia Pub. House (vols. 1-30); ...


7

No, it is not true. Luther was widely read in many works of theology and church history and and if you take into consideration his commentary on various church Fathers and the merit or issues with their theology it is ridiculous to make such a claim. It is true that he was sometimes critical of their works, but he clearly used them in his own studies. ...


7

Without having understood the doctrine of the two kingdoms, it's not possible to understand Luther's theology in its full extent. It's a misunderstanding to think that by the justification by faith alone all laws have lost their importance. As short as possible: a Christian lives under two completly different kingdoms, where the one is "God's kingdom under ...


7

Actually, surprisingly,  Luther did think this and did make this accusation.  Luther made John the Baptist's accusation against Herod's adultery seem trivial compared to the corruption of the Roman clergy. Clearly he accused the Roman clergy of practicing sodomy: I am not lying to you. Whoever has been in Rome knows that conditions are unfortunately ...


7

"Protestantism" is the name of a movement. "Protestants" are people who are part of that movement. It's the same relationship as between the words "Catholicism" and "Catholics". Catholics are the people who are part of Catholicism. The problem is that your definition of Protestants is far too narrow. Protestants don't pray to Mary (mostly - there are a few ...


7

I understand by your question and follow up comment, you are really asking, 'Why did Luther reject the traditional sacraments of the Catholic church, which in turn was one of the reasons why the Catholic church branded him as a heretic?' The answer is complex as the rejection of traditional views of the sacraments was not central to what Luther saw as his ...


6

I don't think there is any problem with the order Martin Luther used, as it is the same as the order used by Christ in the Last Supper. I do believe the 1324 order is likely used due to it scaling a little better when the bread and wine are distributed after consecrating them. The Last Supper was only a few people, compared to a Sunday service which could ...


6

Calvin's commentary on Matthew 1:25 deserves to be quoted in full (hat-tip to gmoothart): 25. And knew her not This passage afforded the pretext for great disturbances, which were introduced into the Church, at a former period, by Helvidius. The inference he drew from it was, that Mary remained a virgin no longer than till her first birth, and that ...


6

St. Thomas Beckett - 1170 - assassinated at a church for annoying the king who made him Archbishop. St. Bernard and companions - 1226 - killed by the Moors Bl. Charles the Good - 1127 - killed at church after stopping black marketers St. Stanislaus - 1079 - killed after excommunicating a wicked king. St. Elphege - 1012 - killed by Danish invaders for ...


6

When Luther was excommunicated for insubordination on January 3, 1521, he lost the ability to say he was in the chain. You cannot succeed someone who has disowned you. Note the date to which most people would ascribe the "beginning of the Protestant Reformation" (a bad term since it was really a process that had been going on since the 1300s!) is October ...


6

Yes it is, Martin Luther was after all: angry and upset at the Pope and the Catholic clergy. Some examples would be: "no sooner do I pass a motion than they smell it in rome. Saying in effect that Rome was a cess pool. Many times does he call Monks the "lice placed by the devil on God's almighty fur coat." There are of course many other things I won't ...


6

Originally Luther loved to pray to Mary: “I chose twenty-one saints and prayed to three every day when I celebrated mass; thus I completed the number every week. I prayed especially to the Blessed Virgin, who with her womanly heart would compassionately appease her Son.  (Luther's Works V54.340) After being what he called born again, which is often ...


6

Martin Luther did not condemn pilgramages as much as serveral other practices but his loathing of pilgramages is quite clear in his writings. As with many things in the reformation, Luther's earlier writings moderatly condemn the practice and then his comments tend to become more severe as the reformation matured. Early in the reformation, Luther attributed ...


6

According to a book by James Nestingen, On Luther's "Gospel discovery," his "tower experience," I agree with Nestingen (and Lohse) that it probably coincided with his name change from Luder the Luther, "a small change based on the Greek word for freedom, elutherius. I see the similarity as too exceptional simply to explain Luther's name change as merely ...


6

Yes and no. He preferred the gospel of John over the synoptic gospels, under his somewhat unusual view of revelational clarity within the canonical books. i.e. some books are more clear and powerful then others. For example, many would agree that Romans is more useful than proverbs in terms of communicating the message of salvation, but Luther was much more ...



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