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16

My first answer wasn't very good; I want to take a different angle. I hope this approach helps make this issue more clear. TL;DR You don't have to stage a protest to be Protestant. It's a matter of heritage. Of fallacies and analogies... Your question commits some basic fallacies that can easily be addressed. cite an accurate historical reference ...


12

The Fundamental Change So the question is: How did Luther change from a Catholic theologian to a Protstant theologian? Or to highlight more the historical aspect: How did he change from a late-scholastic to a reformer? Or a last variation: How did the early Luther change to the "old Luther"? This leads us to a certain happening, to a conversion-like ...


8

There is a teaching that is very common in Baptist Churches that the Baptist Church has its origins in the New Testament Church, long before the Reformation. A fair representation of the teaching is found at Providence Baptist Ministries. A summary of the teaching consists of the following points: There have always, since the time of the New Testament ...


8

This is a quick rundown, keeping in mind that not every individual parish fully subscribes to everything their parent organization does (don't judge a book by its cover, but be aware of the connotations each cover generally carries): Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) The Bible is inspired and inerrant, the Confessions are a clear and accurate ...


7

I believe you're confusing etymology with history. "Protestant" while it may have originally referred to a limited subset of non-Catholic Westerners (specifically, a very small group of Lutherans around the Diet of Speyer in 1529), now (generally) means "non-Catholic Christian" (Rome is not necessarily the definitive standard, however: "Protestant" or may ...


7

Speaking as someone who went to a lutheran seminary, let's attack these questions one at a time, shall we? Is this "Law" of ("Law and Gospel") referring to the Old Testament law? The Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord says in Section V "Law and Gospel"... Anything that preaches concerning our sins and God's wrath, let it be done how or ...


6

The idea behind the term "protestant" may have originated in those who literally protested the Catholic Church, but today it has a somewhat broader meaning. It has come to mean that a church believes that the Catholic Church lost its way, and that it is necessary to teach correct doctrine as described in the Bible, instead of Biblical doctrines mingled with ...


6

The modern Baptist denominations and adherents descend from the Anabaptist movement which was part of the 16th century Reformation. Several Baptist churches hold to similar creeds to the Nicene (or, more commonly in my experience, confessions of faith or faith statements). There are also hundreds of Baptist churches which call themselves "Reformed" (I grew ...


6

Hmm, I think Ignatius Theophorus has the most historically accurate answer, and yet as of my visit here he has the fewest votes. :-) Let me build on Ignatius. The term "Protestant" was coined when the Lutheran delegates to the Diet of Speyer protested against the pro-Catholic, anti-Lutheran decisions of that council. But from there the word "Protestant" ...


5

The Protestant Reformation is based on, among other things, "sola scriptura"--that the Bible alone is the basis for all doctrine and practice. There are probably two essential points in this matter. The Priesthood of All Believers First, a common doctrine of Protestants is the priesthood of all believers. It is believed that there is no biblical ...


5

There's a belief among Baptists known as the "Trail of Blood," which traces Baptist beliefs back through the Anabaptists, Waldensians and various other groups all the way back to the pre-Nicene church. Take a look at "The Pilgrim Church" by E.H. Broadbent for more info on that. As far as I understand the claim, there's really no way to authenticate it one ...


5

According to most independent, fundamentalist Baptists, (and to the best of my knowledge, the groups that you mentioned) justification is a one-time event that happens at the moment of conversion, when a sinner repents on his or her sins and puts their faith in Christ for salvation. This would be in line with a Calvinist view. Justification is a result of ...


5

I generally write from a reformed perspective, but I don't think there's anything in this post that other Christians (Oriental Orthodox and Church of the East aside) would disagree with. The doctrine was first formulated clearly by the Council of Chalcedon: One and the same Son, the Self-same Perfect in Godhead, the Self-same Perfect in Manhood; truly ...


3

The Laestadian Lutheran Church (LLC), the American branch of the Laestadians, defines sin by quoting Ro. 14:23 saying sin is "whatsoever is not of faith". One reason they think it's sinful is that there's a whole lot on TV and in popular music that meets that criterion. And since it is part of their mission to promote "Christian values and ethics", seeing ...


3

I am not familiar with what modern Lutherans might believe, if any different from Luther, but I am very familiar with what Calvin and Luther thought. They thought the same in many ways but used different lenses. I do not see them at disagreement. They differed in emphasis and detail. Luther emphasized Christ dying for all (which Calvin also believed). ...


3

That linked Wikipedia article is incorrect in it's description of free will. Both of the main views (Calvinism and Arminianism) assert a free will of sorts - man is not as bad as he could possibly be and we recognise that non-Christians can make good and bad decisions. Furthermore, both sides agree that an unregenerate sinner cannot do anything to please God ...


3

I can't speak much to the Lutheran or Calvinist view, but I can give my own perspective (Wesleyan Arminian): In the Arminian understanding, human beings were created by God as part of God's good creation, but we were given free will which enabled us to turn away from God's will. In order to bring us back, God provided the means of grace that enables us to ...


3

To get this, we have to start with the definition of transsubstantiation. The idea of "transubstantiation" is that the bread and wine at the time of communion (after it has been blessed/consecrated) actually becomes the blood of Jesus and body of Jesus (physical blood and body of Jesus, not just symbolic) . If you compare this with the Lutheran concept, ...


3

Lutherans who hold to their confessions [ http://bookofconcord.org/ ] believe that justification, faith, and baptism go together. A baptized infant believes the Gospel at its baptism. An adult who falls away from faith in Christ which has been given in Baptism and is converted is returning to the promise of the Gospel which has been applied to him in ...


3

Matins and Vespers are prayer services prescribed for the morning and evening respectively, and the terms generally refer to services with particular orders of worship laid down in various hymnals used by the Lutheran denominations. However, while "matins" is an order of worship established for use in the morning, there are some congregations, and some ...


2

In the Methodist tradition, a person is justified when they accept the grace God has given them, and make a decision to follow his will rather than their own. Though justification by itself is not a process, it is the beginning of the process of sanctification, in which we work with God to transform us into the people God intended us to be. This is, as far ...


2

Apparently different Lutheran churches have different practices, with two Scandinavian state churches being the most notable proponents of apostolic succession (source): Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland Church of Sweden These churches don't have the Sacrament of Holy Orders, as Luther rejected it. Still, bishops, priests and deacons are ordained, ...


2

First and foremost, nobody - neither Catholic nor Protestant - believes that a priest "forgives" sins. At best, they act as an intermediary, supplicating to Jesus, who alone forgives sin. As the Cathecism of the Catholic church states: Only God forgives sins. The priest is the sign and the instrument of God's merciful love for the sinner. The ...


2

Your can read the whole chapter about this in "An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith" of saint John of Damascus (675-749 AD). He said: When, then, we speak of His divinity we do not ascribe to it the properties of humanity. For we do not say that His divinity is subject to passion or created. Nor, again, do we predicate of His flesh or of His ...


2

You should check into the Book of Concord as there are several sections (of which the Small/Large Catechism is a part) that address this specifically (http://bookofconcord.org/sd-supper.php - The Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord). "Did" is also implied to a degree, because without Christ having done his work, the sacrament wouldn't exist. I'll ...


2

From the WELS website: If anyone is willing to sit down and talk with us, we'd be happy to explain what we mean and what statements of the Bible are involved...If we find that the other people are ignorant or unaware of the errors in their churches, we would never avoid or refuse to encourage them or possibly even worship with them on occasion. It ...


1

“Protestants do not believe in confession.” The statement is correct only insofar as Protestants do not practice auricular confession (confessing ones’ sins to a priest in order to receive forgiveness). That statement along with others I have heard and read shows that there is a misunderstanding about the Protestant view of confession. That God calls us to ...



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