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10

I am not aware of a verse that says explicitly that "God loves everyone equally". In fact, there are some verses to suggest that some are loved more than others, which is not your question so will be neglected1, but there are several that indicate that God indeed loves all people. The first is probably the most quoted Bible verse of all time: For God so ...


7

The commonly held understanding is partially correct, but overstated. In reality, the semantic range of the words is broader. Agape It is true that the words ἀγαπάω (agapaó) and ἀγάπη (agapé) came to mean something like "the highest form of love," but this was primarily due later Christian usage of the term. At the time of the New Testament's writing, ...


7

I believe that the answer to this is something related to the narrative's approach. We can infer from what we know about the godhead, that the Son loves the Father, but the focus in the gospels narrative is not that, the focus is that the Father loves the Son, then, the Son loves us and the Son obey the Father. I'll try to examplify this with some text. ...


6

The speaker is Michael Oh, the founder of Christ Bible Institute Japan. He is of Korean heritage but grew up in America. I found a video (plus transcript) that explains more fully his animosity toward Japan, and the process of forgiveness he underwent. The video is of a talk he gave on night 5 of the Urbana missions conference in 2009. The animosity ...


6

From the Recapitulatio of Fr. Réginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.'s De Virtutibus Theologicis (p. 20), a commentary on St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica II-II, he gives the following categorization of the virtues (virtutes), following the organization of St. Thomas's treatment of the virtues in his Summa: Here's a rough translation: The Virtues ...


5

We are not quite sure how our affectivity (emotions, passions, and so on) will work in Heaven before the General Resurrection, however the Church teaches dogmatically that all human beings will receive their bodies at the General Judgment. As the Nicene-Constantopolitan Creed (the one said at Mass nearly every Sunday) says I look forward to the ...


4

Anthony Thiselton, in his NIGTC commentary, has offered the following translation of 1 Cor 13:7: It never tires of support, never loses faith, never exhausts hope, never gives up. Here, the phrase "never loses faith" is used to translate πάντα πιστεύει (panta pisteuei). The basic argument underlying this translation is that panta ("all things") here ...


4

FIRST THINGS FIRST I hate to sound like Pilate, but "What is love?" A decent answer to your question depends first on an answer that question, particularly as it relates to God's love for us human critters. We're all somewhat familiar with the "four loves": the love of friends (phileo), the love of family members (storge), the love of romance and ...


3

The Catechism says God's love for Israel is compared to a father's love for his son. His love for his people is stronger than a mother's for her children. God loves his people more than a bridegroom his beloved; his love will be victorious over even the worst infidelities and will extend to his most precious gift: "God so loved the world that he gave ...


3

St. Thomas Aquinas defines love (amor) as something that "belongs to the appetitive [spec., concupiscible] power which is a passive faculty" (Summa Theologica I-II q. 27 a. 1 c.). "Love (amor) is something pertaining to the appetite". (ibid. I-II q. 26 a. 1 c.)"Passion is the effect of the agent on the patient." (ibid. I-II q. 26 a. 2 c.) A sensitive ...


3

John 14 (NIV) says this: Then Judas (not Judas Iscariot) said, “But, Lord, why do you intend to show yourself to us and not to the world?” 23 Jesus replied, “Anyone who loves me will obey my teaching. My Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. 24 Anyone who does not love me will not obey my teaching. These ...


3

The Original Poster raises a number of related questions, which have to do with the nature of love and how that applies to human relationships (in particular when they are abusive). From the outset, it is important to note, as freethinker26 states, that the Catholic Church does not condone or otherwise encourage abusive relationships. In reality, such ...


2

The first thought that came to my mind regarding this is a quote by English writer G. K. Chesterton: The truth is, of course, that the curtness of the Ten Commandments is an evidence, not of the gloom and narrowness of a religion, but, on the contrary, of its liberality and humanity. It is shorter to state the things forbidden than the things permitted; ...


2

Do our fallen, finite nature and our relationship with God set us up for abusive relationships in this life? According to the Catholic Church, yes it does predispose people for suffering and thus for abuse and abusive relationships. Man sinned, and by doing so forfeited the four-fold harmony by which he was protected from suffering and death. Some ...


2

When the Old Testament speaks of "neighbour" it speaks of Jews, as opposed to Gentiles. So, when Leviticus 19:18 says to love your neighbour, it means other Jews, but not outsiders: Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD. Of course, the gospels ...


2

John 3:16: For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. Romans 8:16-17: The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer ...


1

The events surrounding Jesus' death are rife with trickery and very clearly outside of normal legal proceedings for the time. The short answer is that the Jews believed Jesus committed blasphemy, but they had it out for him long before He supposedly did blaspheme. Before Jesus was captured and executed, the High Priest and his assembly plotted to kill ...


1

Yes, prudence is #1. The rest flow from it, knowing what is right and choosing to do it is the basis for the other 3 virtues. This what is taught in the 8th Grade Faith and Life series textbooks distributed by Ignatius Press. I don't know what catechetical reference there is for it and I don't have the textbook any more. But it expands on how the ...


1

St. Thomas Aquinas answers this question in his Summa Theologica I q. 20 a. 3 ("Whether God loves all things equally?") c., making a twofold distinction: Since to love a thing is to will it good, in a twofold way anything may be loved more, or less. In one way on the part of the act of the will itself, which is more or less intense. In this way ...


1

It may not be the only "purpose of life", but it's one of the things that we get to do. "15 The Lord God took the man and placed him in the orchard in Eden to care for it and to maintain it." -- Genesis 2:15 (NET) from: https://lumina.bible.org/bible/Genesis+2 Jesus gives us additional purposes of life in the Gospels: “37 Jesus said to him, “‘Love the ...


1

Wikipedia gives a brief overview of how the commandment has generally been seen as "new." It accords with what I've heard through the years: The "New Commandment", the Wycliffe Bible Commentary states, "was new in that the love was to be exercised toward others not because they belonged to the same nation, but because they belonged to Christ...and the ...


1

Matthew 5:44-48 44 But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. 46 For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the ...


1

The quote is radical, but yes it is scriptural and is definitely helpful to those who are scrupulous about things, as I myself am. Sanctity is definitely biblical (for those Protestants who hold the Bible as the only authority). Just read the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5-7. These are not suggestions, but commands by our Lord to be holy, as our father in ...


1

The answer to your question is actually very simple. In the Bible there are 2 MAIN kinds of the Fear of the Lord. There is an unholy fear of God that makes a person to run away from God and there is a Holy Fear of God that makes a person run to God. Learning to distinguish between a Fear that you must have and a fear that you MUST NOT have is 1 of the ...


1

Mark 12:30-31 (KJV) And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these. From here we can see that there are ...



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