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18

There are two differences here: "from evil" (KJV) versus "from the evil one" (NIV) "for thine is the kingdom..." in the KJV but not the NIV. The first difference reflects an alternative translation choice for the Greek word "πονηροῦ". This might be in the masculine or the neuter gender - the word forms are the same. But there is a difference in meaning: ...


9

The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from ...


6

It is not a prescribed part of the liturgy, and appears to be an accretion from Protestant tradition. One authoritative source says To find the rubrics (regulations which govern the Mass) concerning these gestures, one may turn to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (1970), On Holy Communion and the Worship of the Eucharistic Mystery Outside of ...


5

There are two main reasons we recite the Lord's Prayer in worship: It is a model prayer that Jesus gave us to teach us how to pray. We recite it to remind ourselves what genuine prayer looks like. We pray it as a group to unify the congregation. When we recite the Lord's Prayer, we are all speaking to God with one voice.


4

Forgiving others is very, very important. Firstly, we emphasize the primary importance of love in the life of a believer: The goal of this command is love, which comes from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith. 1 TImothy 1:5 NIV Compare also the well known Great Commandment. The vital importance of forgiving others is made manifest ...


3

The reason for the presence or absence of the brief doxology at the end of the Lord's Prayer is actually liturgical use. In Eastern-rite usage, the doxology is recited in the liturgy after the Lord's Prayer; this is probably how the phrase crept into Eastern Greek mediaeval manuscripts of the New Testament. These manuscripts are ultimately the ones on which ...


3

We pray to our heavenly Father, in Jesus' name, for several reasons (most reasoning sourced here): We are told to address all prayer to God the Father. (see also 1 Peter 1:17 and Ephesians 3:14) This, then, is how you should pray: ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name,' (Matthew 6:9) We can only approach the Father in the name of Jesus, the ...


3

2) Is the Lord's prayer recited by anyone anywhere else in the Bible other than when Jesus first says it to the disciples? There are similarities between the Lord's Prayer and others prayers recited in those days as the Kaddish. So it could be said that Jesus used a common pattern to make up His prayer based in what they know: Jewish traditions. We ...


2

Martin Luther once participated in a debate with Ulrich Zwingli’s over whether the Lords Supper was actually the body of Christ or simply a remembrance of it. It is reported that Martin Luther walked into the debate, went up to the board and took a piece of chalk and wrote “This Is my Body” then left the debate without looking back. The translation of the ...


2

In the record of the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6, the additional phrase appears in the 1611 edition of the KJV, the Tyndale Bible, and, it appears, in the German Luther Bible of 1545. I can't read German, except for "Amen", but it looks like it's there. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, ...


2

Euan Cameron says, in Interpreting Christian History, page 126-7, the early Church had no cult of saints, but around the time of the persecutions, Christians began to commemorate their martyrs, to inspire their successors and protect their memory. A little later, some Church Fathers decided that the saints must still feel the same concern for the faithful ...


2

This may be a simplistic answer, but it came as something of an "aha!" moment to me when I first heard it many years ago: In general, it is probably not the best idea to ask God to do something God doesn't want to do, or to ask God not to do something God does want to do. Presumably God's will and God's knowledge of the situation is better than ours. So if ...


1

Jesus said it best in Matthew 4:4 (KJV) But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God. John 6:48 (KJV) I am that bread of life. And because Jesus is that bread of life, the commandment that was given in order to grow spiritually can be found in various ...


1

Most Christians believe that it is acceptable and even good to pray to God to supply the necessities and amenities of life. That is reflected in your quote from Luther's Small Catechism. And yet, Jesus' words often have more than one meaning. The whole sequence in John 6:22-71 makes it clear that in associating bread with his flesh, Jesus was speaking ...


1

There are two different questions embedded in what you ask. Let's cover them separately. "Praying to" saints, Mary etc., which is done largely by the Catholic and Orthodox denominations and rarely by others, is fundamentally different from praying to God. Strictly they are not asking the saints to grant their prayers, but asking the saints to also pray to ...


1

<<>> One specific Biblical reference comes to mind in the martyrdom of Stephen. When Stephen lifts up his eyes to Heaven, just before he dies he prays (cries out) Acts 7:59 "While they were stoning him, Stephen prayed, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” 60 Then he fell on his knees and cried out, “Lord, do not hold this sin against them.” When he had ...


1

Interestingly, when it comes to prayer, two members of the Trinity have specific roles that are pointed out in Scripture. In 1 John 2, we read: My dear children, I write this to you so that you will not sin. But if anybody does sin, we have an advocate with the Father—Jesus Christ, the Righteous One. As Jesus is our advocate in regards to sin, it is ...


1

The earliest known Scriptural manuscript in which it appears is the Codex Washingtonianus (third-oldest Bible), dated to the late 4th/early 5th century. Interestingly enough Jerome would have been working on the Vulgate at a similar time to this; the Vulgate does not contain the doxology. The King James Bible and a small selection of other translations use ...


1

Sort of? Strictly speaking it comes from the medieval manuscripts which the reformation theologians inherited, but it is not quite that simple. The text is clearly missing from the most ancient manuscripts of Matthew, but it was present in the Renaissance. Someone in some scriptorium added that passage at a later date. On the other hand, we know that the ...



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