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22

Nothing to do with religion / God / whatever, but there seems to be a fundamental flaw in your argument here. Event A causes event B within the universe. God decides that he does not want event B to occur so he stops event A from happening. Event A no longer happened and therefore God would never intervene in the first place. Go to 1. The ...


15

I can't answer the question in the way you're asking it, but I can 'disarm' numerology for you. When you encounter something, like say, a set of best practices in an activity, the number of units you decide to divide the information into determines the symbolic meaning you are essentially attaching to the set. This is possible with pretty much everything, so ...


14

Atheism is a belief system which makes claims about spiritual things. Atheism says there are no gods, but so do other belief systems which no one denies are religions, such as some forms of Buddhism. Atheism contrasts with religions, rather than social or political movements like egalitarianism, anarchism, communism, so it makes sense to classify it as a ...


13

Because God decided faith was an absolute requirement in His kingdom: But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is Hebrews 11:6 KJV Actually, Jesus is apparently frustrated with those who desire the type of "sign" you suggest: And he sighed deeply in his spirit, and saith, Why doth this ...


11

I think it is important to consider how you would react if God did exactly what you asked for, in an unmistakable way. While doing so consider the many times in the Bible where Jesus healed people. The Pharisees saw this and knew (or should have known) they were dealing with the Christ. Yet they plotted to kill Him. They would have seen the evidence for ...


11

This is a difficult question, given that human reasoning is itself flawed. But if we were to look at the canonization process, the most we could say is that it must be not be absurd; Consider how Matthias was chosen to succeed Judas; even though the process of 'drawing lots' seems irrational, the lots were being drawn against a few possible candidates and ...


9

There are an awful lot of assumptions here. There is but one way to stop B There is no way to stop B if A has happened Etc But it mainly boils down to this main flaw in the logic: Event A no longer happened and therefore God would never intervene in the first place. Go to 1. Being all knowing God would of course be able to know the possibility of ...


8

The classic arguments I know are the following : Cosmological argument: That every thing that has a beginning must have a cause. Theological argument: The order and the useful setting in a system imply an intelligence and a finality that did the organization. Ontological argument: That the idea of God itself is a proof for the existence of God. How can a ...


8

I think you're referring to The Transcendental Argument for the Existence of God (TAG). It was first formulated by Immanuel Kant, but has been refined, disputed and defended over the years. The argument One formulation of the argument is, Prove A: The Christian God exists. Step 1 ~A: (Assume the opposite of what we are trying to prove): The Christian ...


7

Though I personally tend to favour expository preaching in practice, topical preaching certainly has its place. Scriptural Basis A case could be made from Scriptural example... Jesus's Preaching Jesus's recorded preaching was purely topical - as far as I know, he never took a passage from the Old Testament and expanded on it. Rather, he chose topics ...


7

No Overwhelming Proof There may be cause to distinguish between, "Is there a way to prove the existence of the God of the Bible to all people in all times?" from the question of "Has there ever been a way to prove the existence of the God of the Bible?" The answer to latter question is affirmative, although the accounts of this are recorded in the Bible ...


6

In Mere Christianity, CS Lewis describes such a proof (source): My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I got this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust? If the whole show was bad ...


6

First, it depends what you mean by proof. Mathematical proof Scientific proof Court of law proof The first of these is the strongest: you can build absolute proofs that cannot be refuted by anyone who accepts the principles of Mathematics. However, such proofs are limited to the perfect abstractions described by mathematicians, and don't necessarily work ...


5

I am not sure about the word religion, but one can argue that (a form of) atheism is a belief system. A belief system is a system of beliefs. Some beliefs depend on others, forming an interrelated set of beliefs and their implications. Strong atheism is defined as belief that there are no gods. Many call this just "atheism". Well, this belief has ...


5

I believe you miss a few key points about the halting problem. Just because there is no algorithm that can decide for every input program if it will halt, does not mean that no algorithms exist for any given input. See: Are Impossibility Proofs Possible?- Halting Problem for examples. You assume that God would have to function over every single ...


5

No, there are no scientific experiments that you could run to show the existence of God. When Christians talk about proving God, they mean something along the lines of Malachi 3:10 (NRSV) Bring the full tithe into the storehouse, so that there may be food in my house, and thus put me to the test, says the Lord of hosts; see if I will not open the ...


4

I guess I'm going to have to expand on my little rant :) The Gospel we find in Scripture is all about the good news of God revealing Himself to and reconciling us to Himself. This is quite the opposite of hiding himself. We still have free will to reject the evidence -to turn our backs on his revelation- but this is not at all the same thing as not having ...


4

In a nutshell, systematic expository preaching ensures that the Word is preached, the whole Word is preached, and that the pastor has less of an opportunity to rehash his own opinion or stick to a "canon within the canon." Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching (which is probably the best preaching text since John Broaddus), says: The thing ...


4

God has revealed Himself beyond reasonable doubt - otherwise requiring faith would be unjust. We can argue about what constitutes reasonable, but according to the Bible, there is enough evidence. Rom 1:18-20 NIV The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of men who suppress the truth by their wickedness, ...


3

You're assuming that self-reference is required somehow, that God has to "evaluate himself" (whatever that means) when making decisions, and that his decision-making is based solely on observation and not on any sort of predictive ability. There's a much simpler conceptual model: "Something important is about to happen. There are three possible outcomes. ...


3

Jesus claimed to be the God of the the Bible a few times, and he even used the scriptures to support his case (here is only a few verses to make this case): Jesus claimed to be God: Philip said to him, “Lord, show us the Father, and it is enough for us.” Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you so long, and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever ...


3

Anyone who's served on a jury knows that the range of what constitutes "reasonable doubt" is pretty huge with only 12 people in the room. Make it a (much) bigger room, expand the pool to 6 billion, and you'll have a range from total credulity to solipsism. If your definition of God includes some sort of fairness, then the requisite self-disclosure should ...


3

Re-appropriating the term atheism is what is causing the issue. If we break the word down it is clear that the first definition should be "a belief that there is or are no god(s)." The prefix a has long been used as a reversal, or negation, for the term that follows it. The suffix ism has long been used for any kind of belief or organized thought system. The ...


3

I haven't personally read Alvin Plantinga, but I've read that he tried to answer question of "natural evil" in a very interesting way. See some short description here http://www.iep.utm.edu/evil-log/#H6 and more in his books: "The Nature of Necessary", "God, Freedom, and Evil". What I personally think is that there is a great problem of perception. I think ...


3

The God of the Bible states "I declare the end from the beginning." In comparing God to an algorithm, you go against the fundamental claims of God --that is, you create a straw man to knock over. God is not an algorithm, waiting for an asynchronous user event or for some unseen input data. God is the author of the data and thus by necessity of being its ...


2

It is, I suppose, conceivable that God is not bound by the laws of logic. But if true further discussion is impossible, as how are we to consider the possibilities except by using logic? I can't imagine how I could prove this either way. Will I present a logical proof that logic always applies? But if logic doesn't apply, then the proof is invalid, and the ...


1

@breana I welcome you to ChristianityStackExchange with an answer I believe this is the answer you may be looking for WMAP Site FAQs 9. I am religious and I also find science very exciting. Is there a conflict between science and religion? According to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS): Science is a particular way of knowing about the world. In ...


1

I think the answer here is to be found in the glory of God. The catechism says that "Man's chief end is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever." That would sound silly if God were a mere man, or even someone as petty as the Greek or Norse gods. But if you take the God of the Bible, Who knows everything, is all-powerful, is all-good, and all-wise, then it seems ...


1

In addition to the criteria mentioned above, historically there was a claim of apostolic authorship. See: http://christianity.stackexchange.com/a/5527/1039



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