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26

I believe one reason is because of the Great Commission, in which it is written (Matt. 28:19), "Therefore, go and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit." Ontologically, the Son is begotten by the Father, and the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father, but the Father is neither begotten nor proceeding. Thus, ...


18

There seems to be two questions here. First, "why are LDS temple ceremonies kept secret, seeing as how Old Testament temple ceremonies were not?" The simple answer is that the Old Testament temples operated under the Law of Moses and were administered by the Levitical priesthood, whereas modern temples operate under the Law of the Gospel and are ...


16

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


13

The Phrase "Holy catholic Church" does not refer to the Roman Catholic church, but to the "universal church", i.e. all true Christians, whatever earthly religious organization they belong to. The word 'catholic' just means universal. That and the "Communion of Saints" refers to a belief in the essential unity of all true Christians, whatever disagreements ...


13

[Answer from high-church Anglican/Catholic perspective.] The deacon is not censed — or should not be censed — at the reading of the gospel. The thurifer should hand the thurible to the deacon, who censes the book. The thurifer generally remains while the gospel is read, and indeed the gospel may end up proclaimed from within the cloud. Incense ...


11

This answer relates to the Church of Scotland. Dancing has often been regarded with deep suspicion in the Presbyterian tradition. Originally, it was strongly associated with all kinds of bad behaviour, and would certainly not be permitted in church. Even after dancing became more socially acceptable, church was still meant to be a solemn and sober place. ...


8

Different communities adopted Arabc at various times. The earliest community to start using Arabic were the Greek Orthodox of Palestine, who started translating the liturgy and theological books into Arabic in the 8th century. For a more general history of Arab Christianity, I'd consult The Church in the Shadow of the Mosque by Sidney Griffith. For evidence ...


8

Yes and No It is fair to say that Baptist services are liturgical, but I don't think I'd say that they have "a" liturgy (meaning that they generally adhere to a common liturgy). Many Baptist churches I've been to don't quite follow the formula you described. Most follow it somewhat, but I think that to call it a common liturgy, it needs to be followed ...


7

It's cultural. This is a Catholic answer, but not based on Catholic Dogma or even the Bible. It's just common sense. In the Western Hemisphere, and western Europe (commonly and ruefully [here at least] referred to as the West) we don't need dance to communicate. Furthermore, we can't even interpret dance as language. In African (and other) cultures ...


7

Christian liturgy is closely tied to the Christian calendar. The Urban Ministry Institute, which produces a lovely calendar each year, notes: Since our earliest records, the Church has made it a point to remember and celebrate the events of the life of Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ. The ancient Church centered its worship and witness on the person and ...


7

I am a member of the United Methodist Church, so my answer will be from that perspective. In the United Methodist Church, preachers preach from the Lectionary. According to Wikipedia: The Revised Common Lectionary was the product of a collaboration between the North American Consultation on Common Texts (CCT) and the International English Language ...


7

Episcopalians: The ushers count the congregation and count the wafers to match. If they miscounted the Priest in charge reserves the wafers in a "tabernacle" on the altar. They drink all of the wine/water. If a wafer is dropped it is retrieved quickly and consumed by the Priest. Whether or not individuals believe the wafer is the actual body of Christ is ...


7

I attended meetings of the Vineyard for a period of a year and the members there exercised the gifts of the Spirit, with multiple people, one at a time, giving revelation and prophesying, tongues and interpretations. Then they bunched together and prayed for healings for the afflicted. I attended a Brethren-inspired gathering for about 8 years. There, they ...


6

The Oriental Orthodox churches are somewhat divided on this, many still celebrate the Divine Liturgy in Syriac (which is a later dialect of Middle Aramaic). One of the biggest reasons is that many Oriental Orthodox consider the Syriac Peshitta to be the authoritative scriptures, some even insisting on New Testament Aramaic primacy (such as the ...


6

"New" in this sense, is as in, "New covenant (or new testament, if you're going by a literal translation of the word covenant)." It is "new" as in it only 1200 (Aquinas wrote it), as opposed to the 4000(?) year old covenant of Abraham and the 2500 year old covenant of Moses. It means that the believer is able to relate directly to the Godhead through the ...


5

Lamentations. And here is why. While the 12 Gospels contains much more theological material, at the end of Lamentations there usually is (at least in my experience) the moment where you enter the church 'under the bier', as though you are entering the grave following Christ, which you only come out of after the procession early on Sunday morning. So, ...


5

The first source for the history of the liturgical celebration of the Eucharist is obviously the account of the Last Supper in the New Testament. It was because Our Lord told us to do what He had done, in memory of Him, that Christian liturgies exist. Despite the differences in the various Eucharistic liturgies they all obey His command to do "this," namely ...


5

How can one characterize (a rite)? A rite represents tradition about how sacraments (not just Mass) are celebrated. As the early Church grew and spread, it celebrated the sacraments as would be best understood and received in the context of individual cultures, without ever changing their essential form and matter. Which forms of Mass (rites) are ...


5

Imprecatory Psalms John Wesley escised 34 Psalms altogether, and removed portions of another 58. To imprecate means to invoke evil upon, or curse. Imprecatory psalms, also called the cursing psalms, are those psalms that contain prayers for God's judgment on the psalmist's enemies. Examples: "Let death take my enemies by surprise; let them go down ...


4

I think many Christians view dancing with suspicion because it inherently focuses attention on the body, and we need to be careful in how we think about the bodies of people other than our spouses. Many dances involve close physical contact between two people. To what extent is this appropriate? Or if we are observing someone dance, especially men observing ...


4

I would suggest that all ritual in general did not pass away simply because the edicts of the old law was fulfilled. There is a lot that Tradition speaks to in terms of ritual use within the context of the Church as evidenced by what we know early Christians did, however, since you asked for a biblical reason, I might point you to the passages surrounding ...


4

"Protestantism" is extremely diverse, and there is pretty much no single way that Protestants do anything. This is especially true of the Eucharist. Some Protestants do believe that the transformation of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Jesus is real. Others believe in treating the communion elements with special reverence even if the ...


4

"Catholic" is like the opposite of a word such as Jacuzzi, Xerox, or Kleenex. The latter are brands that have become synonymous with a specific meaning: hot tub, copy machine, tissue. The former had a specific meaning, and is now associated with a "brand" of Christianity. The former meaning is that you can think of the word "Catholic" as a synonym for the ...


4

It is called as Aër. is the largest and outermost of the veils covering the Chalice and Diskos (paten) in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine Rite. It is rectangular in shape and corresponds to the veil used to cover the chalice and paten in the Latin Rite, but is larger. There was the following in ...


3

Perhaps some early Christians sang choruses at the beginning of worship, but this was not a standard part of the order of worship. New Testament From the beginning, worship was centered around the Eucharist. The New Testament does not contain an order of worship, but Paul mentions worship practices in a few of his letters. He talks about worship songs in ...


3

Some Lutheran churches have an extra drain in the kitchen (sacristy) sink for disposal of extra, unused communion wine. This extra drain dumps directly to the soil underneath. The idea is that it is more respectful to dump on soil than to mix with sewage. Page 13 of this FAQ from the LC-MS Lutherans explains their policy on disposal of the communion ...


3

Question: is "the New Rite" necessarily a proper noun, or could this be a general reference to all old forms of repetitive forms of worship being replaced by "true worship of the heart," which in turn grow stale and must be replaced by new energetic forms of worship? This the translation I found at the Catholic Encyclopedia: Down in adoration falling, ...


3

It's safe to say that everyone has a liturgy. edit: Liturgy (Greek: Λειτουργία) is the customary public worship done by a specific religious group, according to its particular traditions. (Wikipedia - don't kill me it's the first I could find in response to the comment). Even denominations who wish to distance themselves from "The Liturgical Tradition" ...


3

To understand why religious ritual and ceremony are still important, we must first understand what it means to say that Jesus is the fulfillment of the law. Fulfill does not mean abolish (Matthew 5:17). The purpose of the ceremonial law was to serve as a visible reminder to the Jews of the invisible God they worshipped. For Christians, Jesus serves as that ...


3

I cannot answer your question concerning exactly how the English moved away from this Rite. As I understand it this Rite was never officially suppressed by Rome. The Rite however is not completely defunct. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21pnAoiGnjs The Catholic church recently authorized an Anglican Use Rite. Pope Benedict promulgated this in 2009 with the ...



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