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Lent Lent is a period of penance in preparation for Triduum (Maundy Thurs. through Easter Sun). The faithful are encouraged to increase their works of mercy and decrease their self-indulgence. It begins on Ash Wednesday, which is 40 days (minus Sundays) before the Triduum. Ash Wednesday So called because it invokes the ancient practice of covering ...


11

The practice of Lent is hardly unique to the Catholic church. It pre-dates the major church schisms. The practice today involves somewhat different implementations in different traditions. Some are much more developed than others, but the general idea is the same. It is impossible to draw up a list of traditions which do or do not participate, because ...


9

Here's the Catholic Lenten Cliffnotes. I see I've been beaten to the punch at answering, but what the heck. Mardi Gras is some sort of French meaning Fat Tuesday. It's called that because the next day is Ash Wednesday Ash Wednesday (today) is the beginning of Lent. It is a precept of the church that Catholics are supposed to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good ...


9

The word Lent itself is derived from the Anglo-Saxon word meaning "Spring," and another word which also was the word for "March," the month in which the majority of Lent falls. Fr. Saunders writes: "Since the earliest times of the Church, there is evidence of some kind of Lenten preparation for Easter. For instance, St. Irenaeus (d. 203) wrote to Pope ...


9

It's actually kind of a contradiction. Which isn't surprising as Christ was a sign which would be contradicted (see Luke 2:34). Purple is a kingly color, which is why they put it on Jesus to mock Him. Purple is also, or has become, the penitential color for the Church, it is also the color worn and used to decorate churches during Advent. Purple is ...


8

Canon Law 1251 says: Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays [...] (emphasis mine). In other words it is to be determined by the bishops exactly what constitutes abstinence. The bishops of Quebec can simply state that beaver meat is OK to eat on days of abstinence. They ...


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I think you may be confusing the terms a little. There's a simple solution to your question. Easter is the joyful celebration of Christ's resurrection. Lent is the forty-day* period leading up to Easter. It is a time of penitence and fasting. Many Christians observing the Western-style liturgical calendar (this probably includes your friend) fast in some ...


5

From CatholicEducation.com's history of Lent: Since the earliest times of the Church, there is evidence of some kind of Lenten preparation for Easter. For instance, St. Irenaeus (d. 203) wrote to Pope St. Victor I, commenting on the celebration of Easter and the differences between practices in the East and the West: "The dispute is not only about the ...


4

"Tyrian purple" as it is called and often referred to as "Royal purple" was often reserved for the very wealthy and royalty, essentially the 'elite' of society. The Romans placed an extremely high value on the dye as it was extracted from sea snails, therefore not easily obtained. Christ was often referred as being "clothed in humility." He came from a ...


3

I know very little about the Orthodox church, but I am familiar with Lenten practices of other churches. Lent is not a time for giving up things which are sinful. Things which are sinful are bad for you, and should be 'given up' all the time. In other words if movies (or music) 'perpetuate sinful activity', then they should be avoided at all times, not ...


3

Richard Foster identifies 6 traditions of the church: Contempative Holiness Charismatic Social Justice Evangelical Incarnational Of these, the traditional Lent celebration is most likely to be practiced by Christians who identify with holiness or who pursue "an ever fuller life of sacrificial, self-giving love". According to the gospels, Jesus began his ...


2

I would suggest that most of this comes from imitation of Catholic traditions. The Catholic Church has a rich tradition of symbolism, and included in that tradition is the use of vestment colors. Liturgical colors have reference in Biblical traditions, however...the only color worn by clergy until the 4th century was white. The first mention of different ...


2

I'd like to add some comments from a Protestant who lived in New Orleans for 4 years. I like the idea of Lent as a time to reflect on what Christ's sacrifice means to us, and a way to draw closer to Him as we approach the celebration of His resurrection, and I have used this in church settings. Unfortunataly, for some it is merely an outward ritual that does ...


2

As DJClayworth wrote, nowadays it's not a strict rule what you can eat in lent. But in Middle Ages, there were strict rules about it. All fish were allowed. But fish were not defined as today, but as "all water animals", including a beaver or a capybara. Molluscs were permitted too - thats why monks (some order had to fast for most of the year as others ...


2

This page (Lent 101 from the UMC) gives a guide to Lent from a Methodist perspective. It is very similar to other protestant traditions. Lent is a time for fasting and prayer, but fasting means different things to different people/denominations. From the page I linked to above: FASTING: Some people have been known to go without food for days. But ...


2

is the intention to add fish to the diet or to remove all other meats from the diet? The answer is "Neither". The intention is to remind you of your need for, and dependence on God. Abstaining from meat is a specific example of the teaching on Abstinence. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains the purpose of abstinence in general as follows: ...


1

I'm Catholic, but I don't know what a Maronit is. One thing about fasting that people often forget is the reason we do it in the first place. If you just do it because it is the rules, it will not benefit you at all. Sundays and feast days are not actually part of Lent, so you don't have to fast. I have not heard anything about not drinking water. I would ...


1

Historically in the Roman Catholic Church, operas were abstained during Lent. Since Italians loved their opera so much, they allowed Handel to write his oratorio, Messiah, to get satisfy that need. Over time, how people fast and abstain during Lent seems to have lessened. I believe that efforts are put into works of love are emphasized rather than just ...


1

Apostle Paul For the time will come ... they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables. (2 Timothy) Sixth Ecumenical Council - canon 51 This holy and ecumenical synod altogether forbids those who are called “players,” and their “spectacles,” as well as the exhibition of hunts, and the theatrical dances. If ...


1

I was baptized Orthodox in infancy and this is the first time I see this mentioned. No doubt it is good practice, but I've never seen any other Orthodox here avoid films or music during Lent. There's nothing wrong with pleasure as far as I'm aware; it is only sinful acts that tie you to this world that are to be avoided and most of them are accompanied with ...


1

According to the edit, the essential question is why the Church prescribes a specific penitential action (abstaining from meat) on specific days, rather than just telling us to do penance (our own way). I think the reason for being so specific is that, although a general exhortation to do penance would be followed by some people, it would fail for a great ...



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