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7

The commonly held understanding is partially correct, but overstated. In reality, the semantic range of the words is broader. Agape It is true that the words ἀγαπάω (agapaó) and ἀγάπη (agapé) came to mean something like "the highest form of love," but this was primarily due later Christian usage of the term. At the time of the New Testament's writing, ...


6

The first major Christian theologian to write primarily in Latin was Tertullian (155–240): his association with a heretical movement is all that prevents him from being universally considered the first of the "Latin Fathers." Jerome provides a brief summary of his early life: Tertullian the presbyter, now regarded as chief of the Latin writers after ...


6

It may be helpful first to understand exactly what is mean by the word "vain." The NOAD defines vain as "producing no result, useless" and "having no meaning or likelihood of fulfillment." The use of God's name is usually reserved for prayer. Calling upon God is meant to have some kind of effect, but only if the caller is penitent and sincere. If the use ...


3

I served as an Elder in the LDS church as a missionary. While I didn't serve a foreign mission, my brother and my father (the first in his family to join the church) did. It's been mentioned several times in responses that in order to understand many of doctrines and principles of the LDS church all stem off of the belief that Joseph Smith was a prophet and ...


3

I work at the Missionary Training Center and my boss often speaks of when officials from the Army's language school came to study our curriculum to try and figure out how our missionaries learned languages so fast. (Below are links of two people's personal stories confirming this.) One big factor is that they are taught in total immersion from day one and as ...


2

You can say the Lords name in many languages with out it being in vain or offensive. LDS consider any use of the Lords name that does not show Him proper respect to be in vain. In English there are several cus phrases and expressions which encorperate the Lord's name in it's various forms, but are used to verbally express anger, frustration, or disbelief. ...


2

The Latin Vulgate, which was translated by St. Jerome from Hebrew and Greek originals, used -as rather than -ah as a suffix for certain Hebrew names (apparently those ending in -yah in Hebrew). The choice was apparently made because -as is a relatively common Greek and Latin word ending—Greek and Latin, being highly inflected languages, generally ...



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