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37

The first instance of sarcasm that jumps into my mind is 1 Kings 18:27, where Elijah is taunting the prophets of Baal because their sacrifice is not burning up (they were having a sort of contest). The NET renders the verse: "At noon Elijah mocked them, 'Yell louder! After all, he is a god; he may be deep in thought, or perhaps he stepped out for a ...


16

At the time of Jesus, and even for many centuries before, Aramaic was the vernacular or common everyday language. The Tanakh is mostly in Hebrew (in particular, the Torah) but there are a few Aramaic sections - notably, in Daniel. Hebrew was therefore the "high" language of religion but Aramaic was the "low" language of normal life. (Hellenized Jews would ...


16

In my opinion, Paul provides the best example. Here he is, in Galatians, having just given his opinion on circumcision (not necessary for Christians), then giving his opinion on those who insist on it for salvation: As for those agitators, I wish they would go the whole way and emasculate themselves! Galatians 5:12 In other words, don't stop at the ...


11

Oftentimes, the simplest answer is the correct one. So here's the obvious answer: He spoke and wrote in Hebrew because he was dealing with Hebrew-speaking people at the moment. Had God spoken to them in English, Latin, or Chinese, they would not have understood him! God, being omniscient, knows all human languages. This means that he has no trouble ...


10

In 1st Kings 22, Kings Ahab and Jehoshaphat were being counseled by false prophets to go to war against Syria. Jehoshaphat asked that Ahab send for a prophet of the Lord, and he sent for Micaiah. The man who brought him told him of the other prophecies, and suggested that he should say the same. When Micaiah did answer the same way, Ahab admonished Micaiah ...


10

I served as an LDS missionary for two years and I think it can be predominantly attributed to a few simple things. 8-12 weeks in the Missionary Training Center where you study the language for at least 6-8 hours of the day have a big effect. We had experienced teachers that also went through the learning process. After a few weeks of study, we were asked ...


9

Jesus Christ spoke Aramaic. In Mark 5:41, we see Jesus saying "Talitha Cumi." This is Aramaic. Aramaic was the language of first century Israel. Not Greek. Many scholars try to give the false impression that Greek was the language of first century Israel. Let me give you the historical evidences from Josephus. Jewish Historian Josephus wrote: "I have ...


9

I have heard the following two examples of Jesus being sarcastic: The Syrophoenician Woman [A] woman whose daughter had an unclean spirit heard about [Jesus], and came and fell down at his feet. The woman was a Greek, by race a Phoenician from Syria. And she started asking him to drive the demon out of her daughter. He responded to her like this: "Let ...


9

Your premise that other names are said the same across languages is simply not correct. Lots of writing systems and spoken sounds don't have one-to-one equivalents in other languages, and over time it is quite common for names to morph to things that are easier to write or say. Sometimes the name will be spelled the same but pronounced locally, then somebody ...


9

Essentially, no: there is no language specified for religious use in Christianity. From the early days of the Church, there was variety in religious language. The Western Church primarily spoke Latin (the vernacular) while the Eastern Church spoke Greek (again, the vernacular). Various churches have languages that have special status, especially for ...


7

One case could be in 2 Corinthians 12:13. Paul is writing to the Corinthians and mentions that he hasn't been a burden to them, presumably financially, but has labored among them nonetheless. For in what were you less favored than the rest of the churches, except that I myself did not burden you? Forgive me this wrong! 2 Corinthians 12:13 ESV The ...


7

Depends on the intent of the speaker. Do they say it with gratitude and in recognition of God? Who could find fault with that? It would not be vain then. But, if it is said without such a sentiment, it is vain.


7

By being made in the image of God, God granted man one of his attributes- namely the ability to communicate. As a God in communion and relationship with himself ("let us create man in our image Gen 1.26) the power of speech and language would have been understood to merely be part of that Imago Dei. Furthermore, the fact that Adam was given the job of ...


6

Of the three types of love you mention, agape and phileo are found in the Bible. The third one, eros, is not in the Bible. There's one often-cited passage that nicely displays both agape (ἀγαπᾷς) and phileo (φιλῶ, φιλεῖς). I'll show it in both English and Greek, highlighting the words meaning love. John 21:15-17 (ESV) 15 When they had finished ...


5

New Testament scholars have no doubt that Matthew was written in Greek. Certainly, it was attributed to the apostle Matthew in the second century, but before this the book was anonymous. By laying the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke in parallel and reading them synoptically ('with the same eye') in Greek, scholars have established that Matthew and Luke ...


5

I have not read the letter in full and have no idea what it is about but I have read so many volumes of old English theology that the language comes easy to me. I think 'conciliating their affections' is straightforward. It means pacifying their holy sense. The context is in reproof. While reproving someone's wrong you also satisfy their sense of ...


5

There is a plethora of evidence that Hebrew was a living language in the Land at the time of Christ and used by the common people. It is called Mishnaic Hebrew in the grammars and encyclopedias. Mishnaic Hebrew was very well known in the first century and was distinguished from Aramaic in such works as the Letter of Aristeas and Josephus. See below for more ...


5

The prophecies of Daniel are chiefly written in Aramaic, thereby providing a non-Hebrew example of a revelation, ergo God spoke to Daniel in a language other than Hebrew. If they were first written in Aramaic by an Aramaic and Hebrew speaker (The Book of Daniel is actually written using both languages in different chapters), then it seems a stretch to argue ...


5

Dogmatically no, there are no a holy language in global-christianity to do services or to speak in. There was a heresy called Three-Language heresy, according to which it was said that the Christian church has only three languages to use in church: Hebrew (not Aramaic), Greek, and Latin. This "dogma" was based on the bible words [Luk 23:38 kjv]: 38 And ...


4

He means the same thing as "the old covenant" (Judaism), but stated in the language of dispensationalism, which classifies the different timeline "slices" of God's plan. We tend to think of it as old covenant/new covenant but if you start getting really anal about it and analyzing "what about before Moses" and "what about after the Rapture" you get a bit ...


4

Mark 16:15 (NIV) He said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation. Matthew 28:19 (NIV) Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, God wants all nations and languages to know Jesus Christ. Acts 1:8 (NIV) But you will receive ...


4

My experience was that those missionaries who are required to learn a foreign language usually spend 8-10 weeks in language training. Some missionaries have previous exposure to the language of their mission. The instruction they receive emphasizes religious vocabulary they will use in teaching and is a limited subset of the full language. It is a ...


3

I would look at passages like Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34 (where Jesus asked God "why have you forsaken me?") and the many psalms that speak of anguish or being forgotten as examples of situations where someone might not feel loved by God, but they are nonetheless very much loved by God. Psalm 13 expresses this sentiment nicely. So I agree with you - love ...


3

The Christian God is given a wide range of names in both the Old Testament and the New Testament. My first thought was to clarify with a generational phrase. You might say "The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob," but that might confuse you with Jews. Also, Since "Allah" is the usual translation for "God" you would risk offending Muslims and breaking the law. ...


3

The Church is referred to as the "Bride of Christ" throughout the NT. It's capitalization simply reflects it's status as a proper noun, subject to capitalization.


2

In English, "Thank God" seems to be an established phrase that is used in certain kinds of situations, regardless of the actual meaning. I can easily see how this could be misused. Then again, there are phrases such as "goodbye", originally meaning "God be with ye". You can't always avoid saying goodbye, but you can mean what you say. That said, there's no ...


2

I agree with Caleb, just to elaborate a little: Languages don't always have the same sounds. When people who grew up with one language try to learn another, they often have problems with sounds that are used in the new language but not in their native language. For example, Chinese people trying to learn English often say "r" rather than "l", hence all the ...


2

Michal despised David for dancing at the return of the ark. She sarcastically refers to his behavior as "glorious" in 2 Samuel 16:20 (KJV): Then David returned to bless his household. And Michal the daughter of Saul came out to meet David, and said, How glorious was the king of Israel to day, who uncovered himself to day in the eyes of the ...


2

When Jesus was on earth, Palestine had become, to a considerable extent, a polyglot, or multilingual, region. There is solid evidence that the Jews still retained their use of Hebrew, but Aramaic and Koine were also spoken. Latin, too, appeared on official inscriptions of the Roman rulers of the land (Joh 19:20) and was doubtless heard from Roman soldiers ...


2

It's hard to know for certain, but there are very good reasons to believe all four gospels were written in Greek. However, according to the earliest Christian tradition, Matthew was written in Hebrew. Papias, an early second century bishop and a disciple of the Apostle John, is our earliest witness to the tradition that Matthew was the author of this ...



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