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8

For most Protestants this is a matter of semantics. Protestants know full well that Catholics call Mary, the "Blessed Mother." They also know that if you ask a Catholic "Is Mary blessed?" They would surely answer "Yes, indeed she is." But the Catholic should understand that the Protestant, in general, would also answer the same. Mary is blessed. Mary ...


6

The KJV uses judge, whereas the others use 'Defend', 'relieve', 'take up the cause of'. The use of the word judge in the KJV relates ushering them judgments, similar to a court of law. Not all judgments are punishment, however. If you were taking someone to court and won, the judge would rule in your favor. Similarly, when judgments in every day life are ...


6

The biggest problem with the KJV is that no one is fluent in its language any more. It simply is not written in an English anyone speaks today. When you read the KJV the problem isn't words you don't know - you can go look them up in a dictionary like you do any other words you haven't read before. The problem isn't complicated sentences or strange word ...


6

In this passage Paul is quoting from Psalm 32. The King James Version in both cases uses derivatives of the verb to impute. However, other well-respected more modern versions of the Bible do not translate it this way e.g. the NIV or the NRSV. There is a less common meaning of the word impute meaning "to assign a value to" which is used in finance. In this ...


6

As a matter of fact, it appears from two etymological entries (in Etymonline.com) that "James" comes not from "Joshua" but from "Jacob": masc. proper name, name of two of Christ's disciples, late 12c. Middle English vernacular form of Late Latin Jacomus (source of Old French James, Spanish Jaime, Italian Giacomo), altered from Latin Jacobus (see Jacob). ...


5

Another piece of evidence for "No, it's merely a coincidence" is that the Douay-Rheims translation, which is a Catholic translation slightly earlier than the Protestant King James translation, also uses "James" to translate the name of the author of this epistle.


3

The most important thing when interpreting a passage is the context: John 8:21-23 ESV So he [Jesus] said to them [Pharisees] again, “I am going away, and you will seek me, and you will die in your sin. Where I am going, you cannot come." So the Jews said, “Will he kill himself, since he says, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come’?” He said to them, “You ...


2

Metaphors are Rooted in Context In comparing these two passages, consider the context. In John 8:23, Jesus is comparing people to himself. By this comparison, we are all “from beneath.” Jesus was human, but he wasn’t only human. We are only human. In 1 John 4:5-6, John is comparing believers to false prophets and antichrists. The believers are from God ...


1

Heaven can mean several things: The abode of God/angels/righteous The firmament (sky) State of utmost happiness These are related concepts, and even in ancient languages, these meanings are conflated. When heaven and hell are used together, #1 or #3 make the most sense. When heaven and earth are used together, #2 probably makes the most sense. So ...


1

Romans 4:8 Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin. "impute" = logizomai = to take an inventory, that is, estimate (literally or figuratively): - conclude, number, reason, reckon, suppose Alternate translations; Weust - Spiritually prosperous is the man to whose account the Lord does not in any case put sin. Amplified - Blessed and ...


1

This is basically a very poetic way to say; "Blessed is the man who is saved by God's Grace." Paul is teaching the Romans about the Grace of God. In chapters 4-8, Paul uses Abraham as an example to show that individuals were not justified through obedience to the law of Moses—they were justified through faith in God’s promises. Since Abraham lived centuries ...


1

John 8:23 states: But he continued, "You are from below; I am from above. You are of this world; I am not of this world. Oh wait, what's right before that: This made the Jews ask, "Will he kill himself? Is that why he says, 'Where I go, you cannot come'?" So let's grammatically simplify that: "The Jews are from below..." Even Earlier ...


1

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly referred to as the "Mormons" or "LDS") use the KJV. For verification see Scriptures.LDS.org



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