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10

Alright, here's the non-trivial answer. The idea is that we are all guilty. It's pretty hard to deny this one: Romans 3:23 (NIV) for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God Furthermore, while we are all guilty of sin, the punishment for this sin is death: Romans 6:23a (NIV) For the wages of sin is death If we go on in Romans 3, we ...


10

Essentially it boils down to that we are saved by grace alone, but that salvation results in such a change of heart that good works must result. From the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Salvation (all emphasis mine): 27.The Catholic understanding also sees faith as fundamental in justification. For without faith, no justification can take place. ...


9

Justification - being declared perfect, a single act of Grace by God to the repentant sinner Sanctification - the process of being made perfect, a day by day activity of God and the Christian working in partnership Glorification - becoming perfect, the moment when the struggle is over, heaven is entered and God completes his masterpiece: You. Relevant ...


7

James 2:14-26 answers your question perfectly. Faith is shown through works. I've included the excerpt below *. Symbolically, sin can be likened to nakedness, whereas clean white robes represent good deeds which are obviously tied with faith. Revelation 19:8 8 She has been permitted to dress in fine (radiant) linen, dazzling and white—for the fine ...


5

According to most independent, fundamentalist Baptists, (and to the best of my knowledge, the groups that you mentioned) justification is a one-time event that happens at the moment of conversion, when a sinner repents on his or her sins and puts their faith in Christ for salvation. This would be in line with a Calvinist view. Justification is a result of ...


5

First to understand the background to the story that Luther recalls,  Luther used to hate Romans 1:17. He struggled with this verse in particular, and the phrase 'God's righteousness' in particular, because he always read it in the sense which it was preached by the Catholic theologians at the time. At that time this verse was understood as the "formal or ...


4

As it's been preached to me, justice, here, refers to God's faithfulness to His own promises. It does not refer to giving us what we deserve, which would be Hell. Toward us, justice would necessarily mean Hell. Instead, "Just" refers to the fact that He has promised to forgive us through the cleansing power of Christ's blood, as long as we have repented ...


4

How did the old ceremonial sacrifices made atonement? They didn't. Old Testament sacrifice was only able to atone for someone who followed the Mosaic law perfectly... a feat which is beyond any of us, especially as most of us are not Jews, and even if we were the Altar and priests are gone. The whole point of Jesus' sacrifice is that the former ...


4

In nuce: The sanctification is the divine imperative "Ye shall be my people" while justification is the divine indicative "I want to be your God". Luther Martin Luther and later the Lutherans focus on the doctrine of justification by faith alone. Is that all? "No" they say – there's also sanctification: true faith is manifested in the works. But as soon ...


3

According to Luther's own testimony, it was after an in depth study of Romans. Romans 1:17 in particular (often called Paul's thesis statement for the book of Romans) says: For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith for faith, as it is written, “The righteous shall live by faith." That last line (from Habakkuk) convinced Luther that no ...


3

Lutherans who hold to their confessions [ http://bookofconcord.org/ ] believe that justification, faith, and baptism go together. A baptized infant believes the Gospel at its baptism. An adult who falls away from faith in Christ which has been given in Baptism and is converted is returning to the promise of the Gospel which has been applied to him in ...


3

I should preface this answer by pointing out that Catholics and non-Catholic Christians may not mean the same thing at all when they each say the word "faith". When a Catholic says "faith" in a context like this, he means free assent to the whole truth that God has revealed (CCC 150). This is not a complete definition of faith but it's an essential part. I'm ...


3

You might want to have the New American Bible sourced, that's our defacto bible, although it's not always as flowery and scholars don't really use it, it contains what we believe. It could give you a concise answer without me elaborating. But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, though testified to by the law and the ...


2

Lastly, I assume that Christians respect the laws of logic and therefore their justifications must also follow these laws. Then you're not really going to get very far. Yes, Christians respect the laws of logic, but we do not respect only the laws of logic. The basis of Christian belief isn't grounded in logic, but in testimony, faith and experience. ...


2

If an earthly judge --charged by the state to uphold the laws of the state in a fair manner and himself known to be a good and upright judge-- were to knowingly acquit a guilty party we would rage against him. The key here is that God is not only the judicial branch, but also the executive and legislative. When a judge presides over a criminal trial, ...


2

The key consideration is the definition of justice. Does justice necessitate punishment or restoration? If I steal $100 from someone, I don't need to be physically beaten. If I repay the amount--or even 7 times the amount--the offended party is restored. If another person pays that amount on my behalf, the offended party is still restored and would have ...


2

In the Methodist tradition, a person is justified when they accept the grace God has given them, and make a decision to follow his will rather than their own. Though justification by itself is not a process, it is the beginning of the process of sanctification, in which we work with God to transform us into the people God intended us to be. This is, as far ...


2

The formulation of this question is broad as has been noted, but I will answer this as best I can. We justify our beliefs based on a series of foundational beliefs that require faith, but then have logical outcomes and structures that follow. The book of Romans does an excellent job laying out these basics and their implications. As such, I have found that ...


2

Ok here is my stab at this rather important question which goes deep into the Christian faith. Let me start with these verses: Romans 6:23 New King James Version (NKJV) For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 5:12 New King James Version (NKJV) Therefore, just as through one man sin ...


2

Why Protestants see themselves as being able to break out of the cycle of sin through their personal affirmation that Jesus is their Personal Savior is more or less a mystery to Catholics. Why Catholics think the mere act of eating what appears to be a piece of Bread can renew their life within them and give them a share in Sanctifying Grace is a more or ...


2

The Essence of Justice Justice is served when the penalty for an offense is paid. For every crime, there is an appropriate penalty. We talk about this as having "paid one's debt to society", by a fine or imprisonment or whatever the sentence dictates. If someone were to be convicted of theft, the sentence may well be simply restitution of the amount of ...


1

Is salvation achieved by faith alone, or does it in fact require some works? Basically works are evidential as opposed to causative. The person who mentioned James chapter two brings up an important comparison. The subject being discussed in Matthew is mistaken assurance of salvation. Even John the Baptist brought this up; Luke 3:8 Bring forth ...


1

“Not everyone who says to Me, .. ....but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter." What is the Father's will? Does the Father's will exclude " .. prophesying, casting out demons, ..... performing miracles" in the name of Jesus? The works of those who do not qualify to enter do not seem evil at all in themselves. They ...


1

I think John 6:40 addresses "the will of God" that Jesus brings up in Matt 7.21-23 in a satisfying way: John 6:40 (NASB) For this is the will of My Father, that everyone who beholds the Son and believes in Him will have eternal life, and I Myself will raise him up on the last day.”


1

I would argue there is no synergism whatsoever in justification. The natural man, the Bible points out, is not sick and needing a doctor. He is dead and needs resurrection. Dead people don't raise themselves. They need to be raised (passive voice very intentional here). Therefore, the Holy Spirit must raise people from the dead and give them a new heart. ...


1

Not everything that is true can be logically proven. Think about interpersonal relationships and your feelings for another person. If you contend that all of your feelings for other people can be based on or explained by the laws of logic, I would assume you've never been in love. I can't really speak for other traditions, but the Evangelical Protestant ...


1

I could tell you how I justify my belief (and it is based on logic, which is based on assumptions), but it wouldn't provide a universal answer worthy of a StackExchange site. What makes sense to me may resonate with a lot of Christians, or very few, or none. In all honesty, I probably sound like a fool to the majority of people, yet to me, my reason for ...



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