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The theological problem is to explain why Jesus apparently trusted Judas, when he ought to have known better. There are a lot of possible answers! Some have tried to find symbolic or exemplary meaning in his actions - a lesson for the future Church. Others have centered the discussion around the character of Jesus, perhaps reaching similar conclusions for ...


6

As you already stated, Judas (Strong's g2455) is simply a variation of the name Judah. Iscariot (Strong's g2469) translates to "man of Kerioth." Kerioth is one of the cities listed in Joshua chapter 15 as the allotment of the Promised Land for the tribe of Judah. So there doesn't seem to be a literal meaning behind the name, other than likely belonging to ...


4

Just because it was already prophesied, does not mean that Judas did not make a conscious choice. A man can most definitely choose to be used by Satan or by the Holy Spirit. Judas, by his actions, was already choosing, as he was choosing to steal from the purse.(John 12:6) This showed that even though he was with Jesus, the Holy Spirit was not working within ...


4

Judas Iscariot was one of Jesus closest followers, a member of his innermost circle of twelve disciples who he trusted with his secrets and who shared in his ministry. He wasn't just a random guy who showed the soldiers where to go. He was actually Jesus' treasurer. This is emphasised in the kiss given by Judas during the betrayal - it was a sign of deep ...


4

Judas Iscariot was not predestined to betray Jesus, and he had a choice in the matter. Consider Psalm 41:9: “The man at peace with me, in whom I trusted, who was eating my bread, has magnified his heel against me.” (NWT) Notice that the prophecy does not specify which close associate of Jesus it would be. Jehovah God knew that the Devil had used David’s ...


2

Answer: Judas Iscariot indeed betrayed Jesus willfully and also had a chance to repent. Jesus deliberately chose a devil: It seems to appear that Jesus deliberately chose Judas to be one of the 12 disciples, knowing that he was a devil. John 6:70-71 (NIV) Then Jesus replied, “Have I not chosen you, the Twelve? Yet one of you is a devil!” (He meant ...


1

I believe another option is equally possible: that Jesus didn't know Judas was a thief (or that he would later become a thief if he wasn't one originally), and that he wouldn't necessarily have been in a position to "ought to know better" when he chose him as a disciple. And even further, I believe that Jesus might not have known much at all about any of the ...



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