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6

Here are some things to help clarify this situation. First, "his disciples" does not always refer to the Twelve. It can refer to a much larger number, including "the seventy" who Jesus sends out to spread the message. Matthew in particular usually refers to "The Twelve" or "the Apostles" when he is talking about the smaller group and "the disciples" can ...


3

Matthew 27:3 says that the impetus for Judas' suicide was seeing him be condemned, rather than seeing him being executed or anything else. Jesus' interactions with Pilate, including the possibility of his being freed, are narrated afterwards. Although the gospels do jump forwards and back in time, I take the explicit description of Judas' remorse being ...


3

The best answer comes Scripturally. Today, the painters of the Middle Ages have given us a picture of Jesus as a grand, handsome man. In fact, the Bible tells us the opposite - Jesus was very plain and normal looking. Let's look at some verses to support this. Emphasis added. Isaiah 53:2 (ESV) tells us the Messiah wouldn't be "beautiful" on the outside: ...


3

It is difficult to believe that Judas Iscariot would not have known the priests intended to have Jesus killed. After all, their willingness to pay thirty silver coins, a small fortune at a time when peasants generally only used the lesser bronze coins, was clear evidence of foul intent. However, Matthew's Gospel portrays Judas as suffering considerable ...


2

The betrayal by Judas appears in chapter 26 of the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 14 of Mark, and chapter 22 of Luke. In all three the decision of Judas is portrayed rather suddenly. Matthew and Mark move straight from the story of Jesus' anointing at Bethany to the story of the betrayal: "Amen, I say to you, wherever this gospel is proclaimed in the whole ...


2

Keep in mind that this event coincided with the Passover. There would have been many people in Jerusalem. Finding one person was not an easy task. There also would have been many rabbis, each with dozens of followers/disciples. Even if the Jewish leaders what Jesus looked like, and where he was (and how could they know his precise location without some ...


1

While not a universalist, I can posit that a universalist inerrantist would principally invoke the classification of hyperbole, and say that for someone to abandon such apostolic potential to enter the messianic community was for the individual ever so tragic. Logically to never have been born, at least if it meant to never have been conceived, could never ...


1

I have heard from several old parishioners at my Roman Catholic church that St. James (the greater) was so visually similar to his cousin Jesus that only people very close to them could tell the difference between the two, and thus the kiss of Judas was necessary to identify the correct man. I can't find any corroborating sources online, but I've heard this ...



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