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20

It's something you probably don't think about much, but we have reason to believe that Jesus really wasn't all that distinctive in his appearance. John 8:58-59 58 Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Before Abraham was, I am. 59 Then took they up stones to cast at him: but Jesus hid himself, and went out of the temple, going ...


19

The theological problem is to explain why Jesus apparently trusted Judas, when he ought to have known better. There are a lot of possible answers! Some have tried to find symbolic or exemplary meaning in his actions - a lesson for the future Church. Others have centered the discussion around the character of Jesus, perhaps reaching similar conclusions for ...


16

This is generally explained as two different details of the same event being the emphisis of the record. Both accounts tell of a suicide. One specifically mentions hanging, the other doesn't mention anything about cause of death but does mention his "falling". These can readily be reconciled through natural causes either by something going wrong in the ...


15

Assuming that the 30 pieces of silver are the tetradachmas that Thayer suggests, the total weight of the 30 pieces of silver would be 15 troy ounces, or something not too far from 1 pound of english measure. (Not that most Europeans would need the equivalent, but its roughly 466 grams). Per this source, 1 troy ounce of silver, trading on May 20, 2013, is $...


15

It's quite possible that both happened: he hanged himself, and when he was found and cut down, (which might have been some time later, long enough for the decay process to begin,) his body burst open with a predictable display of gore.


13

Jesus makes the same point when he is being arrested. He certainly could have been seized anytime without Judas's help. Mark 14:48-49 (ESV) 48 And Jesus said to them, "Have you come out as against a robber, with swords and clubs to capture me? 49 Day after day I was with you in the temple teaching, and you did not seize me. But let the Scriptures be ...


13

In many languages today there is the equivalent of the English word "acquire." Like in Russian "priobrel" means acquire - in contrast "buy" in Russian would be kupit. in Azerbaijani language for "buy" we use a word "almaq" which has many meanings like buy, take, gain. and so this word acquire in the original Greek does not necessarily mean that someone put ...


11

The ESV Study Bible includes this note about the purchase of the property in the Acts account: That is, the field was acquired indirectly by Judas, through the agency of the chief priests. As Matt. 27:3–7 records, Judas brought the 30 pieces of silver back to the chief priests and elders. The chief priests then purchased the potter’s field with Judas’s ...


9

You have to remember the time period. Back then they didn't have photographs. In fact, paper and horseshoes were still new inventions. The soldiers that were sent to capture him weren't his disciples, so they wouldn't know his face, only his reputation. As to how he betrayed him: Upon coming up to Jesus with the soldiers he kissed him. Matthew 26:...


9

Here are some things to help clarify this situation. First, "his disciples" does not always refer to the Twelve. It can refer to a much larger number, including "the seventy" who Jesus sends out to spread the message. Matthew in particular usually refers to "The Twelve" or "the Apostles" when he is talking about the smaller group and "the disciples" can ...


8

There is good reason to believe that we will not see Judas in heaven. Jesus spoke of His betrayer with these words: The Son of Man goes as it is written of him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been better for that man if he had not been born.” Matthew 26:24 ESV As @Paul A Clayton noted in this comment, John 17:12 ...


8

"Predestination" It is not that Arminians argue "against" predestination - that would be silly, since the term comes from Scripture; Arminians would have to cross out a whole bunch of verses in their Bibles if that were the case. Clearly "predestination" is a reality. The question is, what does that mean, and how does that work? In general, Calvinists ...


7

Why are you assuming a one to one correspondence? The Greek here says "y'all" will judge them. The idea is that collectively you will bear witness against all of Israel. In Greek, the verse is: ἵνα ἔσθητε καὶ πίνητε ἐπὶ τῆς τραπέζης μου ἐν τῇ βασιλείᾳ μου, * καὶ καθήσεσθε ἐπὶ θρόνων τὰς δώδεκα φυλὰς κρίνοντες τοῦ Ἰσραήλ. κρίνοντες is a verb (to judge ...


7

Luke 22:2-6 KJV And the chief priests and scribes sought how they might kill him; for they feared the people. Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve. And he went his way, and communed with the chief priests and captains, how he might betray him unto them. And they were glad, and covenanted to give him ...


7

Just because it was already prophesied, does not mean that Judas did not make a conscious choice. A man can most definitely choose to be used by Satan or by the Holy Spirit. Judas, by his actions, was already choosing, as he was choosing to steal from the purse.(John 12:6) This showed that even though he was with Jesus, the Holy Spirit was not working within ...


7

I think it's necessary to separate this question into two parts: Why did Judas need to lead the mob to Jesus? and Why did Judas need to kiss Jesus to identify him? I will attempt to answer the first question. Some possible explanations for the second question can be found here: http://hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/16864/why-did-judas-betray-...


6

As you already stated, Judas (Strong's g2455) is simply a variation of the name Judah. Iscariot (Strong's g2469) translates to "man of Kerioth." Kerioth is one of the cities listed in Joshua chapter 15 as the allotment of the Promised Land for the tribe of Judah. So there doesn't seem to be a literal meaning behind the name, other than likely belonging to ...


5

Interesting question! The Greek words used here are huois tes apoleias "houis" The Strongs number for this is G5207. Looking at the Vines entry, this definitely means "son". This can mean both "male offspring" or, more generically, "descendant". "tes" Strong G3588. This word means "of the". It's just a very simple word. "apoleias" Strong G684. ...


4

John Wesley, in his explanatory notes on John 17, says, "The son of perdition signifies one that deservedly perishes; as a son of death, 2 Samuel 12:5; children of hell, Matthew 23:15, and children of wrath, Ephesians 2:3, signify persons justly obnoxious to death, hell, wrath. Psalms 109:8." To say someone deserves to perish is not the same as saying they ...


4

Only the Holy Spirit anoints offices in the church with miraculous gifts. It is best to think of 'gifts' as temporary and associated with a calling to an office and sanctification as permanent calling to salvation'. Even those sanctified by faith may not be given unusual gifts unless called to an external office requiring those externally anointed abilities. ...


4

Judas Iscariot was one of Jesus closest followers, a member of his innermost circle of twelve disciples who he trusted with his secrets and who shared in his ministry. He wasn't just a random guy who showed the soldiers where to go. He was actually Jesus' treasurer. This is emphasised in the kiss given by Judas during the betrayal - it was a sign of deep ...


3

Tradition says Jesus was betrayed late Thursday night, was crucified and buried before sundown on Friday. Jesus went to the garden of Gethsemane late in the evening, and prayed there for some time. A reasonable guess would be that it was Midnight to 2 AM by the time Judas led the soldiers there to arrest Jesus. Mark 15:25 says it was "the third hour" when ...


3

This may be difficult to ascertain with any great degree of certainty, but we may be able to get close. The Time of Betrayal If, by the "moment of betrayal", you are referring to the Judas' kiss, then there are a few things we know. We know the disciples were having a hard time staying awake even during the first time Jesus went away to pray, and Jesus ...


3

Judas Iscariot was not predestined to betray Jesus, and he had a choice in the matter. Consider Psalm 41:9: “The man at peace with me, in whom I trusted, who was eating my bread, has magnified his heel against me.” (NWT) Notice that the prophecy does not specify which close associate of Jesus it would be. Jehovah God knew that the Devil had used David’s ...


3

Assuming Affable Geek is right about the Greek, then that would largely explain it. One thing about English, unlike ancient Greek (and many other languages, like Spanish which I know a lot of), is that in English, we use the same word for the second-person singular and second-person plural. In other words, we say "you" whether addressing one person or many. ...


3

The best answer comes Scripturally. Today, the painters of the Middle Ages have given us a picture of Jesus as a grand, handsome man. In fact, the Bible tells us the opposite - Jesus was very plain and normal looking. Let's look at some verses to support this. Emphasis added. Isaiah 53:2 (ESV) tells us the Messiah wouldn't be "beautiful" on the outside: ...


3

It is difficult to believe that Judas Iscariot would not have known the priests intended to have Jesus killed. After all, their willingness to pay thirty silver coins, a small fortune at a time when peasants generally only used the lesser bronze coins, was clear evidence of foul intent. However, Matthew's Gospel portrays Judas as suffering considerable ...


3

I identify as an evangelical universalist. I don't know if you'll find this worthwhile, but here's my take. It sounds an awful lot like a figure of speech to me. If it is, it's best not to draw too many conclusions based on it. (Bart Ehrman left the faith because the mustard seed isn't really the smallest of all seeds.) In support of the figure of speech ...


3

Matthew 27:3 says that the impetus for Judas' suicide was seeing him be condemned, rather than seeing him being executed or anything else. Jesus' interactions with Pilate, including the possibility of his being freed, are narrated afterwards. Although the gospels do jump forwards and back in time, I take the explicit description of Judas' remorse being ...



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