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14

The existing answer provides a learned and fascinating discussion for tracing the interpretative history of Isaiah 52:13-53:12 (often conveniently abbreviated to "Isaiah 53", the so-called "Fourth Servant Song") from roughly the 1st C. CE. Thus, the conclusion... We can ... be confident that first century converts to Christianity did not invent the idea ...


13

First, it should be noted that even if Jews did not view the passage as Messianic before Jesus, that does not prove that it is a invalid interpretation. In Old Testament times, Biblical prophecies were often not recognized until they were fulfilled. That said, let's look at the evidence. Targum Jonathan ben Uziel The Targums are interpretative ...


9

The answer to your question lies in what each religion teaches about who God is. Islam From The Truth About Islam by Dr. David R. Reagan*: God — The Koran asserts that the god of Islam is the God of Christians and Jews (Sura 29:46). Nothing could be farther from the truth.7 The god of Islam, Allah, is most definitely not the God of the Bible. ...


6

Disease in general Most scholars and Biblical commentaries agree that it was a common belief among the Jewish people of Jesus' day that leprosy and sickness in general was caused by sin. In the Old Testament, there are a number of passage that say doctors are of little value: As for you, you whitewash with lies; worthless physicians are you all. (Job ...


6

In Ancient Judaism, preserving and accurately copying the scriptures was a task considered to be of the utmost importance. As such, an official Temple position dedicated to this task was created. Such a scribal position was not unique to Judaism; indeed, many ancient societies had trained professionals whose primary job was to maintain and copy religious ...


5

Yes, Christianity was born out of Judaism. Jesus was, as far as we know, born in Bethlehem, near Jerusalem, and was crucified in Jerusalem and on the third day rose from the dead. Judaism may not have been the first monotheistic religion in the Near East - Zoroastrianism may have a valid claim to that distinction - but it remains monotheistic, as does ...


5

1.The Jewish and Islamic concept of God is the same: one God, one person, one mind.This is same in Talmud, a central text of Rabbinic Judaism written between 200 CE/AD- 500 CE/AD.Thus it is different from the Triune God of Trinitarian Christianity, God as three persons, three minds, co-equal and co-eternal, one in essence, nature, power, action, and will. ...


3

The overall goal of your question (determining if you were "in the right path for my beliefs or not") probably can't be sufficiently answered here as you'll find competing opinions according to different denominations and belief systems. That being said, I can give a rudimentary summary of how each side approaches Paul's writings and let you choose for ...


3

Modern-day Judaism, which is a different religion compared to Judaism before Christ, is based on the Talmud, which they consider a sacred text at least on the level of the Torah (the 1st 5 books of the Bible). Islam is essentially a heretical sect of Christianity founded by Muhammad, who assembled tho Koran from corrupted texts of Christian Holy Scriptures. ...


2

There are inscriptions found in Kuntillet Ajtud and a further inscription found scratched on bedrock in a tomb at Khirbet el-Qom in Judah, that appear to say the goddess Asherah was considered to be the wife of Yahweh. The first of these was discovered in 1975, when Tel Aviv University archaeologist Ze’ev Meshel decided to excavate at remote Kuntillet ‘Ajrud ...


2

The Law, given to Moses on Mt. Sinai, was God's second work intended to make A People for Himself. The first work we know as God's creating man in His image, according to His likeness, in which thus the Word of God was in his heart as it was certainly of God's own heart. For Moses writes in Deuteronomy 30:14, But the word is very near you, in your mouth, ...


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To answer the O.P.’s question directly, there is no ontological difference between Divine Providence and the Holy Spirit. God (or, if you will, the Divine Essence) is identical with His attributes—including Providence—and also with each one of the Persons. (The best exposition of this idea is St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theolgia, I, q. 3, a. 3; and I, q. 39, ...


2

How did Christian movement distinguish itself from Judaism? Early Christians did not try to distinguish themselves as a movement. They had hopes that the rest of the Jews would accept Jesus as their Savior. Such attempts at "branding" are more consistent with modern marketing techniques. The early church was entirely made up of Jews. They were sort of ...


2

They are quite unlike each other. You can read of the fundamentals of the Jewish Passover in Exodus 12. In fundamentalist Christianity, Easter is the celebration of Jesus' resurrection from the dead. You can read of the resurrection benefits for the Christian in 1 Corinthians 15. Wikipedia should have articles on each if you want to be more thorough. I will ...


2

You ask: What did Jesus do regarding the Jews believing that some diseases were sometimes due to sin? There's one passage in particular where explicitly corrects the disciples regarding a man born blind in John 9: As he passed by, he saw a man blind from birth. 2 And his disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born ...


1

Did Paul/Saul teach Christianity with Jewish traditions to Gentiles like what we see in Messianic Judaism today? Early Christianity expected the immanent return of Jesus to establish the kingdom. Acts 1:10-11 And while they looked stedfastly toward heaven as he went up, behold, two men stood by them in white apparel; Which also said, Ye men of ...


1

Actually, he had a specific use for the law for Jew and Gentile alike: 1 Timothy 1:8-10 But we know that the law is good, if a man use it lawfully; Knowing this, that the law is not made for a righteous man, but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and for sinners, for unholy and profane, for murderers of fathers and murderers of ...


1

Judaism has never agreed with the concept of original sin, which is essentially a Western Christian notion, with which the Orthodox Churches also do not agree. According to the Catholic Church, there is an obligation on all Catholics to believe in original sin. Most Protestant denominations follow the Catholic lead in also teaching of original sin, although ...


1

In 70 CE, Second Temple Judaism came to an abrupt and traumatic end, with the destruction of the Temple and the enslavement of many leading Jews. Randall Price says in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 137 (citing Dr. Lawrence Schiffman): Second Temple Judaism can now be seen as a transition period in which the sectarianism and apocalypticism of ...


1

The term "testament" can also be translated as "pact" or "covenant". The notion of a coming new covenant is a completely Jewish one, as it first appears in the prophets (e.g. Isaiah 59.21; Jeremiah 31.31, 32.40; Ezekiel 37.26). Jesus, the Messiah, established this new covenant through his death at his last Passover with his disciples (Mark 14.24; Luke ...



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