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7

Two appendices in The Jewish Annotated New Testament touch on the issue: Greek-speaking Jews in antiquity regularly referred to themselves as Ioudaioi. As an ethnogeographical term, best translated "Judeans," it designates the members of the ethnic group inhabiting the district of Judea, or their descendants wherever they may be. It translates the Hebrew ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


6

The Book of Jashar is mentioned in two places in the Bible: 2 Samuel 1:18 (NASB) and he told them to teach the sons of Judah the song of the bow; behold, it is written in the book of Jashar. Joshua 10:12-13 (NASB) Then Joshua spoke to the Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites before the sons of Israel, and he said in the sight of ...


5

You are assuming that Jewish thought has been monolithic on the subject for 2000 years. Even at the time of Second Temple, they were not. The Rabbinic interpretation in particular, favored oral transmission, making "exegesis" hard to track, but by no means non-literal. All in all, then, rabbinic tradition continued the pattern of translation, but ...


5

There is a plethora of evidence that Hebrew was a living language in the Land at the time of Christ and used by the common people. It is called Mishnaic Hebrew in the grammars and encyclopedias. Mishnaic Hebrew was very well known in the first century and was distinguished from Aramaic in such works as the Letter of Aristeas and Josephus. See below for more ...


4

No, neither the Jews (those left after the northern exile) nor the entirety of the Hebrews (all those of the faith before the northern exile) held to any concept of a trinity. The ancient egyptians had a trinity, but not the Hebrews. In fact, they held to a strict monotheism as taught by scripture. Deuteronomy 6:4 The Scriptures 1998+ (4) Hear, O ...


4

As luck would have it, last year I read the theses of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494), who tried to integrate Kabbalah with a broadly Christian worldview. I don't know how much his approach is typical of later Christian use of Kabbalah - it strikes me as rather idiosyncratic, though I wouldn't be surprised if other writers followed his basic line ...


4

The book the question refers to does not seem to have a correct understanding of the gospel. There is only one gospel which is for both Jews and Gentiles, and Paul clearly taught that. The beginning of Romans (1:18-3:20) shows that everyone, both Jews and Gentiles, are condemned by their sin. At the very end Paul says what he thought the purpose of the law ...


3

I believe the best way to approach this question is to start with the following verse Acts 23:8 (RSVCE) 8For the Sad′ducees say that there is no resurrection, nor angel, nor spirit; but the Pharisees acknowledge them all. Thus some Jews in Jesus' time believed in spirits. When one died, their soul went down to Sheol. All however, did not suffer the ...


3

Taken from Wikipedia, but edited with passages from the NIV, off of Bible Gateway. The New Testament contains references to usury, notably in the Parable of the talents: Well then, you should have put my money on deposit with the bankers, so that when I returned I would have received it back with interest. —Matthew 25:27 So interest was accepted, ...


3

The Catholic and Protestant traditions revere the Lord Prayer, which says in part: Matthew 6:12 "And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors." Immediately after telling His disciples to pray that way, Jesus gives us more details about forgiveness: Matthew 6:14-15 "For if you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also ...


3

At the time of Christ, the largest proponents of the Oral Law were the Pharisees. On multiple occasions, the Pharisees caught Jesus breaking some of the Oral Laws and confronted Him about it in order to discredit His ministry. Jesus responded by calling the Oral Law "traditions of men". He taught that they were not only unnecessary to follow, since they ...


3

It's a fundamental belief of Christianity that the coming of Jesus fulfils the Old Testament law. In other words that the Law was only ever intended to be until the coming of Messiah. Jesus did not therefore abolish or diminish the law. His coming simply marked the end of its original intended purpose. Jesus says as much in Matthew chapter 5 verse 17. ...


2

When Jesus was on earth, Palestine had become, to a considerable extent, a polyglot, or multilingual, region. There is solid evidence that the Jews still retained their use of Hebrew, but Aramaic and Koine were also spoken. Latin, too, appeared on official inscriptions of the Roman rulers of the land (Joh 19:20) and was doubtless heard from Roman soldiers ...


2

Jewish commentators like Rashi, Ibn Ezra, etc. write comments on the Old Testament(Torah). Jews only have the Torah while Christians have one more set of books, the New Testament. Jewish commentators write explanations based on Jewish traditions and oral traditions, some of which are unknown to Christians. There are also Christian Bible commentators. For ...


2

In the Teachings of Jesus and the writings of the Apostles, there is a common theme of the world that represents an established system that is separate from and foreign to Messiah. John 14:16-18 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another co-minister, that he should abide with you into the ages: the Spirit of Truth, whom the world is not ...


2

This is only an indirect answer to part of your question, but I get the feeling that the non-historical part of this apologetic is not being expressed in a satisfying manner, either in your question or in the existing answer. (I just wrote a very long sentence to try and explain it better, but figured that would not help. Let's try by analogy): Today ...


2

Transistor I feel you. I think oftentimes the answer is not clear but many Christians take comfort in believing all of their church's teachings and their apologists' arguments are valid. When I ask questions about the premises or certain details which seem to be contradictory I am often told not that the answer isn't really known or that the answerer ...


2

A Catholic Understanding There are two parts to your question: Can one forgive another for a wrong they have not suffered personally? Can one forgive another if God has not forgiven them? One at a time. Can one forgive another for a wrong they have not suffered personally? If one hasn't suffered a wrong personally, it's not clear that there's anything ...


2

It seems that this question has two points. First, when Christians stopped to practice Jewish traditions. Second, when others stopped to think that they are a Jewish sect. Either part has a strict border. Regarding the first part, I would assume that this is related to the destruction of the Temple when many Christians left Palestine. This event also caused ...


2

In the book of Romans Paul clearly shows that this is a matter for each individual to make up their own mind about. All Christians have freedom from the Mosaic Law, so decide for yourself what you think will help you to practice godliness and be in the best position to serve others. And keep reconsidering it, because it may be wise to change your decision ...


2

The Catholic ought to start with NOSTRA AETATE DECLARATION ON THE RELATION OF THE CHURCH TO NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIONS PROCLAIMED BY HIS HOLINESS POPE PAUL VI ON OCTOBER 28, 1965. In it Pope Paul VI states 3. The Church regards with esteem also the Moslems. They adore the one God, living and subsisting in Himself; merciful and all- powerful, the Creator ...


2

Some people like to say that because the gods of Judaism, Christianity and Islam share a heritage then they're the same God. Other people point to the big doctrinal differences between them to say they're not the same. I have to go with the second group. It's kind of like the difference between The Republic of China and The People's Republic of China: both ...


1

The Nation of Israel at the time Jesus was preaching, was well versed in the Pentateuch, the Prophets and the Psalms, and from those books we find the following Scriptures: Deuteronomy 26:15 KJV Look down from thy holy habitation, from heaven, and bless thy people Israel, and the land which thou hast given us, as thou swarest unto our fathers, a land ...


1

Christianity is based on the Hebrew Bible, but not directly on Judaism. Christians don't accept the Hebrew Bible because Judaism does, but because they have decided for themselves that it is inspired. Judaism accepts the Oral Torah/Mishnah/Talmud etc, but Christians have decided that they do not (as do some Jews for that matter). I can think of three big ...


1

Based upon a few comments, I have copied my blogpost entry. It is an excerpt from my book Our Jewish Roots. When HaShem (God) dictated the Torah to Moses, that Written Law, or Torah She’bi-khetav, made God’s laws known to His people. This Truth, in all its glorious revelation, was to provide the Jewish people with instructions for daily living, how to ...


1

The Law of Moses was part of the Mosaic Covenant. This covenant was between God and Israel, but we should not assume that it would never end. In fact, God spoke to the Jewish people of a new covenant that He would establish. “Behold, days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of ...


1

Judaism only began with the completion of Babylonian Talmud in early sixth century AD. The completion of Babylonian Talmud was around 500 AD (Source - Book "Alfred Edersheim: A Jewish Scholar for the Mormon Prophets" by Marianna Rica, Page 44). Let me give evidences from the Jewish rabbis themselves. Jewish Rabbi Stephen Wise (Formerly Chief Rabbi of ...


1

Yes, John Gill was one Christian scholar who made frequent use of the Jewish commentators.


1

Part of the last paragraph in entry the Pharisees on New Advent has: [T]he extreme faction of the Sadducees, known as the Herodians, was in sympathy with the foreign rulers and pagan culture, and even looked forward to a restoration of the national kingdom under one of the descendants of King Herod. Yet we find the Pharisees making common cause ...



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