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8

The Book of Jashar is mentioned in two places in the Bible: 2 Samuel 1:18 (NASB) and he told them to teach the sons of Judah the song of the bow; behold, it is written in the book of Jashar. Joshua 10:12-13 (NASB) Then Joshua spoke to the Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites before the sons of Israel, and he said in the sight of ...


7

Two appendices in The Jewish Annotated New Testament touch on the issue: Greek-speaking Jews in antiquity regularly referred to themselves as Ioudaioi. As an ethnogeographical term, best translated "Judeans," it designates the members of the ethnic group inhabiting the district of Judea, or their descendants wherever they may be. It translates the Hebrew ...


7

There is a plethora of evidence that Hebrew was a living language in the Land at the time of Christ and used by the common people. It is called Mishnaic Hebrew in the grammars and encyclopedias. Mishnaic Hebrew was very well known in the first century and was distinguished from Aramaic in such works as the Letter of Aristeas and Josephus. See below for more ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


5

1.The Jewish and Islamic concept of God is the same: one God, one person, one mind.This is same in Talmud, a central text of Rabbinic Judaism written between 200 CE/AD- 500 CE/AD.Thus it is different from the Triune God of Trinitarian Christianity, God as three persons, three minds, co-equal and co-eternal, one in essence, nature, power, action, and will. ...


5

While the parallels aren't exact, there are some points that are rather interesting. The Saducees believed in a strict interpretation of the Law as originally written, and rejected religious innovation. It wasn't so much that they didn't believe that there were prophets after Moses as that they didn't hold them to be prophets in quite the same, ...


4

The book the question refers to does not seem to have a correct understanding of the gospel. There is only one gospel which is for both Jews and Gentiles, and Paul clearly taught that. The beginning of Romans (1:18-3:20) shows that everyone, both Jews and Gentiles, are condemned by their sin. At the very end Paul says what he thought the purpose of the law ...


3

I believe the best way to approach this question is to start with the following verse Acts 23:8 (RSVCE) 8For the Sad′ducees say that there is no resurrection, nor angel, nor spirit; but the Pharisees acknowledge them all. Thus some Jews in Jesus' time believed in spirits. When one died, their soul went down to Sheol. All however, did not suffer the ...


3

At the time of Christ, the largest proponents of the Oral Law were the Pharisees. On multiple occasions, the Pharisees caught Jesus breaking some of the Oral Laws and confronted Him about it in order to discredit His ministry. Jesus responded by calling the Oral Law "traditions of men". He taught that they were not only unnecessary to follow, since they ...


3

Taken from Wikipedia, but edited with passages from the NIV, off of Bible Gateway. The New Testament contains references to usury, notably in the Parable of the talents: Well then, you should have put my money on deposit with the bankers, so that when I returned I would have received it back with interest. —Matthew 25:27 So interest was accepted, ...


3

The disparity between those labeling them one way or the other is not due to there being disagreement over what the Sadducees and the Pharisees believed, who they were, or what they were like. Rather, the disparity is caused by a wishy-washy definition of the terms liberal and conservative. The terms liberal and conservative have many different meanings ...


2

This is a little bit based on differing opinions. However, ultra conservatives are typically seen as being concerned about every detail of every part of the Scriptures. The Pharisees appear to have been much more like this. Ultra liberals are often seen as those who readily dismiss many of the teachings of the Scriptures, preferring some passages and ...


2

A Catholic Understanding There are two parts to your question: Can one forgive another for a wrong they have not suffered personally? Can one forgive another if God has not forgiven them? One at a time. Can one forgive another for a wrong they have not suffered personally? If one hasn't suffered a wrong personally, it's not clear that there's anything ...


2

The Law, given to Moses on Mt. Sinai, was God's second work intended to make A People for Himself. The first work we know as God's creating man in His image, according to His likeness, in which thus the Word of God was in his heart as it was certainly of God's own heart. For Moses writes in Deuteronomy 30:14, But the word is very near you, in your mouth, ...


2

In the Teachings of Jesus and the writings of the Apostles, there is a common theme of the world that represents an established system that is separate from and foreign to Messiah. John 14:16-18 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another co-minister, that he should abide with you into the ages: the Spirit of Truth, whom the world is not ...


2

In the book of Romans Paul clearly shows that this is a matter for each individual to make up their own mind about. All Christians have freedom from the Mosaic Law, so decide for yourself what you think will help you to practice godliness and be in the best position to serve others. And keep reconsidering it, because it may be wise to change your decision ...


2

This is only an indirect answer to part of your question, but I get the feeling that the non-historical part of this apologetic is not being expressed in a satisfying manner, either in your question or in the existing answer. (I just wrote a very long sentence to try and explain it better, but figured that would not help. Let's try by analogy): Today ...


2

Transistor I feel you. I think oftentimes the answer is not clear but many Christians take comfort in believing all of their church's teachings and their apologists' arguments are valid. When I ask questions about the premises or certain details which seem to be contradictory I am often told not that the answer isn't really known or that the answerer ...


2

It seems that this question has two points. First, when Christians stopped to practice Jewish traditions. Second, when others stopped to think that they are a Jewish sect. Either part has a strict border. Regarding the first part, I would assume that this is related to the destruction of the Temple when many Christians left Palestine. This event also caused ...


2

Some people like to say that because the gods of Judaism, Christianity and Islam share a heritage then they're the same God. Other people point to the big doctrinal differences between them to say they're not the same. I have to go with the second group. It's kind of like the difference between The Republic of China and The People's Republic of China: both ...


2

The Catholic ought to start with NOSTRA AETATE DECLARATION ON THE RELATION OF THE CHURCH TO NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIONS PROCLAIMED BY HIS HOLINESS POPE PAUL VI ON OCTOBER 28, 1965. In it Pope Paul VI states 3. The Church regards with esteem also the Moslems. They adore the one God, living and subsisting in Himself; merciful and all- powerful, the Creator ...


2

In fairness, it is probably best understood in the opposite direction. Technically, "the Way" - those Jewish followers of Jesus the Christ, were Jewish heretics. The story is better explained here: At what point did Judaism and Christianity diverge? For the continuing saga, you may find this useful: Was Catholicism the first denomination? It should be ...


1

Strange as it may seem, there are people who hold this view currently, and in fact it was actually the doctrine of the Catholic church in the past (I hasten to add, they would not express their doctrine in those terms currently). Proponents of such a view assume (without sufficient evidence imho) two things: Christians are the covenant people of God - the ...


1

The Bible states that we are to "believe" in the Lord in order to have salvation. It is therefore extremely important what God says about himself sot that we can believe it. If we believe in something other than what God said he was, then we do not actually believe in Him. This is why the doctrine of the Trinity is so very important. As A.W. Tozer puts it ...


1

The traditional Catholic Church says that Muslims worship devils not the true God. For all the gods of the Gentiles are devils: Psa 95:5 Pope Callixtus III: “I vow to… exalt the true Faith, and to extirpate the diabolical sect of the reprobate and faithless Mahomet [Islam] in the East.” Pope Eugene IV, Council of Basel, Session 19, Sept. ...


1

The Nation of Israel at the time Jesus was preaching, was well versed in the Pentateuch, the Prophets and the Psalms, and from those books we find the following Scriptures: Deuteronomy 26:15 KJV Look down from thy holy habitation, from heaven, and bless thy people Israel, and the land which thou hast given us, as thou swarest unto our fathers, a land ...


1

Christianity is based on the Hebrew Bible, but not directly on Judaism. Christians don't accept the Hebrew Bible because Judaism does, but because they have decided for themselves that it is inspired. Judaism accepts the Oral Torah/Mishnah/Talmud etc, but Christians have decided that they do not (as do some Jews for that matter). I can think of three big ...


1

Based upon a few comments, I have copied my blogpost entry. It is an excerpt from my book Our Jewish Roots. When HaShem (God) dictated the Torah to Moses, that Written Law, or Torah She’bi-khetav, made God’s laws known to His people. This Truth, in all its glorious revelation, was to provide the Jewish people with instructions for daily living, how to ...


1

Judaism only began with the completion of Babylonian Talmud in early sixth century AD. The completion of Babylonian Talmud was around 500 AD (Source - Book "Alfred Edersheim: A Jewish Scholar for the Mormon Prophets" by Marianna Rica, Page 44). Let me give evidences from the Jewish rabbis themselves. Jewish Rabbi Stephen Wise (Formerly Chief Rabbi of ...


1

The Law of Moses was part of the Mosaic Covenant. This covenant was between God and Israel, but we should not assume that it would never end. In fact, God spoke to the Jewish people of a new covenant that He would establish. “Behold, days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of ...



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