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18

There are two ways to read that. Reading it as an arrogant statement is certainly one, but I think it can also be read exactly the opposite way -- as a sign of humility. Not wanting to name himself in a "me, John, I was there see" way, he simply refers to himself based on his identity in relation to Christ. As a Christian I think this is great way to think ...


14

The internal evidence of the authorship is found in four passages in the Book of Revelation. It is in these four passages that the author refers to himself as "John". Rev 1:1 This is the revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants the things that must happen soon. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John, Rev ...


13

In a case like this, it's best to go back to the original Greek. As jrista pointed out, the key verb in 3:9 is the one your version translates as "continue to", in the greek "ποιέω". This Greek Lexicon gives a lot of translations for this verb, including: to make; with the names of things made, to produce, construct, form, fashion, etc.; to be the ...


11

There's an interesting passage towards the end of the Gospel of John, after Jesus's resurrection: John 21:21-23 21 Peter seeing him saith to Jesus, Lord, and what shall this man do? 22 Jesus saith unto him, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? follow thou me. 23 Then went this saying abroad among the brethren, that ...


10

Revelation 1:9 explicitly states that John was on the island of Patmos when he wrote revelation: I, John, your brother and companion in the suffering and kingdom and patient endurance that are ours in Jesus, was on the island of Patmos because of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus. That he would have been exiled there is common: "Early ...


8

This might be a case where detail is lost in translation? According to one of my bibles, the English Standard Version, the verse 1 John 3:9 is this: No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God's seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God. The word practice there seems to give deeper meaning, and as I ...


6

You're making the mistake of an argument from silence, because in spite of your assertion that "its clear" that Peter, James, and John witnessed more of Jesus' miracles, all we really know for sure is that we have records that Peter, James, and John are reported to have witnessed more miracles than the other disciples. The fact that the other followers of ...


6

In the context of a 1st century pious writer it would have been interpreted as the exact opposite of arrogance, in fact. It is much like Jesus referring to himself as "The Son of Man" instead of saying 'I' or 'me'.


5

John still held the priesthood during that time (as did the three Nephites who were given the same blessing as John), but the function of the priesthood was limited to his particular, ministerial duties. In other words, the fulness of the Priesthood was not active because its keys did not remain on the earth. John was not called to be the President of the ...


4

With respect to the traditional attributions, here's the simple list: Matthew: None Mark: None Luke: Acts John: 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, and Revelation Modern scholarship, which typically rejects the traditionally attributed authors of these books, still generally attributes Luke and Acts to the same author. There is less agreement on the authorship of ...


3

The earliest written tradition placing John in Ephesus comes from Irenaeus, Against Heresies, book 3, chapter 3, section 4. During an explanation of how the apostles passed on teachings to their chosen successors, Irenaeus says: There are also those who heard from him [Polycarp] that John, the disciple of the Lord, going to bathe at Ephesus, and ...


3

I found this by William Barclay in his Daily Study Bible in 17 volumes. This section is from Revelation of John Vol 1; the 1976 United States reprint. http://www.dannychesnut.com/Bible/Barclay/Revelation,%20Part%20I.htm THE AUTHOR OF THE REVELATION (i) The Revelation was written by a man called John. He begins by saying that God sent the visions ...


3

The rapture itself is not described in the Revelation, and for that reason there are three common conceptions as to when it will occur, of which I am sure you are aware. There are however some hints we can use to form our own opinion as to when it will occur in Revelation. As I'm sure you are aware the rapture is a concept formed from being caught up into ...


3

We know from scripture that he was exiled on the Isle of Patmos near the end of his life - reliable understandings of when his epistles and the book of Revelation were penned indicate it was around the year 90 AD. Where he was between ~50AD and 90AD (with 50 being a plausible time for Paul's early writings, and the original disciples/apostles to still be in ...


3

Another note I'd like to point out, as far as the LDS have been given, they do not know of them ordaining anyone to the priesthood after the first century AD (IMO they were either commanded not to or knew something about what time the Lord would command it to be given again). According to the LDS, John and the three Nephites had the priesthood but to mankind ...


3

Doctrine and Covenants Section 7 Revelation given to Joseph Smith the Prophet and Oliver Cowdery, at Harmony, Pennsylvania, April 1829, when they inquired through the Urim and Thummim as to whether John, the beloved disciple, tarried in the flesh or had died. The revelation is a translated version of the record made on parchment by John and hidden up by ...


3

The authorship of the New Testament is a not universally agreed among Biblical scholars. Many would not agree that Matthew, Mark, Luke or John actually wrote the gospels that bear their name. However I'll assume you want a fairly traditional approach if you are teaching youth. There is one thing that is almost universally agreed among scholars and that is ...


2

In Jude 9, we read: But Michael the archangel, when he disputed with the devil and argued about the body of Moses, did not dare pronounce against him a railing judgment, but said, “ The Lord rebuke you!” This is often taught as the body of Moses was taken into heaven. We also know that Elijah ascended in a fiery chariot in a whirlwind: And as they ...


2

According to Author: McConkie, Mark L. Latter-day Saint scriptures speak of a unique class of beings, persons whom the Lord has "translated" or changed from a mortal state to one in which they are temporarily not subject to death, and in which they experience neither pain nor sorrow except for the sins of the world. Such beings appear to have much greater ...


2

Peter and James, we infer, have been resurrected already and have physical bodies. The laying on of hands was performed by physical beings to physical beings. A few references: Peter, James, and Moroni have been resurrected (see Supporting Statement B) John the Baptist is also apparently resurrected


2

As mentioned in previous answers, the appointment of John to remain on the earth to preach the Gospel is analogous to the three Nephite apostles Jesus chose to do the same while visiting America. In fact, He said to them: ...ye have desired the thing which John, my beloved, who was with me in my ministry, before that I was lifted up by the Jews, ...


2

The basis for this teaching is, as noted in another answer, is found in John 21:21-23, where Jesus, speaking to Peter, sidesteps a question regarding John's future death. More direct teaching is found in Doctrine and Covenants 7, where Jesus is quoted as saying: 1 And the Lord said unto me: John, my beloved, what desirest thou? For if you shall ask what ...


2

Aristotle (384-322 BC) talked about zoe versus psyche in his treatise De Anima ("On the Soul"). However, his concept of the mortal and immortal components of the complete human is a bit different than our current understanding. An excerpt from the Catholic Encyclopedia discusses this: For Aristotle, in the case of living natural bodies the vital ...


2

The answer lies in the history of the gospels. All the New Testament gospels were originally anonymous until attributed to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John later in the second century. The Church Fathers looked for clues that might help them decide who probably wrote each of the gospels. In the case of the fourth gospel, the Church Fathers noticed that it never ...


2

Here is a Wikipedia article (poor resource sometimes, I know) that details the origin of the story that Mary lived in Ephesus (or nearby). It appears to start with a nun in Germany named Anne Catherine Emmerich, who was bedridden and reported a series of visions that detailed "the last days of the life of Jesus, and details of the life of Mary, his mother." ...


1

Why did Jesus favor Peter, James and John more than the other disciples? I believe Jesus was doing this in order to 'model the mission'. I'm referring to the Great Commission: 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I ...


1

Revelation 6-8 follows closely the timeline Jesus gave in Matthew 24 on the end-times events and His return. Based on the parallel events, where the Bible interprets itself, we can tell at which point deliverance comes for God's elect (the rapture): Mt 24:5, Rv 6:1-2 -- Mt: False Christs; Rv: First seal (false savior on white horse). Mt 24:6, Rv 6:3-4 -- ...


1

Short answer Yes. Biblical Evidence God created man in his own image: Gen. 1:27 God created man, in the likeness of God made he him: Gen. 5:1 . in the image of God made he man: Gen. 9:6 . Lord went his way, as soon as he had left communing: Gen. 18:33 . I have seen God face to face: Gen. 32:30 . they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet: ...



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