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17

There are two ways to read that. Reading it as an arrogant statement is certainly one, but I think it can also be read exactly the opposite way -- as a sign of humility. Not wanting to name himself in a "me, John, I was there see" way, he simply refers to himself based on his identity in relation to Christ. As a Christian I think this is great way to think ...


12

In a case like this, it's best to go back to the original Greek. As jrista pointed out, the key verb in 3:9 is the one your version translates as "continue to", in the greek "ποιέω". This Greek Lexicon gives a lot of translations for this verb, including: to make; with the names of things made, to produce, construct, form, fashion, etc.; to be the ...


10

The internal evidence of the authorship is found in four passages in the Book of Revelation. It is in these four passages that the author refers to himself as "John". Rev 1:1 This is the revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants the things that must happen soon. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John, Rev ...


9

Revelation 1:9 explicitly states that John was on the island of Patmos when he wrote revelation: I, John, your brother and companion in the suffering and kingdom and patient endurance that are ours in Jesus, was on the island of Patmos because of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus. That he would have been exiled there is common: "Early ...


8

This might be a case where detail is lost in translation? According to one of my bibles, the English Standard Version, the verse 1 John 3:9 is this: No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God's seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God. The word practice there seems to give deeper meaning, and as I ...


6

In the context of a 1st century pious writer it would have been interpreted as the exact opposite of arrogance, in fact. It is much like Jesus referring to himself as "The Son of Man" instead of saying 'I' or 'me'.


6

There's an interesting passage towards the end of the Gospel of John, after Jesus's resurrection: John 21:21-23 21 Peter seeing him saith to Jesus, Lord, and what shall this man do? 22 Jesus saith unto him, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? follow thou me. 23 Then went this saying abroad among the brethren, that ...


3

The rapture itself is not described in the Revelation, and for that reason there are three common conceptions as to when it will occur, of which I am sure you are aware. There are however some hints we can use to form our own opinion as to when it will occur in Revelation. As I'm sure you are aware the rapture is a concept formed from being caught up into ...


2

We know from scripture that he was exiled on the Isle of Patmos near the end of his life - reliable understandings of when his epistles and the book of Revelation were penned indicate it was around the year 90 AD. Where he was between ~50AD and 90AD (with 50 being a plausible time for Paul's early writings, and the original disciples/apostles to still be in ...


2

The answer lies in the history of the gospels. All the New Testament gospels were originally anonymous until attributed to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John later in the second century. The Church Fathers looked for clues that might help them decide who probably wrote each of the gospels. In the case of the fourth gospel, the Church Fathers noticed that it never ...


2

Aristotle (384-322 BC) talked about zoe versus psyche in his treatise De Anima ("On the Soul"). However, his concept of the mortal and immortal components of the complete human is a bit different than our current understanding. An excerpt from the Catholic Encyclopedia discusses this: For Aristotle, in the case of living natural bodies the vital ...


2

The earliest written tradition placing John in Ephesus comes from Irenaeus, Against Heresies, book 3, chapter 3, section 4. During an explanation of how the apostles passed on teachings to their chosen successors, Irenaeus says: There are also those who heard from him [Polycarp] that John, the disciple of the Lord, going to bathe at Ephesus, and ...


2

Doctrine and Covenants Section 7 Revelation given to Joseph Smith the Prophet and Oliver Cowdery, at Harmony, Pennsylvania, April 1829, when they inquired through the Urim and Thummim as to whether John, the beloved disciple, tarried in the flesh or had died. The revelation is a translated version of the record made on parchment by John and hidden up by ...


1

Revelation 6-8 follows closely the timeline Jesus gave in Matthew 24 on the end-times events and His return. Based on the parallel events, where the Bible interprets itself, we can tell at which point deliverance comes for God's elect (the rapture): Mt 24:5, Rv 6:1-2 -- Mt: False Christs; Rv: First seal (false savior on white horse). Mt 24:6, Rv 6:3-4 -- ...


1

Short answer Yes. Biblical Evidence God created man in his own image: Gen. 1:27 God created man, in the likeness of God made he him: Gen. 5:1 . in the image of God made he man: Gen. 9:6 . Lord went his way, as soon as he had left communing: Gen. 18:33 . I have seen God face to face: Gen. 32:30 . they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet: ...


1

John 1:18 "No man has seen God at any time; the only-begotten god who is at the Father’s side is the one who has explained Him." It may be possible, however that the prophets may have seen aspects of him such as found in Ezekiel 1:26-28 "Above the expanse that was over their heads was what looked like a sapphire stone, and it resembled a throne. ...


1

I thought I should provide this information. I just want to point out that this is from an Eastern Tradition Perspective. In Aramaic Revelation (From Crawford Codex manuscript) used in Some Eastern Traditions, you will see this title - "The Revelation which came to John the Evangelist from God in Patmos Island to which he was exiled by Nero Caesar." ...



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