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16

Job 1:15 and 1:17 refer to raids by the Sabeans and Chaldeans respectively. The Sabeans are a bit tricky to identify, but the Chaldeans (Hebrew kasdim) are definitely a Babylonian tribe. They were one of the groups to sack Nineveh after the death of Ashurbanipal. The Chaldeans were around for quite a while before that - Genesis 11:28, 11:31 has "Ur of the ...


12

You might like to take a look at the related questions What does the Bible have to say about dinosaurs? and Are Dinosaurs mentioned in the Bible? for some dinosaur-specific ideas; and Do Catholics consider Job to be historical? for, well, exactly what the question title says. Job is a bit of a tricky book in many ways. It is certainly held up as a ...


7

I believe it is because Job's complaining went beyond merely complaining and went into self-justification and questioning God. Job 40:1-5 Then the LORD said to Job, "Will the faultfinder contend with the Almighty? Let him who reproves God answer it. Then Job answered the LORD and said, "Behold, I am insignificant; what can I reply to You? ...


6

In chapter 19 we see a clear view of Job's beliefs on the subject, which explains (at least partially) where he would have found the strength to recover from his grief at the loss of his children: Job 19:23-26 23 Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book! 24 That they were graven with an iron pen and lead in the ...


5

Catholic Tradition treats Job as an inspired parable and, like lots of the Bible, take this and the assumption that it has multiple authors for granted (not at the expense of its divine inspiration). So... I think it's not a particularly impious statement to say that Job probably wasn't a written story until well after the dynastic period and into the time ...


4

I've been taught (Reformed Presbyterian) that Job's first three friends did some things right (e.g., wait until Job spoke first), but mostly they did things wrong (applied generally good theology incorrectly to the situation at hand). Elihu was not commenting on the previous history and whether Job had sinned before all the catastrophe; Elihu was commenting ...


3

At the moment of Creation, evil was separated from Righteousness. In Ephesians chapter 3, Paul writes about the eternal plan of God: "v10 (God's) intent was that now, through the church, the manifold wisdom of God should be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms (Satan and other angels in Job ch 1&2 etc.), v11 according to his ...


3

Yes, there has been an evolution in thinking about the nature of the devil. Jeffrey B. Russell says, in The Prince of Darkness, page 37, that in Job, Satan is already a personality with the function of accusing, opposing, and harming human beings. He is not yet the principle of evil, for he is still one of the heavenly court and does nothing without God's ...


3

As to your question regarding origins, we do not know the author or the means of revelation of the book of Job. What we do know is that there is an ancient tradition including the book in Hebrew scripture. The book makes no reference to the patriarchs or the law or the prophets but it is consistent with teachings therein and is commonly considered to ...


3

Job was a man who loved God. Satan told God that he only reason Job loved Him was because He allowed him to be wealthy. So to prove him wrong, God allowed Satan to take all of Job's possessions. Job's oldest son's home was destroyed by a violent wind. All of Job's children were partying there and were killed. In his sadness, Job tore his robe. Despite all ...


3

Considering the omnipresence of God, a good question to ask would be, "How could God not be around Satan?" Psalm 139 as well as other places describe how God is everywhere and fills heaven and earth. There is, however, a distinction in the impact of His presence. For instance, if the police show up while a crime is taking place, how can they tell the ...


2

Good question. The question revolves around the fact that Satan was around God. The point here is that Satan was not legally condemed, because there was no proof that he was the one doing all the bad actions. Sure, God knows that he did it. But in order to properly condemn Satan of his sins, which came to the sacrifice of his only son, Jesus. This is where ...


2

I don't know if Chesterton speaks for the whole Church, but he says: The doctors disagree, as it is the business of doctors to do; but more to the reality of Job's construction: The Book of Job may have grown gradually just as Westminster Abbey grew gradually. But the people who made the old folk poetry, like the people who made Westminster Abbey, ...


2

The Bible says the devil = Satan in Revelation 12:9 So the great dragon was cast out, that serpent of old, called the Devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was cast to the earth, and his angels were cast out with him. Regarding Lucifer the Bible says in Isaiah 14:12... How you are fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! ...


2

The problem with the answers previously given here, and what the majority of English-speaking Christians believe, is that it comes from a perspective of the English translation of the Bible. The Bible isn't of English origin. The Old Testament was written in Hebrew (and called Tanach in that language), and the New Testament was written in Greek. Lucifer isn'...


2

There are suggestions that Uz is in central Syria, north of Israel, because of a genealogy in Genesis 10:23, but hard evidence for its location is not so readily available. Reference to attacks by Chaldeans (Job 1:17) would normally place the location of Uz to the east of Palestine, but reference to the Sabaeans would probably place its location in southern ...


2

In ancient Near Eastern religions, Leviathan was a multi-headed chaos monster whom the gods had to defeat at the time of creation. Mark S. Smith says, in The Early History of God, page 86, a seal from Tel Asmar (c.2200 BCE) depicts a god battling a seven-headed dragon, identified as Baal's enemy, Leviathan, and God's adversary in the Bible. The ...


1

Well, since nothing unholy can be in the presence of God, and Heaven is in a sense being in communion with God... then a Satan who is tempting Adam and Eve to disobey in the Garden must be a Satan who is already evil himself. So at the very least, it must be prior to the temptation in the Garden. I am on less firm ground stating that it is before the ...


1

And I saw an angel come down from heaven, having the key of the bottomless pit and a great chain in his hand. And he laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent, which is the Devil, and Satan, and bound him a thousand years, Revelation 20:1-2 In the Ezekiel passage, though this is God speaking to the King of Tyre, He also speaks to Satan. ...


1

Traditionally the fallen angel is referred to as Lucifer ("light-bringing"). And he was named The devil ("slanderer" or "accuser") and Satan ("adversary" or "opposer") after he apostatized. He is called both The devil or Satan in the bibleRev 12:7-9. Whenever the article "The" (Hebrew: ho) is used in-front of devil, it always denotes Lucifer. Just like the ...


1

At Acts 2:34 we see that not even David, who was considered to be one of the righteous kings, ascended to heaven. The Bible indicates that Jesus was the first one to be resurrected to spirit life and ascend to heaven. (John 3:13) This would include Job and his sons and daughters. They are still potentially eligible for a resurrection to earthly life during ...


1

It seems that the reason that God was so angry with Job was because of Job's pride and arrogance. After chapters 38 and 39 where God displays his omnipresence and omnipotence to Job, God confronts Job saying, showing that Job's wisdom is power is limited and finite: Job 40:8-9 (NASB) 8 “Will you really annul My judgment? Will you condemn Me that you ...


1

It apears logical that Job lived after the flood in the land of UZ. (Edom) southern Isreal and extending outward over its borders.I am disapointed that he did not live preflood with the huge dinasours.(i was sure).But however more interestingly the possibility that there were sizabley large post flood dinasours. Re: Behamoth, Laviathon.Lamentations 4:21 ...


1

On Job 1:1, it is said: "There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job." Uz may have been refering to The Uz, who was the son of Aram and a direct descendent of Shem. Or, Uz might have been a variation to the word Oz, which means east. In Job 1:3, it is said that Job was the greatest man of all East. Most scholars will date Job in 4th and 6th BCE/BC. ...



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