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The best historical evidence to Jesus resurrection would have to be given by someone with nothing to gain from it. As a follower of Christ and believer that He is the Messiah, I have something to gain from telling everyone I've seen the resurrected Jesus - it gives proof and validity to my beliefs; It makes me "not crazy" to have followed Him. This would ...


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The answer that I have been given was that Thomas looked to Jesus and stated "My Lord" and then to heaven and said "My God" as a praise to Jeohovah for his miracle. I know this answer doesn't have an "official stance of the WatchTower" feel to it, but nine times out of ten, this will be the answer they give you on your doorstep. I have looked, with no ...


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People have argued for the truth of Jesus' Resurrection on the basis of the biblical record alone, because there is no archaeological evidence and no extra-biblical evidence for his Resurrection. The Gospels of Matthew and John have long been regarded as eyewitness accounts, which means that they ought to be sufficient evidence. However, the four New ...


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That's actually a very good question that people do not ask as often as they should. You are right that it is important to distinguish between evidence and the explanation of that evidence. With historical evidence, it is also important to qualify what we mean by historical "evidence." Many people today limit this to physical evidence like archaeological ...


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The Rapture is a very modern notion that completely defies all of Gods Revelation. The basis of it is primarily American Protestant in origin. How unlikely is that? The apostle Paul often uses reference to Old Testament writings, in 1 Thessalonians he is referencing Exodus 19 and how the Israelites where to meet God in the Clouds. He often speaks this ...


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Signs for “Book of Revelation” is happening? The first three chapters of Revelation consists of a letter to be past the seven churches in what is now Western Turkey. Some have conjectured that these churches represent the stages of development of the Christian churches over the last 2,000 year. Although the last church Laodicea does sound like the modern ...


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Table of Contents Jesus is the seed of David The Meaning of "Seed" How Jesus is the Seed of David The Incarnation (ἡ ἐνσάρκωσις) Jesus is the seed of David The Lord Jesus Christ is the Messiah, "the seed of David" (τὸ σπέρμα Δαβίδ), as the New Testament confirms (Rom. 1:3; 2 Tim. 2:8 cp. John 7:42). Meaning of "Seed" How is Jesus the Messiah, ...


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This answer is based on the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), and represents the views of the "Swedenborgian" or "New Church" denominations that accept his theology. Note that this theology is outside the mainstream of traditional Christian theology in that Swedenborg rejected the doctrine of the Trinity of Persons, holding instead that the ...


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"How is Jesus the Messiah, the seed of David"? Simple: Jesus is the human aspect of the offspring of David. Before that, Jesus was spirit. Jesus created all things, including humanity, as one of the persons of the Godhead before He was flesh and blood. It was only after Mary gave birth to Him that Jesus became flesh and blood. So this is not a circle. To ...


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Jesus was tempted thrice by the Devil and he responded three words that defeated the Devil: "IT IS WRITTEN." ~ Matthew 4:1-11 Jesus never did refer to oral traditions in a positive way.Rather, every time he defends truth he refers to the scriptures: Thus you nullify the word of God by your tradition that you have handed down. And you do many things ...


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He was not telling us NOT to wear Tzit Tzit or Tefillin. He was saying NOT to be like the P'rushim. To not be hypocrites like they were. It is always good to read the whole chapter in context rather than taking one liners. The WHOLE paragraph reads: Then Yeshua addressed the crowds and his talmidim: 2 “The Torah-teachers and the P’rushim,” he said, “sit ...


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While this isn't a question that can be definitively answered, I've heard teaching that links these types of incidents to John 6:1-15, particularly verses 14-15 (NIV quoted here): 14 After the people saw the sign Jesus performed, they began to say, “Surely this is the Prophet who is to come into the world.” 15 Jesus, knowing that they intended to ...


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We can only speculate as to why. "Jesus did not need the praise of demons." is the most common answer I hear. One that comes to my mind is that demons lie. They mix the truth with the lie so it sounds credible and is accepted as truth. Also, since we only see text on paper, we have no understanding of what the emotional expressions were in their ...


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This is an interesting speculative question. If you're interested in it, I highly recommend that you read the "Perlandra" trilogy by CS Lewis. The whole trilogy uses a fictional universe to engage with the question of God's salvation and other species on other planets in our solar system. Here is what he says on page 123 of the second book, titled ...


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Difference between Lazarus rising from the dead and Jesus resurrection and ascension? Prior to the resurrection of Jesus, those who trusted (had faith) did not receive new and eternal life. They were to be raised and get their new life at the "first resurrection". Hebrews 11:39-40 And these all, having obtained a good report through faith, received ...


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The simplest answer to your question is that Lazarus was raised by Jesus command; while Jesus raised at his own command. John 11:43 KJV And when he thus had spoken, he cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, come forth. John 2:19 KJV Jesus answered and said unto them, Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up. John 5:26 For as the ...


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There is indeed a deeper meaning. The village in which they were going refers to the destination of the Apostles not to Christ. Christ was indeed not intending to stay with the disciples that night, he was there for a very important historical and biblical reason. He was there so that the desciples would know how to recognize Him. Luke 24:30-35 It is ...


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Why did Jesus not want people to talk about his healing? The works Jesus did were to authenticate his ministry. Matthew 11:2-5 Now when John had heard in the prison the works of Christ, he sent two of his disciples, And said unto him, Art thou he that should come, or do we look for another? Jesus answered and said unto them, Go and shew John ...


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Verse 31 also says".... and He vanished out of their sight." In deed, Jesus had not intended to stay with the disciples for the night, but had only wanted `to open their eyes ' to and have them recognize Him. He had also wanted that the initiative for such a recognition with 'burning of the heart' come from the disciples with an invitation to Him to stay ...


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The interpretation that when the text says Jesus was acting like he was going to go on, he was "pretending" to go further may be true, but it is extrapolating from the text. The text tells us what Jesus' actions were, that he was "acting as if" he were going further. Whether this was pretense or not depends upon what Jesus' thinking was at the time, and ...


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Yes! I found it in Isaiah 53: But he was pierced for our transgressions,     he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was on him,     and by his wounds we are healed. 6 We all, like sheep, have gone astray,     each of us has turned to our own way; and the Lord has laid on him     the iniquity of us all. 7 ...


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This is known as the Messianic Secret and occurs primarily in the Gospel of Mark, where Jesus is portrayed as commanding his followers to be silent about his Messianic mission. Throughout the Gospel of Mark, there are regular examples of Jesus admonishing both people and demons not to reveal to others who he truly was. Conversely, there are some passages in ...


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Jesus was totally aware of the future, and he was also aware of all of the possibilities of people making differing decisions. In other words God will not interfere with our free will, and so the future depends heavily on all our decisions and each decision will set into motion a different course for the future. Although Jesus was afraid of nothing, the ...


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Why was Jesus, who is God, baptized by John the Baptist? When Jesus was baptised by means of "the laying on of hands" (Leviticus 16:21), it was "one Man's" righteous act (Romans 5:18), which took away all the sins of humankind. When Jesus was baptized, He said to John, "Permit it to be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all ...


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The most important figure in the history of the Church for this passage is St Maximus the Confessor, who considered it in the context of the Monothelite heresy. (Monothelitism is the belief that there is only one "will" in Jesus Christ; Maximus and the orthodox tradition have held that there are two wills in Christ as there are two natures: the human will ...


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The short answer is: Mat 26:41 All of you must stay awake and pray that you won't be tested. The spirit [PNEUMA="breath"] is indeed willing, but the body is weak." Which I would translate loosely as: "Talk is cheap but pain will turn your head around." I would add a few things: Jesus was not a volunteer It was not Jesus' will that he die Jesus ...


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Ontological Equality It is true that fathers and sons aren't equal but this is only in terms of function and role. Thus, functional subordination.The offspring submits to parental authority. On the other hand, fathers and sons can be equal in other sense.For instance, it their actions (activities) or aptitude (natural ability) that stems from their ...


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TLDR; In this passage, Jesus uses language claiming God as a personal father; a begetting father, rather than in an abstract, "God is the Father of Humanity" sort of way. From here, the Jews performed simple deductive logic; the son of God is a god, therefore Jesus is claiming to be a god. More specifically, Jesus was claiming to be as divine as God, and ...


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Summary: Evangelical commentators don't take the "making himself equal with God" phrase as a referring only to Jesus's claim that God is his Father, but to his claim that he acts like his Father. Understanding the context here is important. Here's the full passage (John 5:16–18): 16 And this was why the Jews were persecuting Jesus, because he was doing ...


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Peace Comes After the Storm Simply put, Jesus did not experience fear and a lack of power and self-control; rather, as you pointed out, he experienced anguish (or stress, trouble, or agony). The infinite load of sin he was to bear in a few short hours was the reason for his anguish in the garden. Sin, as we know, is the very antithesis of peace. Peace, ...


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We often think of Jesus as Deity and ascribe those type of emotions and etc. to him. We need to remember that Jesus was also a human being and as such he knew all of those feelings which we encounter. He knew hunger: Matthew 21:17 through 19 KJV And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there. 18 Now in the morning as he ...


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More of the biblical basis side of things than an overview, but we've just been looking at an answer to this question tonight, as found in Hebrews 4:14-5:10 - Jesus the Great High Priest 14 Therefore, since we have a great high priest who has ascended into heaven, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith we profess. 15 For we do not ...


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We can identify several views regarding the suffering of Jesus. (1) That he did feel fear and grief, but did not sin. (2) That he did not feel fear, per se, but did feel grief. Within (2), there are differing understandings of why Jesus felt grief and agony. Those who (a) accept penal substitution will argue that he was suffering on behalf of his people, ...


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There are other references in Scripture that present this same phenomenon of the apparent eclipse of time. For instance, in Revelation 13:8, Jesus is referred to as "the Lamb that was slain from the creation of the world." Now the cross occurred at a precise moment of history. We know when the Lamb of God was slain. But the Bible says it occurred before the ...


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The passage is not about suicide. You can tell this because the temptation given to Jesus is: "throw yourself down. For it is written: 'He will command his angels concerning you, and they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.'" In other words, Jesus would not be killed by throwing himself off the ...


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The passage has nothing to do with Suicide and everything to do with temptation. In order to understand the Gospel as it has been preserved one must understand first, what we fell from, and Second, what we aspire to rise to. The temptations giving to Christ are the same as those outlined in 1 John 2:16 "For everything in the world--the lust of the ...


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Evangelicals defend this analogy by arguing (1) that even in the original context, "Abraham's offspring" did not refer to all Abraham's physical descendants, (2) that "Christ" can be interpreted as a spiritual descendant, not merely a single physical descendant, and (3) that the context, particularly Galatians 3:28–29, demonstrates that Christians are joined ...


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If this is not a decent physical description, I don't know what is: Revelation 1:13-15 and in the middle of the lampstands I saw one like a son of man, clothed in a robe reaching to the feet, and girded across His chest with a golden sash. His head and His hair were white like white wool, like snow; and His eyes were like a flame of fire. His feet were ...


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I agree with previous answers, but I would like to take a look at a different angle of the question. Asking about "non-Trinitarians" is extremely broad, since there are many groups from many different time periods. I will focus on one (albeit still extremely broad) group, namely, what would a (hypothetical) person in the Ancient Near East from the ...


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From a Swedenborgian perspective, there is a simple answer and a complex answer to this question. The Simple Answer The simple answer does not require the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) at all. It only requires common human experience: Jesus was talking to himself. People often talk to themselves. Sometimes they even do it out loud! I doubt ...


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Was there a reason Jesus came at the time he did? The short answer is "yes" – there is nothing accidental about how the key events in the Bible timeline unfold. This is evident in Acts 41 for example: 27for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with ...


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We needed a perfect sacrifice to trade our sin for forgiveness. But, as sin was all we knew, we needed a perfect sacrifice, and the only perfect thing was God.


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The hypothetical volunteer you posit has it wrong: “I will be the sacrifice and take on all the sins of the world past, present, and future and suffer and die as a substitutionary atonement for all of mankind” Jesus is never said to be an atonement. Jesus is never said to be a substitutionary atonement. Jesus is never said to take on all the sins of the ...


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Fallen human beings are all disqualified because we all inherit the sinful nature. If Jesus had even one sin, He could never die for others' sins because He would have to die for His own. Therefore Christ knew no sin (2 Cor. 5:21; Heb. 4:15). He was made only in the likeness of the flesh of sin (Rom. 8:3). He was without spot or blemish (1 Pet. 1:19). ...


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I can answer this for one particular group of non-trinitarians: the "Swedenborgian" denominations that accept the Christian theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772). Swedenborg rejected the traditional doctrine of the Trinity, saying that God is not three persons, but one person, in which the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three "essential components" ...


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I've come across a few different meanings. Here are three examples: Adoptionism: Jesus was born just a man, but was adopted as God's own Son. There are a few reasons that are given for this (simply from God's grace; Jesus was the supreme religious expert for two examples). Those who defend this position often point to Jesus's baptism as the moment that ...


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it is not appropriate for us to convey a falsehood regarding the clothing of the people of old including the Messayah.It is imperative to accept that weaving looms had not been invented. The only clothing material available was animal skin.That is what the Messayah wore. Even David as king put on such. Remember Adam's clothing was made of after they ...


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The factor which makes a sacrifice acceptable to God has to do with obedience to the original command of God not to eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. When Adam and Eve ate from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, their souls were contaminated in two ways, which made them no longer acceptable to God. They disobeyed God. ...


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I'd just add that anyone other than a perfect sacrifice (Jesus) would also be tainted with sin and would require a savior themselves. How could any sinful person provide salvation for others when they themselves need saved from their own sinful condition?


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According to the levitical priesthood a sacrifice had to be without defect Lev 22:20 Do not bring anything with a defect, because it will not be accepted on your behalf. In this case any sacrifice offered to God has to be without defect. We humans are born into sin and no one lives a life without sin. Romans 3:23 tells us we have all sinned and ...



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